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  1. BKR is online now
    BKR's Avatar

    My dog is cuter and smarter than yours.

    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    Bonners Ferry, Idaho
    Posts
    4,333

    Posted On:
    1/15/2013 7:19pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Kodokan Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by judoratt View Post
    You could be saying this in 30 years.
    I sure as hell am!
    Falling for Judo since 1980
  2. afterthefall is offline

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    Posted On:
    2/06/2013 12:19am

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Budo_Brown View Post
    I plan on training at the Obukan. You gave it a good reference, the review looked good, and it's history alone speaks for itself.
    Its a solid place with an amazing history, and it won't break the bank if you are already training elsewhere. You definitely should; I have been there about a year and I'm very happy all in all. I train a little less now than I'd like due to school, but you really can't go wrong.

    edit: didn't see either that you were brand new. Give it a year and then start x-training, by waiting you'll do better at both than if you jump in this early.
    Last edited by afterthefall; 2/06/2013 12:25am at .
  3. patfromlogan is offline
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    Heavyweight

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    Hilo Island of Hawaii
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    Posted On:
    2/06/2013 2:30am

    supporting member
     Style: Kyokushinkai / Kajukenbo

    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Thanks for the info about kk in Utah. We were pretty isolated.

    But to the OP's thread I would add that I started in a tma karate 40 years ago in Hawaii and the top bbs had cross trained, usually in Judo. We were told tha if you were serious about training, after getting shodan or nidan one should go for a shodan in JJ or Judo. This is of course with the expectation that the student would continue with karate as their base art.
    "Preparing mentally, the most important thing is, if you aren't doing it for the love of it, then don't do it." - Benny Urquidez
  4. Budo_Brown is offline

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    Nov 2012
    Location
    Portland, Oregon- United States
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    Posted On:
    2/06/2013 5:13am


     Style: Kyokushin Karate

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by patfromlogan View Post
    Thanks for the info about kk in Utah. We were pretty isolated.

    But to the OP's thread I would add that I started in a tma karate 40 years ago in Hawaii and the top bbs had cross trained, usually in Judo. We were told tha if you were serious about training, after getting shodan or nidan one should go for a shodan in JJ or Judo. This is of course with the expectation that the student would continue with karate as their base art.
    My Shihan has allowed a Hakkoryu Jujutsu Kaiden Shihan Sandaikichu to begin teaching classes twice a week. Our Shihan encourges us all to attend the Jujutsu classes. I've been training Kyokushin 3-4 days a week since dec and Hakkoryu 2 days a week since Jan. If I keep up this training pace then I should be able to obtain my Shodan in both within 3-4 years. Fortunately, the Shihan teaching Jujutsu is also a 4th dan in Judo and holds a Shodan in Goju Ryu. He holds Dan ranking in two other kinds of Japanese Jujutsu but I don't recall the Ryu. He likes to show us variations of the traditional technique that use technique from Judo or Karate. Although, we do not train the Jujutsu alive, the techniques I'm learning transfer well into the sercurity aspect of working in a nightclub as I do still at times. The kyokushin training is plenty traditional and plenty alive though ;)
  5. whatever123 is offline

    Registered Member

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    Nov 2008
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    98

    Posted On:
    2/06/2013 11:19am


     Style: KK TKD GJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Budo_Brown View Post
    My Shihan has allowed a Hakkoryu Jujutsu Kaiden Shihan Sandaikichu to begin teaching classes twice a week. Our Shihan encourges us all to attend the Jujutsu classes. I've been training Kyokushin 3-4 days a week since dec and Hakkoryu 2 days a week since Jan. If I keep up this training pace then I should be able to obtain my Shodan in both within 3-4 years. Fortunately, the Shihan teaching Jujutsu is also a 4th dan in Judo and holds a Shodan in Goju Ryu. He holds Dan ranking in two other kinds of Japanese Jujutsu but I don't recall the Ryu. He likes to show us variations of the traditional technique that use technique from Judo or Karate. Although, we do not train the Jujutsu alive, the techniques I'm learning transfer well into the sercurity aspect of working in a nightclub as I do still at times. The kyokushin training is plenty traditional and plenty alive though ;)

    Did you cancel your participation in the tournament?

    If not why are you cross training?

    shouldn't you be focusing on your tournament?
  6. Budo_Brown is offline

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    Posted On:
    2/06/2013 1:34pm


     Style: Kyokushin Karate

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by whatever123 View Post
    Did you cancel your participation in the tournament?

    If not why are you cross training?

    shouldn't you be focusing on your tournament?

    No, I didn't cancel my tournament participation. The Jujutsu classes directly follow Kyokushin class on Tuesday and Saturday. They are both in the same dojo so I just stay after kyokushin class and train Jujutsu as well. I'm very focused on my tournament . I workout daily at home as well.
  7. whatever123 is offline

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    Posted On:
    2/06/2013 2:22pm


     Style: KK TKD GJJ

    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I don't know. But if I had a tournament & I'm a beginner in a martial art style I would use any extra time I have to either train or recover from training depending on my schedule.

    Good luck
  8. Budo_Brown is offline

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    Posted On:
    2/06/2013 5:49pm


     Style: Kyokushin Karate

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I understand where you are coming from. I also appreciate your perspective. I also trust my Shihan and senior students. There's a lot of tournament experience in my dojo. We train hard, we train old school Japanese style. For instance yesterday's class started with us conditioning our shins by hitting them lightly then harder with wooden bats. Not full swings or anything close but enough to bruise and build. We then traded low kicks and blocking bone to bone. The entire class was full contact kumite drills. Believe me, Jujutsu class is resting after Kyokushin training at our dojo. We'll slow down a little closer to the tournament but for now. It's go hard or go home.
  9. Budo_Brown is offline

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    Posted On:
    2/06/2013 6:08pm


     Style: Kyokushin Karate

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Also, to clarify. It's Hakkoryu Jujutsu. Joint manipulation, locks, and throws. There's little to no ground grappling from what I've seen thus far. That being the case, it's not as hard on the body as BJJ or GJJ.
  10. silvers_ghost is offline

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    Jun 2013
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    Posted On:
    6/09/2013 7:40pm


     Style: Kyokushin

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    From my own experience I can say that cross training can become fairly organic in its growth.

    That said, I definitely agree with the earlier posters who suggested that you should have a firm grounding (shodan level) in one art before branching into another. However, at the early levels it is possible to have the time to do a bit of this and a bit of that, as the demands of the art on the student are not as pressing. I found at about 5th kyu I not only found it impossible to not focus solely on my Kyokushin training, but also that I didn't want to. After Shodan I now feel much more relaxed about branching out again and incorporating other arts into my Kyokushin "core".

    Let it happen - you'll know when and where and what to focus on when the time is right.

    I also agree that there are some arts that can be cross trained quite easily - I trained BJJ for years with my karate as they were so disparate that there was no conflict whatsoever. I only stopped the BJJ because my heart was with Kyokushin. There are others though that could possibly cause great confusion to a novice martial artist. I'm currently undertaking aikido - if I had of attempted to blend this with Kyokushin training at the early stages I would have been hopelessly lost.
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