218275 Bullies, 7554 online  
  • Register
Our Sponsors:

Results 1 to 10 of 22
Page 1 of 3 1 23 LastLast
Sponsored Links Spacer Image
  1. doofaloofa is online now
    doofaloofa's Avatar

    I'm Svelte!

    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Wesht Cark
    Posts
    3,247

    Achievements:
    1000 Experience PointsOverdriveTagger First ClassThree FriendsYour first Group

    Posted On:
    3/14/2013 8:02pm

    supporting member
     Style: mma

    2
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Working with ADHD/ADD kids on the mats



    I thought I'd rescue this discussion from the other thread, as it is a subject that comes up frequently at our judo club

    It would be great to get a perspective from coaches and those who are on the spectrum

    ADHD


    ADD
    Considered in the abstract the boxing ring is an altar of sorts, one of those legendary spaces where the laws of a nation are suspended: inside the ropes, during an officially regulated three-minute round, a man may be killed by his opponent's hands but he cannot be legally murdered. Boxing inhabits a sacred space predating civilization; or, to use D.H. Lawrence's phrase, before God was love. If it suggests a savage ceremony or a rite of atonement it also suggests the futility of such gestures. For what possible atonement is the fight waged if it must shortly be waged again... and again? The boxing match is the very image, the more terrifying for being so stylized, of mankind's collective aggression; its ongoing historical madness.
    Joyce Carol Oates, On Boxing
  2. DKJr is online now
    DKJr's Avatar

    Fasten your seat belts, and prepare for lift off

    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Dallas
    Posts
    3,201

    Points
    4,929
    Achievements:
    Three Friends1 year registeredTagger Second Class10000 Experience Points

    Posted On:
    3/14/2013 8:39pm

    supporting member
     Style: Combat Cuddling

    5
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I was diagnosed with ADD at 10 (not hyperactive disorder but I get pretty damn close), and took meds for 11 years. I stopped because I felt it inhibited creative potential.

    What would you like to know?

    How I feel it affects my training?
    I've had to learn to force myself to focus, but I'll often get off track and chase random ideas about grips and hip movement.

    How does it affect being coached?
    When I'm learning a technique I break it down and my mind searches for the weaknesses immediately, I just scan through all the inefficiencies and then bring it down to the basic concept of how it works.

    Coaching?
    I try my damn hardest not to let my mind work on overdrive and just spout technique and idea out. I usually just teach 2 techniques and try not to over indulge on details. This has all come through practice, I used to just randomly spit out everything I got excited about as it related to the technique.

    Does it bleed into my technical abilities?
    Honestly I feel it gives me an advantage, I focus on nothing and let repetition take over. If you roll with me you'll notice I'm erratic and constantly moving to either improve or finish. I'm never still....ever...


    Oh and this one time Jiu Jit... oh is that the Daily Show I hear?
  3. goodlun is online now
    goodlun's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Ramona
    Posts
    4,615

    Points
    9,183
    Achievements:
    1 year registered5000 Experience Points

    Posted On:
    3/14/2013 8:52pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: BJJ

    2
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    We are going through this battle with my daughter and ADHD. She tries really hard to focus but it is very difficult for her. We certainly see a big difference when she has a stimulant vs not. Yeah who would have though that the medication for ADHD is stimulants?
  4. DKJr is online now
    DKJr's Avatar

    Fasten your seat belts, and prepare for lift off

    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Dallas
    Posts
    3,201

    Points
    4,929
    Achievements:
    Three Friends1 year registeredTagger Second Class10000 Experience Points

    Posted On:
    3/14/2013 9:43pm

    supporting member
     Style: Combat Cuddling

    3
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    BTW encourage your kid to follow all the random things they want to try out. I must've gone through a million different things growing up (also still), "I wanna be/do ___" Bass guitar, boxing, FBI agent, pilot, actor, basketball, piano, build robots, game designer, sports agent, military, etc.

    The best and worst thing about ADD is you're always bored or become disinterested, and rarely is anything "enough". The good part is you always try to strive for more or new.
  5. doofaloofa is online now
    doofaloofa's Avatar

    I'm Svelte!

