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  1. Krijgsman is online now

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    Posted On:
    4/04/2013 6:29pm


     Style: Judo noob, injured guy.

    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Omega Supreme View Post
    Yeah, well your instructor sucks too.
    I'm gonna tell him you said that. If he cries its your fault.
  2. crappler is offline
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    Posted On:
    4/04/2013 8:16pm


     Style: Judo

    3
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Is there anyone living in Tahiti or Bora Bora on this website? Because your punching technique totally SUCKS and you don't know how to do anything!!!
    "We often joke -- and we really wish it were a joke -- that you will only encounter two basic problems with your 'self-defense' training.
    1) That it doesn't work
    2) That it does work"
    -Animal MacYoung
  3. cyrijl is offline
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    Posted On:
    4/05/2013 11:49am

    supporting member
     Style: BJJ, MT, Yoga

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I prefer movement based drills for warmups (I don't teach the beginner's class, so that would be rolls, shrimping, etc). One 3 min drill is just for movement and warmimg up and then one 3 min drill based on the day's class theme. I also think schools should be open 15-30 minutes before class for those who really want to warm up. I have seen warmups used as a time waster. Also in the more competition bases schools warmups are used for conditioning...in some of these schools the warmups have the opposite effect. Students are in great shape and tough, but their techniques suffer.
    There is no cheating, there is only jiu-jitsu.
  4. Omega Supreme is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/05/2013 12:04pm

    staff
     Style: Chinese Boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by cyrijl View Post
    I prefer movement based drills for warmups (I don't teach the beginner's class, so that would be rolls, shrimping, etc). One 3 min drill is just for movement and warmimg up and then one 3 min drill based on the day's class theme. I also think schools should be open 15-30 minutes before class for those who really want to warm up. I have seen warmups used as a time waster. Also in the more competition bases schools warmups are used for conditioning...in some of these schools the warmups have the opposite effect. Students are in great shape and tough, but their techniques suffer.
    As a school owner I can't agree with you on that.
  5. Vieux Normand is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/05/2013 2:10pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: 血鷲

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by cyrijl View Post
    Students are in great shape and tough, but their techniques suffer.
    Students' techniques will suffer if those techniques are improperly taught and infrequently practised and tested.

    Being in great shape and "tough" (whatever your definition of that is--I'm referring to mental as well as physical resilience) can only have the opposite effect. Conditioning can help the frequency, intensity and duration of training--which includes acquisition and practice of techniques.

    When well-conditioned (and I do not mean over-exhausted), one can practise techniques longer, with the necessary intensity, more consistently and more often before hitting that gassed-out and/or burned-out phase where mistakes (and possible injuries) can occur.

    On the mental side, being out of shape can increase the chance that the participant, overtired due to lack of past conditioning, will attempt a technique in a mental state of frustration and do it inappropriately (example: trying to use muscle in a situation where leverage is the optimal tool). The possible implications, for that individual and any partner, are readily apparent.

    There will obviously be some adjustments needed, to any individual's regimen, based on pre-existing abilities and requirements. However, technique-versus-conditioning is a false dichotomy. Well-rounded MA training (for hobby, any level of competition, or due to job requirements) requires both.
  6. MrGalt is offline
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    Posted On:
    4/13/2013 6:09pm


     Style: Seidokaikan

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by patfromlogan View Post
    That makes sense. I was surprised at BJJ/MMA training how much (40 min) of really hard conditioning started class.

    But I'd take the other side of this. While we did (somewhat odd old fashioned) warmups, my Kyokushin sensei told class we didn't have time for running and pushups, so run and lift on your own. And the Hawaiian Kempo in Honolulu used striking, shrimping and partnered reversals/sweeps as warmups, which I thought was clever.



    I've always felt that I'd rather train martial arts in class rather than condition and most good schools train plenty hard - if I'm not sweating (as a sr black belt in class in related arts) I go to the instructor after class and suggest we sweat more - I do not say this in arts I suck at like Kendo or BJJ, but then I kept gassing out in BJJ so it wasn't much of an issue.

    The best for getting in shape was Kyokushin where we'd do 3/4th aerobic and 1/4 anaerobic - sensei planned the workout as a fitness exercise and fitted the marital aspects around the fitness goals. And most of us took his advice and ran - some lsd, some interval; I remember one brown saying at least do two miles at a decent pace two or three times a week for basic fitness/tone.
    My experience in Seido was like this. I used to lift and run in the mornings before work. Class time was for doing things you couldn't do by yourself. We would warm up with some stretches, run through kihon, and have an hour to 70 minutes of a 90 minute class left over for sparring unless it was a couple of weeks before a belt test, in which case we'd run through whatever would be on the test.

    I can't speak for grappling arts, but I will opine here that in karate if you're spending half of class time doing calisthenics, your instructor doesn't know how to run a class.
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