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  1. Cuddles is online now

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    Posted On:
    3/12/2013 2:30pm


     Style: HS Cuddling

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    On-topic: Thanks for the pdf's, they were a fun read.
  2. itwasntme is online now
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    Posted On:
    3/13/2013 8:22am


     Style: being less stupid

    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I was asked to give my experiences in dealing with my ADHD in a PM. It was a rather vague question, or rather invitation, but I will do my best to address information others may be curious about.

    A little background on me - I was diagnosed with ADHD around the age of 4 or 5, I have been to many specialists and therapists over the years to try and deal with this issue, I have been on methamphetamines damn near since I was diagnosed until some time in middle school, then again for a short while in high school. I can assure you that dealing with this, especially as a child, is EXTREMELY rough. You start out life with a chip on your shoulder due to a lack of understanding; a lack of understanding of yourself, of others, of a great many issues.

    When I was much younger, I developed a tic. I could be sitting at the dinner table with my family and involuntarily start raising my arm and slamming it down into my side. I wouldn’t even notice. My parents would tell me about it, and I wouldn’t even know. I developed various tics from teeth-grinding, to doing weird **** with my eyes, even in the rhythm of my steps and various other craziness I can’t explain. I went to see numerous specialists; they put me on Ritalin at 6 years old and had me do various exercises on machines they would connect to my head with wires. Yes, I’m 6 years old and I already feel like Frankenstein, I know I’m different from everyone else and nothing seems to really be able to fix me.

    Around the time I’m 8 or 9, one of the specialists I’ve been seeing recommends that I switch school districts. Apparently, the city schools have teachers that are better equipped/ more properly able to deal with kids with my particular disability. Wanting to do whatever was best for their son, the obvious answer was to abide by the doctor’s suggestion, and away I went. My parents and I went to check out one of the city schools and talk with the 4th grade teachers. It was already decided that this was to be the school I attended, so we went over a 504 plan. For those who don’t know, at least in this area, a 504 plan outlines special circumstances allowed for specific children with problems like mine. I was allotted extra time on tests, made to sit at the front of the class, and other points I can’t recall at this time. Yet another way I got to stand out from my peers!

    A lot more than just teachers changed when I changed schools. I left behind all my friends, and entered into a completely different and new culture. At this point in my life, I realise that damn near every school, at least those in my area, are near a ‘hood. Both of the elementary schools were, except they were two different types. The first one I attended was near more trailor parks dominated by whites and hispanics, the second was predominantly black. White trash, southern-city slickers to “hood-rich” blacks and some well-to-do rich kids, definitely no one I fit in with. I made, literally, a handful of friends, 1 or 2 of whom I saw outside of school.

    This cycle repeated itself through high school. By this time I was an angry, out of control, drug addict. The first time I went downtown for questioning I was 12 years old. This lifestyle would follow me for a good while, luckily, somehow not leaving behind much along the lines of a paper trail. Eventually, I would adapt to my ADHD. I honestly can’t say if it began to regress as I got older, or if I did/do something in my unconscious mind to overcome this. The only thing I know I have done myself is to use to my advantage the fact that I am good at retaining information when I truly care about something. It’s still not always easy, but for a good number of things, I have been able to somehow instill an interest in myself.

    A few common effects of ADHD:
    1) Lack of focus
    2) Daydreaming
    3) Forgetfulness
    4) Inability to stay still

    Some facts about ADHD and those affected:
    1) Can lead to aggressive personalities
    2) Can lead to depression
    3) Tend to be visual learners

    I was pretty well caught off guard with this, so if anyone would like to ask any questions, feel free. In regards to what is said about martial arts and kids with ADD in the article entitled “40”, I’d have to say in my experience, that it is spot on. I see now how much better I am able to focus when I have exercised (I guess from killing energy). People with ADD tend to dive head first into things that interest them, so martial arts is likely no different. It would provide a good outlet for energy, aggression, and the ability to gain self-confidence from finally finding something you can learn with ease.
  3. doofaloofa is online now
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    Posted On:
    3/13/2013 11:25am

    Join us... or die
     Style: mma

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    IWM

    were you involved in MA's as a kid?
  4. itwasntme is online now
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    Posted On:
    3/13/2013 2:37pm


     Style: being less stupid

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    No. I was involved in other sports like soccer and basketball, but developed depression very early and didn't pursue either past around age 10. I played Lacrosse one season in middle school, which I loved, but I don't think the league ever took off. I don't know that martial arts is necessarily the fix, but a sport that a child enjoys and keeps them active would probably go a long way in helping to overcome the symptoms of ADHD.

    I wasn't personally fond of playing basketball or soccer, and for whatever reason, the trial class of krotty or TKD at a local McDojo didn't quite do it for me. I learned a snap kick and felt that was all I needed to know to kick anyone's ass. For the record, I have NEVER used that in a fight lol. It's imperative that a child with this condition not be forced into any activity, rather given as many options as possible that are feasible and available.

    As I said, I really enjoyed Lacrosse in middle school. I saw a huge boost in my confidence and happiness during my time playing. I was more active in school as well. I'm sure studies would find that physical activities in general would help children like this, even if the child did something like hiking.
  5. jdempsey is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/13/2013 4:24pm


     Style: lazy

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    A few common effects of ADHD:
    1) Lack of focus
    2) Daydreaming
    3) Forgetfulness
    4) Inability to stay still

    Some facts about ADHD and those affected:
    1) Can lead to aggressive personalities
    2) Can lead to depression
    3) Tend to be visual learners





    holy **** dude , this is me through and through, the tic (kinda) and all.I'll have to read that 40 article .
    Last edited by jdempsey; 3/13/2013 4:30pm at .
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