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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Pasadena, CA
    Posts
    602
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I call most black belts sensei unless they correct me. I use "sir" a lot for anyone of a higher rank than me... that's admittedly a holdover from TKD more than proper Judo etiquette.

    Its nice that I have been in clubs where they don't really care that much about titles.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Fargo, North Dakota
    Posts
    192
    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    My judo club is pretty casual, we really just use sensei when we are visiting a different school or at a seminar. This may be on account of class is almost always run by one of our nidans and none of them really like being called sensei.

  3. #13
    I feel like you eyeballin' me, dawg!
    DarkPhoenix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Wyomissing, PA
    Posts
    2,244
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Most of the students, kids and adults alike, call any black belt they see "sensei". I am starting to break that since I am not "sensei". I just tell them to call me "sempai".
    I feel like you eye-bawlin' me, dawg!

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    491
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    FWIW, in Japan the term is thrown around pretty loosely. Really, anyone in a teaching or otherwise authoritative role can be called sensei, although I'm sure groups here and there are not without their own conventions. It's also rather uncommon to say someone's name + sensei, beyond specific addressal in a group of likely people or some formality. For actual scholarly types, the terms "kyouju" and "hakase" are usually applied, and there are specific titles for other masteries as well.

    What really wigs me out is the "sensei + name" routine...

  5. #15
    Hedgehogey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    5,330
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    There is no per se 'teaching rank' for judo in the USA. To be a teacher you need to have coach's certification, or at least someone with it has to be present on the mat. I have it and i'm a nikkyu but there are sandans who don't.


    "The only important elements in any society
    are the artistic and the criminal,
    because they alone, by questioning the society's values,
    can force it to change."-Samuel R. Delany

    RENDERING GELATINOUS WINDMILL OF DICKS

    THIS IS GOING TO BE THE BEST NON-EUCLIDIAN SPLATTERJOUST EVER

    It seems that the only people who support anarchy are faggots, who want their pathetic immoral lifestyle accepted by the mainstream society. It wont be so they try to create their own.-Oldman34, friend to all children

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    4,271
    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Hedgehogey View Post
    There is no per se 'teaching rank' for judo in the USA. To be a teacher you need to have coach's certification, or at least someone with it has to be present on the mat. I have it and i'm a nikkyu but there are sandans who don't.
    In your case, it would be "Grand Dragon Of The Invisible Empire".

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Central FL
    Posts
    22
    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I am ikkyu and senpai (senior student) and spend a lot of time "teaching". I lead warmup and drills and instruct in techniques to assist my sensei (he is not 100% physically able), sometimes running the class when he's absent.
    A lot of the younger students call me sensei, though not because I've asked them to. I'd rather be a regular student, but I'm glad to assist in service.

    Fwiw, I believe USJA calls Yodan and above a teacher grade.

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