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  1. #101

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    Dec 2004
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    Ohio
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    447
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Bondy
    These things need to be upheld , I once went to a class and I entered the class where they were playing"number of the beast" by iron maiden this was just not right.
    Wait, why isn't this right? (Sorry if it's been answered) I mean, I've seen at least one dojo ring a gong and light incense befvore training. What's wrong with music while training?

  2. #102

    Join Date
    Oct 2011
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    Fargo, North Dakota
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    192
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Gosai View Post
    Wait, why isn't this right? (Sorry if it's been answered) I mean, I've seen at least one dojo ring a gong and light incense befvore training. What's wrong with music while training?
    Nothing as far as I know. Personaly I think it would be pretty sweet to be able to have some tunes going, maybe I will ask if I can bring in a little stereo during open mat.

    The only issue that might come up is peoples differing musical tastes and the possibility of offending someone depending on the artist.

  3. #103

    Join Date
    Feb 2009
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    491
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Gosai View Post
    Wait, why isn't this right? (Sorry if it's been answered) I mean, I've seen at least one dojo ring a gong and light incense befvore training. What's wrong with music while training?
    I tend to find it greatly distracting, so I try to tune it out. I can understand how it might help others relax and focus, though. However, it could also conflict with the austerity germane to budo training in a dojo; on the flip side, if you train strictly combat sports in a gym, then you don't need to be mindful of that.

  4. #104

    Join Date
    Dec 2008
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    San Diego
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I learned technique names in Japan so I kind of expect them to be spoken in Japanese. When I teach, I use an English equivalent and I also say the Japanese words and provide them in a written form. I tell my students, "if you go to Japan, you should know these names" but if they don't, why worry? The language is secondary to the art. No one demands you use English when teaching basketball in Japan...

  5. #105
    Rock Ape's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    10,134
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I'm late in on this one so apologies.

    Japanese language taught as part of a Japanese system.

    Provided the teacher can actually pronounce the terminology and more to the point really understands what those terms/words and phrases mean then great, teach them however, the problem lay in the inevitable fact that Nihongo is a complex language, and, like anything, be it a physical technique, it's only as good and accurate as the teacher's understanding and ability to pass that information on.

    I always remember one gendai budo teacher proclaiming "kazar... kazar" ... "you're supposed to be cutting diagonal !!!"

    "Kessa" giri is what he was supposed to be saying.

    Teach martial arts related language if it's accurate, if not stick to your native language.
    "To sin by silence when one should protest makes cowards out of men".

    ~Ella Wheeler

  6. #106
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I prefer the use of Japanese, I find it flows well with breathing, execution of technique and mindset.

  7. #107

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    Feb 2008
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    Ireland
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Guido Gonzalles View Post
    I prefer the use of Japanese, I find it flows well with breathing, execution of technique and mindset.
    I'm not sure I understand that point. Would you saw yoko geri "flows better with breathing, execution of technique" than say side kick would?

  8. #108

    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by realjanuary View Post
    I'm not sure I understand that point. Would you saw yoko geri "flows better with breathing, execution of technique" than say side kick would?
    Yoko?

    Oh no.

  9. #109

    Join Date
    May 2013
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    UK
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    28
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I once had a sensei who was Russian, every technique - he named in English, Japanese and Russian

  10. #110

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    Jun 2013
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    Stockholm, Sweden
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    As I see it, the main upside of teaching Japanese terminology in training is, as has been mentioned earlier in the thread, to make it easier for people that don't share nationalities to still understand one another without creating the need for someone who doesn't speak very good English to learn the English equivalent for a bunch of techniques.

    This is useful not only when going from school to school within the same martial art, but also across different MAs with the same background (in this case, Japanese); I haven't practiced Karate for a moment of my life, but if someone talks about gyaku geri (no clue if this actually exists) I can get an idea of what the technique entails, being that I have an understanding for what the individual words mean.

    That said, having the instructor say "Alright, we're gonna drill Kote Gaeshi!" followed by half the class going "Uh, is that the one where you twist the...?" is just annoying, and can hamper the progress of otherwise talented individuals, so a degree of restraint and understanding is essential on the part of the instructor.

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