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  1. #51
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    BKR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NeilG View Post
    You use oikomi to mean dashing in for judo? In kendo it means a repeated attack in quick succession with the same technique.
    Yes, oikomi is used to denote driving in towards uke rather than turning away (hikidashi).

    They are not common terms outside of Japan.

    Ben
    Falling for Judo since 1980

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by NeilG View Post
    Then it's the same meaning as for kendo, keep bashing away until one lands. The oikomi term can also apply to combination waza, so for example you could do kouchi/ouchi repeatedly.
    In Judo, combination technques applied in the same direction is known as renzoku waza. Combination technique that changes direction is renraku waza.

    So Kouchi-Ouchi would be renzoku waza. Kouchi Gari-Seoi Nage would be renraku waza.

    Ben
    Falling for Judo since 1980

  3. #53
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    There are common types of ashi sabaki (footwork) used for Ouchi Gari.

    These will be for a righty.

    1.) Simply step forward with the left foot, usually driving it into the ground quickly, on the ball of your foot. Execute the handwork etc and cut uke leg with your right leg.

    2.) The other is a "T-Step" (I understand this is what Okano Sensei calls it), the "classic" where you lead with your right foot, usually to the top of the infamous triangle or thereabouts (varies depending on exact situation...here its basic), bring up your trailing leg next to or behind the lead leg, and drive towards uke. The feet/legs basically trade places, the better you are the faster and lighter the action

    The utility of the T-Step is that you can do kouchi or ouchi, plus, the first part (with the lead leg) is essentially what you do in basic tsurikomi action (lead leg to top of triangle...in front of uke), then pivoting on the lead leg, for forward throws. You snap your hip and do a sort of front kick downwards into the tatami.

    The idea is to use the same sort of initial movement for both forward and backwards (or sideways) throws. Hence, uke doesn't know which direction you intend to go.

    And at higher levels, neither does tori until he feels uke reaction to the initial movement.

    That's a long ways off for most of us ,though.

    Ben
    Falling for Judo since 1980

  4. #54

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    With BKR dropping serious knowledge, I almost feel silly saying anything in this thread. But, as a fellow tall noob, I figured it would be a good place to share any little things that have helped me.

    This past practice we were working on a seoi o toshi/drop seoi nage. The instructer had us taking an almost wrestling-style penetration step to get deep so we would get low and sort of slide under uke.

    While I am probably not qualified to be drop-kneeing anyone yet, the deep level changing step worked great for getting low enough to pull off the seoi nage on a shorter uke. I am going to try and work that level-change step (deep or otherwise) into other throws that I struggle to get low enough on (so... all of them).

    Hope that is a helpful hint. I am sure our more experience Judoka can take the "get low" concept and run with it.

  5. #55

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    Ben, thank you again. I found a Koga video where he illustrates the same points. I was stepping too far into the triangle and hence not enough room.

  6. #56
    I feel like you eyeballin' me, dawg!
    DarkPhoenix's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Krijgsman View Post
    With BKR dropping serious knowledge, I almost feel silly saying anything in this thread. But, as a fellow tall noob, I figured it would be a good place to share any little things that have helped me.

    This past practice we were working on a seoi o toshi/drop seoi nage. The instructer had us taking an almost wrestling-style penetration step to get deep so we would get low and sort of slide under uke.

    While I am probably not qualified to be drop-kneeing anyone yet, the deep level changing step worked great for getting low enough to pull off the seoi nage on a shorter uke. I am going to try and work that level-change step (deep or otherwise) into other throws that I struggle to get low enough on (so... all of them).

    Hope that is a helpful hint. I am sure our more experience Judoka can take the "get low" concept and run with it.
    I avoid teaching ANYONE a drop knee seoi nage because think it actually means dropping to their knees. You do that, you actually leave yourself open to a pretty hellacious choke at worse. My two go to throws as a tall guy are tai otoshi and harai ogoshi. Seoi toshi is another that I experiment with from time to time, but I am still on the balls of my feet when doing it. Think tai otoshi but the entry is an ippon seoi nage.
    I feel like you eye-bawlin' me, dawg!

  7. #57

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    Quote Originally Posted by faixabranca View Post
    Ben, thank you again. I found a Koga video where he illustrates the same points. I was stepping too far into the triangle and hence not enough room.
    On furthur reflection, here's what I did a couple Tuesdays ago:

    1. Walk normally, then drive off the left forward.
    2. Step right in, bringing left foot briefly just behind.
    3. Pull uke in, chest contact & circle my right foot.

    The end effect kinda vaguely seemed like Yamashita's in the Kodokan nagewaza vid...kind of ken ken, driving. Kind of like variation #1?

  8. #58

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    Quote Originally Posted by DarkPhoenix View Post
    I avoid teaching ANYONE a drop knee seoi nage because think it actually means dropping to their knees. You do that, you actually leave yourself open to a pretty hellacious choke at worse. My two go to throws as a tall guy are tai otoshi and harai ogoshi. Seoi toshi is another that I experiment with from time to time, but I am still on the balls of my feet when doing it. Think tai otoshi but the entry is an ippon seoi nage.

    Yah, my first club was really against the drop knee. Using the step sequence that was being taught without actually dropping to the knees was more what I was advocating, because of the way it naturally lead to dropping the hips low.

    Its messed up, by morote seoi nage is one of my best throws. It just clicked really early for me. I am improving my harai goshi though. And my tai otoshi is so bad that last time I was working on it I dislocated my toe and was out for like a month.

  9. #59
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  10. #60

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    Thanks, J_UK.

    I realized also that when I've a good partner, I am more sucessful in practice. About 90% of my fellow white belts are still stiff when uke-ing. I try not to, but am not always relaxed.

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