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  1. SpamN'Cheese is offline

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    Posted On:
    12/17/2012 2:41pm


     Style: Karate, Boxing, BJJ noob

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Awesome videos.
  2. Joz is offline

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    Posted On:
    12/17/2012 11:25pm


     Style: Judo

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gosai View Post
    During a judo lesson some days ago, the instructor for that class made an offhanded remark that "I don't know why, but it seems most of the guys in the dojo are counter fighters." which certainly seems in the spirit of Judo to this mediocre orange belt...
    Repeat after me...

    There are no winners in Randori.
    There are no winners in Randori.
    There are no winners in Randori.
    There are no winners in....

    The best thing you can do as a beginner is attack constantly. You will get countered other orange belts might "win" that round of randori but you will get better at attacking and pretty soon you will be throwing them rather than vice versa. Because everytime they counter you you can learn something about what you did wrong and all they are doing is the same thing that worked for them before...

    The point isn't to be the most dominant orange belt in the dojo....

    But, that did get me thinking: that being the case, it seems it would be fun to change up my style and try to work more aggressive and create opportunities and yadda yadda.

    So, given my relative lack of information on the subject: can anyone recommend a few Judoka with a more aggressive style of play than is average? I figure I might be able to take some inspiration and study from them
    Good line of thought that just keep it up long enough to learn from your mistakes...

    As for aggressive players I'd suggest Ryoko Tamura Tani

    Last edited by Joz; 12/17/2012 11:31pm at .
  3. Gosai is offline

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    Posted On:
    12/18/2012 3:06am


     Style: Ju d'oh!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Joz View Post
    There are no winners in Randori.

    The best thing you can do as a beginner is attack constantly. You will get countered other orange belts might "win" that round of randori but you will get better at attacking and pretty soon you will be throwing them rather than vice versa. Because everytime they counter you you can learn something about what you did wrong and all they are doing is the same thing that worked for them before...

    Good line of thought that just keep it up long enough to learn from your mistakes...
    I'll do my best to keep that in mind. And thanks for the suggestions to the people who have contributed to my gibberish, haha.
  4. BKR is online now
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    My dog is cuter and smarter than yours.

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    Posted On:
    12/19/2012 1:55pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Kodokan Judo

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gosai View Post
    During a judo lesson some days ago, the instructor for that class made an offhanded remark that "I don't know why, but it seems most of the guys in the dojo are counter fighters." which certainly seems in the spirit of Judo to this mediocre orange belt...

    But, that did get me thinking: that being the case, it seems it would be fun to change up my style and try to work more aggressive and create opportunities and yadda yadda.

    So, given my relative lack of information on the subject: can anyone recommend a few Judoka with a more aggressive style of play than is average? I figure I might be able to take some inspiration and study from them.
    I would bet how they are taught Judo and practice Judo has a lot to do with them being counter fighters. It's one reason I don't teach counter throws per se to beginners.

    Being a counter fighter in a judo shiai will get you a loss by passivity penalties more often than not.

    I'm really kind of puzzled by your post. Being a "counter fighter" went out with the new passivity rules back in the late 70s.
    Falling for Judo since 1980
  5. BKR is online now
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    My dog is cuter and smarter than yours.

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    Posted On:
    12/19/2012 1:56pm

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     Style: Kodokan Judo

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    Quote Originally Posted by The_Wintersoldier View Post



    You don't get too much more aggressive than Dr. Ferguson
    Oh, yes you can, indeed, you can.
    Falling for Judo since 1980
  6. BKR is online now
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    My dog is cuter and smarter than yours.

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    Posted On:
    12/19/2012 2:00pm

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     Style: Kodokan Judo

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    In order to be aggressive (attack a lot) you will need to be able to do Judo. Start training by throwing and emphasize throwing while moving, throwing in combination with other throws. Just being aggressive without any Judo base won't do you much if any good. And follow through to ne waza a lot, transitions up the level of 'aggression" quite a bit.

    This sort of training may not appeal to your fellow judoka, though.

    Ben
    Falling for Judo since 1980
  7. judoka_uk is offline
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    Posted On:
    12/21/2012 6:16pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Judo

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Gosai View Post
    During a judo lesson some days ago, the instructor for that class made an offhanded remark that "I don't know why, but it seems most of the guys in the dojo are counter fighters." which certainly seems in the spirit of Judo to this mediocre orange belt...
    The counter cancer does seem to set in around Orange belt. You then meet green and blue belts who proudly announce themselves as 'counter fighters', they never make dan grade and drop out of the sport a few months or years later.

    The cause of counter cancer is instructors teaching counters to people below blue/ brown belt.

    These beginners then spend their randoris stiff arming until the other attempts an attack, then they wrap themselves around them and drag them to the floor in an ugly heap. Thus the 'counter fighter' is born.

    If you ever want to be good at Judo, ban yourself from doing counters, drops and makikomi until you have your dan grade.

    Concentrate on pro-actively throwing with upright positive techniques, you can thank me when you've got your dan grade and aren't some Judo tard who's an embarrasment to the grade.
  8. judoka_uk is offline
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    Posted On:
    12/21/2012 6:20pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Judo

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Oh and being aggressive doesn't mean jerking and tugging on your randori partners gi like a demented ape.

    It means repeated, regularly and committed attacks with basic techniques from a standard grip with good posture.

    Far too many beginners spazz out jerking and tugging the gi every which way as a substitute for aggressive attacking
  9. Gosai is offline

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    Posted On:
    12/21/2012 6:43pm


     Style: Ju d'oh!

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Solid advice Judoka_uk. I keep meaning to read more of your blog, as it seems to come highly recommended amongst the Judoka on the sight, but somehow frequently wind up distracted. The advice throughout this thread (and the videos) has certainly gone beyond what I'd expected (along the lines of 'Do randori. Keep trying techniques.' from every poster haha)

    I've been out of the game the past bit due to an illness of uncertain communicability, but when next I'm in the dojo I'll try and take the advice to heart. Shame about the 'ban yourself from makikomi' advice though, one of the instructors showed me soto makikomi after commenting it seemed like it would fit my body type.

    Well... I'll find some technique to have fun with.
  10. judoka_uk is offline
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    Posted On:
    12/21/2012 7:02pm

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     Style: Judo

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gosai View Post
    Solid advice Judoka_uk. I keep meaning to read more of your blog, as it seems to come highly recommended amongst the Judoka on the sight, but somehow frequently wind up distracted.
    Thanks.

    Lucky to have had mentors who were not only good coaches, but good educationalists who steered me down the right path.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gosai View Post
    Shame about the 'ban yourself from makikomi' advice though, one of the instructors showed me soto makikomi after commenting it seemed like it would fit my body type.

    Well... I'll find some technique to have fun with.
    Ban yourself from makikomi until black belt, important distinction.

    Assumption being that by the time you've reached black belt you'll have spent enough time on basic techniques to be able to successfully branch out into Makikomi without compromising your long term development.

    My experience is not to listen to body type technique selection advice unless it's something like 'Avoid Morote seoi nage, because you're 8ft tall and everyone in the club is 5ft5'
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