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  1. ChokeAJudoka is offline

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    Jun 2013
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    Ohio
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    Posted On:
    6/29/2013 12:40pm


     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by It is Fake View Post
    You aren't Owlmatt, who doof just questioned in his post. Trust me, If I disagree with you, I'll name you and quote your post.
    My apologies, doof corrected this for me!
  2. peteofred is offline

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    Posted On:
    7/06/2013 8:44am


     Style: Escrima, JKD, Iaido, LINE

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Well...why not. Learning and understanding a new language is on the track of self-improvement. Isn't that really what martial-arts is all about?
    If you learn fencing (classical or sport) you tend to learn a great deal of French.
    Though one of my senseis preferred English speakers to use English only, and he was Japanese, so I guess it comes down to Dojo/school preference.
  3. AKRhino is offline
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    Posted On:
    7/09/2013 7:27pm


     Style: Brazillian Jiu Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I personally have no interest in learning about Japanese culture, traditions, or language. I'm not one for bowing/ceremonial stuff either (though I do bow when I have to, such as at Tournaments). If I wanted to learn Japanese, I'd take a Japanese language class.

    This was something that I really hated when I did Aikido (for the few months that I did Aikido). It was frustrating to me, being there to learn a martial art and having to sit through what seemed like half the class meditating, or bowing to some picture instead of actually drilling/learning.

    It's something I see in Judo a little bit, though my gym and coaches are pretty laid back when it comes to things like this. From what I understand the testing requirements (USJA) were recently revised, and they used to require far more Japanese language knowledge. I don't mind using technique names, but that's the extent of what I'm really interested in knowing.
  4. ccwscott is offline

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    Mar 2012
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    Posted On:
    7/10/2013 11:08am


     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by AKRhino View Post
    I personally have no interest in learning about Japanese culture, traditions, or language. I'm not one for bowing/ceremonial stuff either (though I do bow when I have to, such as at Tournaments). If I wanted to learn Japanese, I'd take a Japanese language class.

    This was something that I really hated when I did Aikido (for the few months that I did Aikido). It was frustrating to me, being there to learn a martial art and having to sit through what seemed like half the class meditating, or bowing to some picture instead of actually drilling/learning.

    It's something I see in Judo a little bit, though my gym and coaches are pretty laid back when it comes to things like this. From what I understand the testing requirements (USJA) were recently revised, and they used to require far more Japanese language knowledge. I don't mind using technique names, but that's the extent of what I'm really interested in knowing.
    It's also good to know the referee commands like to start and stop and such.
  5. artsofjapan is offline

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    Posted On:
    7/21/2013 8:21pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: KodokanJudo+KokikaiAikido

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Japanese in the Dojo

    I think it is certainly quite important to teach Japanese in the Dojo. It is showing respect for the founders of the art.
  6. DARPAChief is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/05/2013 7:00am


     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by ChokeAJudoka View Post
    Describing Judo as merely simple body mechanics, in my opinion, reflects a limited understanding of what Judo (or other "-do" disciplines) are. Accomplishment of technique, art, or trick without the presence of significant moral, mental and spiritual attributes constitutes something entirely useless (unless you happen to be a cage fighter).

    As far as the technique itself goes, well, comparing that Cornish Wrestling video to a video of Kodokan Judoka speaks for itself. To quote an instructor I saw somewhere,"If all you want to do is work hard, you can put on roller skates and stumble around if you want - but this is all about building a Ferrari."

    Would you say Mexican and French cuisine are the same because they are both food?
    I contest the idea that Judo is exceptional moral training. I am aware of Kano's principles "jita-kyoei" and "seiryoku-zen'yo", and that his egalitarian approach to training was a socially beneficial development for Meiji-era Japanese, but beyond that I cannot seem to locate any comprehensive, codified Judo-specific philosophy.

    Barring the existence of such an authoritative article, Judo is not only equal to other sports and combat sports in that its character-building performance is contingent on leadership and community (let's not forget that for all his efforts, modern Budo including Judo were co-opted into Japanese fascism within Kano's lifetime), but that it is in fact less moralistic compared to classical arts, which did formulate their own views on many matters.
  7. Byakuya is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/06/2013 3:56pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Kyokushin

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by artsofjapan View Post
    I think it is certainly quite important to teach Japanese in the Dojo. It is showing respect for the founders of the art.
    I agree with you.
    one of the reasons for the Japanese terms is that you could theoretically walk into a dojo anywhere in the world and be able to train with them.

    Sorry if this have been mentioned before, I didn't read the entire thread.
  8. Permalost is online now
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    pro nonsense self defense

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    Nov 2012
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    San Diego
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    Posted On:
    8/06/2013 4:14pm

    supporting member
     Style: FMA, dumbek, Indian clubs

    -1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by artsofjapan View Post
    I think it is certainly quite important to teach Japanese in the Dojo. It is showing respect for the founders of the art.
    How does using the language show respect for the founders of the art? Those founders didn't invent Japanese, they spoke it because its the local language.
  9. OwlMatt is offline

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    Jan 2010
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    Milwaukee, WI
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    Posted On:
    8/06/2013 4:41pm


     Style: aikido

    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Permalost View Post
    How does using the language show respect for the founders of the art? Those founders didn't invent Japanese, they spoke it because its the local language.
    It doesn't, of course. I suspect AOJ is relatively new to MAs and is still drinking the sensei's KoolAid.

    Sent from my SPH-D710 using Bullshido - No BS MMA mobile app
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