    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Wesht Cark
    Posts
    3,247

    Achievements:
    1000 Experience PointsOverdriveTagger First ClassThree FriendsYour first Group

    Posted On:
    3/15/2013 12:28am

    supporting member
     Style: mma

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    DKJr

    Have your coaches been aware of your condition (for want of a better word)

    and did they change thier methods to suit you?
    Considered in the abstract the boxing ring is an altar of sorts, one of those legendary spaces where the laws of a nation are suspended: inside the ropes, during an officially regulated three-minute round, a man may be killed by his opponent's hands but he cannot be legally murdered. Boxing inhabits a sacred space predating civilization; or, to use D.H. Lawrence's phrase, before God was love. If it suggests a savage ceremony or a rite of atonement it also suggests the futility of such gestures. For what possible atonement is the fight waged if it must shortly be waged again... and again? The boxing match is the very image, the more terrifying for being so stylized, of mankind's collective aggression; its ongoing historical madness.
    Joyce Carol Oates, On Boxing
  6. DKJr is online now
    DKJr's Avatar

    Fasten your seat belts, and prepare for lift off

    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Dallas
    Posts
    3,201

    Points
    4,929
    Achievements:
    Three Friends1 year registeredTagger Second Class10000 Experience Points

    Posted On:
    3/15/2013 2:39am

    supporting member
     Style: Combat Cuddling

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by doofaloofa View Post
    DKJr

    Have your coaches been aware of your condition (for want of a better word)

    and did they change thier methods to suit you?
    No actually I've never mentioned it. I usually don't share it due to the stigma.

    More than anything I've had to learn to adapt my learning style. If I'd reccomend anything it'd be to show them a concept/technique and let them play and experiment with it, then drill it.

    My current coach indulges my "why do this instead of that? or what exactly makes this work?" which helps me understand where the important parts are to focus on then I play with them from there in my head automatically.
    Last edited by DKJr; 3/15/2013 2:43am at .
  7. Permalost is offline
    Permalost's Avatar

    pro nonsense self defense

    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    12,366

    Points
    16,726
    Achievements:
    10000 Experience PointsOverdrive
    Awards:
    Activity Champion

    Posted On:
    3/15/2013 6:01am

    supporting member
     Style: FMA, dumbek, Indian clubs

    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I remember when I taught kung fu, I had parents tell me their kids had ADHD, and the challenge was that the more time I'd take to keep that one kid's attention, the more I'd have to ignore the rest of the class for a second, and holding the flow and attention of a group of kids can be hard. In fact, it sometimes felt like putting kids in groups greater than 4 was automatically an attention challenge. So, I'd try to devise ways of getting attention quickly. One of them I'd use was quickly engaging them with a question- a kung fu question that they'd be able to answer, but would take a little bit of thinking, and I'd ask with a sense of urgency. This could start them on a new concentration stream when the one they're on is dissolving. I'd also lead them into fun activities that'd use the skills we were working on, like using their stancework to dodge foam bats I'd swing at them. That way, I could work on consistent themes throughout a class, while doing it in a way that was different.
  8. Cuddles is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Cuddleton
    Posts
    353

    Points
    709

    Posted On:
    3/15/2013 7:35am


     Style: HS Cuddling

    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by DKJr View Post
    I've had to learn to force myself to focus, but I'll often get off track and chase random ideas about grips and hip movement.

    How does it affect being coached?
    When I'm learning a technique I break it down and my mind searches for the weaknesses immediately, I just scan through all the inefficiencies and then bring it down to the basic concept of how it works.

    Coaching?
    I try my damn hardest not to let my mind work on overdrive and just spout technique and idea out. I usually just teach 2 techniques and try not to over indulge on details. This has all come through practice, I used to just randomly spit out everything I got excited about as it related to the technique.

    Does it bleed into my technical abilities?
    Honestly I feel it gives me an advantage, I focus on nothing and let repetition take over. If you roll with me you'll notice I'm erratic and constantly moving to either improve or finish. I'm never still....ever...
    I also have ADD, though no one but my best friend and I know. And now, all of you. But partial anonymity on the internet allows for this.

    I agree that the ability to break down a technique and find weaknesses is amazing. While training at Karate Kempo and the like though, I'd slow the class down by having a billion questions on every little detail of each movement.

    Just a random stray thought/example of a billion questions, ignore this and move on.
    Such as on a simple roundhouse to the midsection: Should I pivot this far or this little? Should I pivot with this bent this much or this little? Should I always commit my hip into the strike? Would it be okay if I hit with this part of the foot? While aiming at the ribs, is it better to have my feet at this angle or this angle to the opponent? Where should my hands be as I kick? How should my head be moving? Should I try to keep my body from swaying back naturally? What if my body were positioned differently because I had just thrown a cross? etc etc etc
    In the small bit that I rolled at the mma gym I trained at (for like a year), I think changing my focus helped a lot because I wouldn't get bogged down on a single idea, choke, submission, sweep. Though I disagree with the repetition part that DKJr posted. When I rolled, it felt instinctive as to how I should move. I found getting positioning to be far easier than doing a submission, even when we were practicing it without resistance.

    Okay! Enough of this rambling, I'm gonna answer the questions that DKJr answered.

