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  1. DCS is online now
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    Posted On:
    12/02/2014 1:24pm

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    Adult autists restraining methods.

    Hi

    I've been asked to develop a restraining curriculum for auxiliary nurses who work with adults suffering low functioning autism.

    The only thing I've found more or less sensible is this:

    http://montrealsystema.blogspot.com....-by-kevin.html

    So this is going to be the template but I'm open to other approaches.

    Suggestions, criticism and the like are welcome.
  2. BKR is online now
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    Anything in the medical field out there on the subject ? You might want to look and see if there are already standard methods and policies employed, especially ones that involve two or more people working together rather than a single person.

    I don't think that a small-statured nurse is going to be able to physically control/restrain an autistic adult, male or female. Or a non-autistic person for that matter.

    Most hospitals have what are called "orderlies" to help out with that sort of thing...
    Falling for Judo since 1980
  3. DCS is online now
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    Posted On:
    12/02/2014 2:49pm

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    Quote Originally Posted by BKR View Post
    Anything in the medical field out there on the subject ? You might want to look and see if there are already standard methods and policies employed, especially ones that involve two or more people working together rather than a single person.

    I don't think that a small-statured nurse is going to be able to physically control/restrain an autistic adult, male or female. Or a non-autistic person for that matter.

    Most hospitals have what are called "orderlies" to help out with that sort of thing...
    I have that part covered.

    What I'm looking for is something for SHTF: nurse alone on the room and time needed to assembly the restraining/rescue team.
  4. BKR is online now
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    Posted On:
    12/02/2014 6:42pm

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    Quote Originally Posted by DCS View Post
    I have that part covered.

    What I'm looking for is something for SHTF: nurse alone on the room and time needed to assembly the restraining/rescue team.
    Run out of the room and lock the door behind them? Agility training to dodge being grabbed, struck, stuff thrown at them?

    I'm being serious. Your task seems to me to be a bit like trying do what those weekend seminar anti-rape self defense classes attempt.

    What exactly would a "low functioning" autistic adult be capable of ?

    How about keep a chair or other object between you and the low functioning autistic patient while calling for help ?
    Falling for Judo since 1980
  5. Sam Browning is online now

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    Posted On:
    12/02/2014 8:28pm

    hall of famestaff
     

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Scrapper used to work in this field, you should shoot him an email.
  6. slamdunc is online now
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    Posted On:
    12/02/2014 9:17pm

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    Quote Originally Posted by BKR View Post
    Run out of the room and lock the door behind them? Agility training to dodge being grabbed, struck, stuff thrown at them?
    Yes
    Quote Originally Posted by BKR View Post
    How about keep a chair or other object between you and the low functioning autistic patient while calling for help ?
    and Yes again.

    People tend to believe that it comes down to a tough guy scenario. In reality, it is situational; positioning and awareness will eliminate 95% of the scenarios one would be training for in the first place.
  7. DCS is online now
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    Posted On:
    12/03/2014 6:25am

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    Quote Originally Posted by BKR View Post
    Run out of the room and lock the door behind them? Agility training to dodge being grabbed, struck, stuff thrown at them?
    I'm being serious. Your task seems to me to be a bit like trying do what those weekend seminar anti-rape self defense classes attempt.
    Yes, to some point. And because of that I'll try to give the nurses a small number of very basic and simple principle based techniques they can drill without much need of specialized supervision.

    This is more about "how to use a fire extinguisher to save your ass" than "how to put down a fire with a firehose" for that is the role of the restraining team.


    What exactly would a "low functioning" autistic adult be capable of?
    The most usual is injuring themselves, e.g.



    (the first min.)

    So they need to be restrained. Of course trying to avoid both parts being injured in the process.

    Of course awareness is paramount, especially for noticing the cues of inminent violent behaviour, but running away from a patient trying to open his own skull against a wall or chewing his fingers off is not always an option.
  8. BKR is online now
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    Posted On:
    12/03/2014 12:05pm

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Browning View Post
    Scrapper used to work in this field, you should shoot him an email.
    I know Scrapper is a short, skinny guy with no training, too !
    Falling for Judo since 1980
  9. BKR is online now
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    Posted On:
    12/03/2014 12:07pm

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    Quote Originally Posted by slamdunc View Post
    Yes
    and Yes again.

    People tend to believe that it comes down to a tough guy scenario. In reality, it is situational; positioning and awareness will eliminate 95% of the scenarios one would be training for in the first place.
    Every time I get to feel confident that I can "handle" someone in a one-one-one H2H situation, I shake hands with some big dude who obviously could crush the bones in my hand into powder if he wanted to.

    Then I imagine having to take him down and cuff him alone before any backup arrives.

    My only solace is that more than likely he is at least a high functioning autistic...
    Falling for Judo since 1980
  10. Permalost is online now
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    Posted On:
    12/03/2014 12:22pm

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    An arm drag to double underhook from behind seems like a fairly simple, useful technique to best position oneself safely without hurting the other person.
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