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  1. Miguel809 is offline

    Join Date
    Jan 2013
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    7

    Posted On:
    1/12/2013 10:49am

    Bullshido Newbie
     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    There are stories about fights that took place. It does describe techniques used, but it depends. Some of the stories people are pissed and just end up fighting with machetes out of rage. Other stories though are with people who had been in more than one machete fight and had experience fighting. It's like a macho, manly thing to fight someone with a sword compared to using a gun there (but they do use guns mostly). It describes how the island has a long history of warfare after Columbus arrived. It doesn't seem like the techniques are passed down in a school or anything, but are learned from family and friends generation to generation and used on the streets if they have to. However, they call these guys "Tigueres (not sure of spelling" means tiger but is equivelent to like a hustler in English...and supposedly they are the ones who really know how to fight and do so on the streets and in the prisons. There are people walking around there with machete scars to the face and missing fingers/limbs and things. They do have a certain way of fighting described in the book, they wrap one hand in a towel or shirt and put it behind their backs (to avoid the fingers/hand being hacked off I assume) and scrape their machetes along the concrete to intimidate their opponents. Not all fight like that but that is something that seems common.The way it is described is that its been going on for ages there...the machete is just a part of their culture.
  2. Miguel809 is offline

    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    7

    Posted On:
    1/12/2013 10:56am

    Bullshido Newbie
     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    There are stories about fights that took place. It does describe techniques used, but it depends. Some of the stories people are pissed and just end up fighting with machetes out of rage. Other stories though are with people who had been in more than one machete fight and had experience fighting. It's like a macho, manly thing to fight someone with a sword compared to using a gun there (but they do use guns mostly). It describes how the island has a long history of warfare after Columbus arrived. It doesn't seem like the techniques are passed down in a school or anything, but are learned from family and friends generation to generation and used on the streets if they have to. However, they call these guys "Tigueres (not sure of spelling" means tiger but is equivelent to like a hustler in English...and supposedly they are the ones who really know how to fight and do so on the streets and in the prisons. There are people walking around there with machete scars to the face and missing fingers/limbs and things. They do have a certain way of fighting described in the book, they wrap one hand in a towel or shirt and put it behind their backs (to avoid the fingers/hand being hacked off I assume) and scrape their machetes along the concrete to intimidate their opponents. Not all fight like that but that is something that seems common.The way it is described is that its been going on for ages there...the machete is just a part of their culture.
  3. Miguel809 is offline

    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    7

    Posted On:
    1/12/2013 1:36pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Diesel_tke View Post
    Some of that type of learning will obviously rule out stuff that doesn't work. But that doesn't mean that it will rule IN stuff that does work. They may be training in a few high percentage techniques that are effective and quick to learn. The problem that arises is when everyone learns those techniques. Then you fight to a stalemate. At that point you will need the intruduction of new, more advanced techniques. Those techniques wont just appear spontaneously. Someone will have to bring them in. That's why I think the idea is flawed.

    I would like to see these systems that are being used. Are techniques listed in the book or just obscure claims?
    There are stories about fights that took place. It does describe techniques used, but it depends. Some of the stories people are pissed and just end up fighting with machetes out of rage. Other stories though are with people who had been in more than one machete fight and had experience fighting. It's like a macho, manly thing to fight someone with a sword compared to using a gun there (but they do use guns mostly).

    It describes how the island has a long history of warfare after Colombus arrived. It doesn't seem like the techniques are passed down in a school or anything, but are learned from family and friends generation to generation and used on the streets if they have to. However, they call these guys "Tigueres (not sure of spelling" means tiger but is equivelent to like a hustler in English) and supposedly they are the ones who really know how to fight and do so on the streets and in the prisons. There are people walking around there with machete scars to the face and missing fingers/limbs and things. They do have a certain way of fighting described in the book, they wrap one hand in a towel or shirt and put it behind their backs (to avoid the fingers/hand being hacked off I assume) and scrape their machetes along the concrete to intimidate their opponents. Not all fight like that but that is something that seems common.The way it is described is that its been going on for ages there...the machete is just a part of their culture.
  4. ChuckWepner is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Chicago / Michigan
    Posts
    391

    Posted On:
    1/12/2013 10:24pm


     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Miguel809 View Post
    I did some research, looks like the author has three books out there all of which are paperback and ebooks. From the website:

    danieldimarzio.com
    You checked the author's own website, then you come back and say that that constitutes "doing some research"? Unsurprisingly, the author reports about himself that he is a reliable source.

    None of his books have been published by anyone other than him. Lulu.com, his listed "publisher," is a "publish on demand" website. That is, they are not a publisher, or even a vanity press. They are a website that facilitates self-publishing by selling printing services to people who want to be authors. If I typed 100 pages of gibberish with my eyes closed and was willing to pay the fees for formatting and binding, etc., I would (by your standards) then be the published author of Chuck Wepner, hahqehahfqaWQQ3CCGV (Lulu.com, 2013).

    http://www.lulu.com/shop/search.ep?contributorId=451738
    http://www.lulu.com/us/en/about

    This doesn't necessarily mean that what he publishes isn't true, but it does mean that there was not the acquisitions review, editorial process, and post-publication reviewing and discussion that would typically occur with an actual publisher. He also has no training (or at least hides any training if he has it) as an historian, journalist, researcher, etc.; his education is in business administration.

    As for the ninja stuff, if your spidey sense doesn't tingle when someone says "secret, 1000-year-old, military ninjutsu tradition," your level of credulity and gullibility must be so high that nothing I can say here would help you.

    I wish you much success in life, and hope that your many future transactions involving helping Nigerian banking officials transfer millions of dollars from unclaimed accounts, if you will just supply your account number and sort code please, bring you wealth and happiness.
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