    How does it affect my training?
    Well, I'm off of training atm because I'm currently playing High School Volleyball.
    Volleyball paragraph, feel free to skip.
    In volleyball, ADD isn't too much of a problem because plays are generally very short. I'm an Outside Hitter (guy who spikes the most) and a Libero (defensive specialist who wears a different colored shirt. It's because Liberos basically never get subbed out, so the Ref needs to know who it is. One Libero per team, even if he's benched)

    As a fun fact, my coach told me he read a sports science study that said that people can't focus on a single [moving?] object for more than 1.5 seconds. The best trained athletes showed focus on a single object for up to 3 seconds.

    Try throwing a ball in the air high enough that it'll take 2 seconds to fall back to you. You might notice your attention flicker for just a split second. (Those of us on the team sure did.)

    We use this theory for our easy lob serves. The more air time your floater has, the less perfect their bump will be, so try to lob it high and deep. Of course, normal serves and jump serves come very fast and hard.
    When I did train, during classes, I would sometimes fall apart and had to concentrate to finish up the class. Normally it wasn't a problem, but once I got bored... well I got bored. I'd often get told by the instructor to get back on task because I'd start doing different things.

    It affects forum posts because I end up typing out essays on different aspects of martial arts and have to delete them before posting or everyone would get lost. Much more than I would care to admit. Even those quoted skipped sections are not even half of what I typed out originally.

    How did it affect private lessons?

    Surprisingly, I was able to advance extremely quickly through material. However, I have to give credit to my Instructors rather than myself. Personally, I feel as if I have no talent in martial arts whatsoever. But I did notice early on that once I got focused on something, everything else would be shut out and I could focus on that one particular object for hours with ease. The main problem was actually focusing.

    Another quick example of random stuff. Feel free to skip the quoted section.
    A quick example of that would be when I was just hanging out at the dojo, playing with the bags, swords, mitts, weights, whatever I could get my hands on. Stacking them, balancing them, hitting them, doing squats while carrying them as weights, all of that nonsense.

    While I was , my Instructor was teaching this Brown belt a jumping spinning kick for a form (and for fun) that landed in a strange pose, but she couldn't do it after being shown 3 times.

    As such, my Instructor said, "Hey Cuddles, try to do this!" He did the technique while I was starting to look at him.
    "Can you do it one more time? I missed it"
    He does it again and I copied the kick almost perfectly. I messed up the placement of my right hand as the palm was supposed to face down, not up, as I landed.

    There was another cute girl who was like that, but only with staffs. I guess she just really like poles, I don't know. My Instructor showed her a part of a black belt staff form (7 movements in that part) and she copied it on the first try. DAMN. I had to watch three times to get the first two movements and even then, it was a complete mess. I was smacking my face trying to twirl the stick, hitting my toes, crossing my feet over...
    My sensei, being extremely good (though I disagree with some of his beliefs), was able to capitalize on this. He did his best to get the boring stuff done with quickly (forms, "defensive maneuvers", pre-set basic combos we just called "Kempo 1, 2, 3, and so on) and move on to fun mitt hitting, in-depth technique discussion, grappling, and occasional sparring.

    (I tend to ask too many questions about random things about techniques in group class. Privates let me ask all I want.)

    I refer to Kempo Karate because that's where I trained before Volleyball started.

    Does it bleed into my technical abilities?
    I feel like it gives me an advantage because I'm able to pick out the smaller details in the middle of a fight and I'm very fidgety in one, so I'm constantly moving. That means I can secure position better and can usually control the distance because of my constantly moving feet.

    I believe that's also why I fight both Orthodox and Southpaw. I switch between the two... just because.

    Of course, I'm a beginner, but it's because I'm a beginner that I feel like it helps a lot. More experienced fighters would probably have no problem whatsoever shutting down someone who just moves a bit more.
    Last edited by Cuddles; 3/15/2013 7:41am at .
  9. Permalost is offline
    Permalost's Avatar

    pro nonsense self defense

    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    12,366

    Points
    16,726
    Achievements:
    10000 Experience PointsOverdrive
    Awards:
    Activity Champion

    Posted On:
    3/15/2013 7:41am

    supporting member
     Style: FMA, dumbek, Indian clubs

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Cuddles View Post
    I also have ADD, though no one but my best friend and I know.
    So, have you been properly diagnosed or is this something you decided yourself?
  10. Cuddles is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Cuddleton
    Posts
    353

    Points
    709

    Posted On:
    3/15/2013 8:09am


     Style: HS Cuddling

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Permalost View Post
    So, have you been properly diagnosed or is this something you decided yourself?
    Diagnosed. I don't take meds though.

    Well I should've said my family as well, but I figured that was implied.
Page 1 of 3 1 23 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Powered by vBulletin™© contact@vbulletin.com vBulletin Solutions, Inc. 2011 All rights reserved.