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  1. shs101 is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/11/2013 12:49pm


     

    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    boxing southpaw stuff

    whether you are a southpaw or fighting one what are some more advanced or unlooked aspects of fighting opposite stance people? everyone emphasizes lead foot to the outside but anyone have any more in depth concepts,positioning details,strategy,tricks,combinations,etc etc......thanks in advance
    boxing reference also
  2. dwkfym is offline
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    Posted On:
    3/13/2013 5:09pm

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     PDS Rifles Style: Univ. Florida Kickboxing

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Its very hard to talk about this in one thread. As far as positioning goes, its not as simple as lead foot outside. If you simply step out to his outside, you'll notice his head is actually blocked by his shoulders.

    Like anything else boxing, its all about creating openings, but more so with southpaw vs orthodox. Southpaw vs Orthodox, neither partner has much openings. Its not like when the sides are matched where you have a sweet punch already set up for you (your jab). Typically I create openings in a few ways.

    Jabs: like anything else. Just takes more sparring time to 'get it' Most of your jabs will simply land on the guard. Mix the jabs up; upstairs downstairs. You can do this without exposing yourself to his right too bad, since attacking the lead side of his body won't cause you to get too close to his right hand. If you know how to jab and scoot sideways at the same time, even better.

    When i actually get outside against orthodox, I like to hit him in the body,
    IMO a lot of it is contineously moving to the outside to get him to make some openings for you. Trying to go to the head has some disadvantages; his shoulder and guard is still in the way. If you go to the body, then he can't see your punches coming. And it will open up the head a bit more too.

    I use footwork to get my opponent to open up his centerline as well. If you are mobile in the ring, your opponent will keep moving to keep up with you. That may get him to open his stance up, at least momentarily.

    Don't forget your left. While I still throw more jabs than anything else, every once in a while I open with my left. It catches most orthodox fighters by surprise. My fav move is to sneak in two lefts; one to the body, pull out, come right back in to the head. Just don't rely on it. Your jab is still your bread and butter. Your left is too easy to counter off of if you end up using your left like your jab.

    If you stay unpredictable with which direction you are moving, then you can sometimes move to his inside which will give you a few more angles. Land quick combos and get out. Be ready to guard against his right.

    You can also sneak in uppercuts with both lead and rear punches as you move off line. Lead uppercut should almost slide up his body. Your left is available to block his right hook. Left uppecut is awkward but easier to execute, especially if you are able to counter and move offline. It also lets you follow up with a right hook, or a overhand right hook if he is taller than you.

    Honestly, its not that much different than fighting southpaw vs southpaw. Just use your jabs frequently and smartly and you'll start seeing the angles.
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  3. Sang is offline
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    Posted On:
    3/20/2013 7:49pm


     Style: MMA, Yoga

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Best tip i can give for a new southpaw boxer is to drill the below counter until it is muscle memory. Orthodox people are in the same position as you, they find the jab awkward to land and often have the only strategy in their arsenal "move to outside and throw straight".

    Opponent throws straight right to head
    Southpaw slips to left, returns fire with left hand to open target (usually overhand left to head, straight left to body or left rip to liver)


    Lately I've been using the jab a lot to target the opening created when my opponent steps outside, or by cutting the inside angle myself. The likely reaction is they throw a straight after I land the jab, which I'm ready to counter.
    "Boxing is the art of hitting an opponent from the furthest distance away, exposing the least amount of your body while getting into position to punch with maximum leverage and not getting hit."
    Kenny Weldon
  4. Permalost is offline
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    Posted On:
    3/21/2013 11:39am

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     Style: FMA, dumbek, Indian clubs

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    DBMA's Kali Tudo stuff often focuses on using an unmatched lead. So, against a normal person, a southpaw qualifies as an unmatched lead. They sometimes use examples from boxing footage, and seem to be fond of Prince Naseem for his footwork.
  5. Sang is offline
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    Posted On:
    3/21/2013 9:10pm


     Style: MMA, Yoga

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Permalost View Post
    DBMA's Kali Tudo stuff often focuses on using an unmatched lead. So, against a normal person, a southpaw qualifies as an unmatched lead. They sometimes use examples from boxing footage, and seem to be fond of Prince Naseem for his footwork.
    Personally I'd avoid examples from genetic freaks who can get away with things other fighters can't such as Naseem, Roy Jones J, Ali.

    Best book I found on angles and footwork was The Sabaki Method. Not sure how relevant to boxing but helped my striking immensely.
    "Boxing is the art of hitting an opponent from the furthest distance away, exposing the least amount of your body while getting into position to punch with maximum leverage and not getting hit."
    Kenny Weldon
  6. shs101 is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/24/2013 3:07pm


     

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Thanks for the replies. Does anyone have any advice on landing the lead hook vs an opposite stance? Any positioning/concepts that I can follow to land more strong hooks

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