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  1. faixabranca is offline

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    Posted On:
    5/13/2013 8:01am


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Dude, most kung fu is taught really badly. If you want to study Tai chi, Bagua etc that's cool, but I highly suggest Kyokushin.

    I trained in Gojukai and it was kind of crappy. Every Kyokushin guy that I met was at least competent. Its that whole live sparring keeping it realistic thing.
  2. Southpaw86 is offline

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    Posted On:
    5/13/2013 7:15pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Seiryuu View Post
    Japanese Jujitsu is something I only heard of but haven't seen. It's not standup so I do not think it is what you may be looking for.

    Kyokushin and Seidokaikan are really good for learning to fight stand up. Seidokaikan does little kata and kyokushin does just a bit less kata than Goju. Since I do Goju, I just want to say that Goju schools vary greatly, even within organizations. My Meibukan dojo starts us off with point sparring and once we develope a base for technique, we move onto full contact (irikumi go) sparring where anything goes. Most dojos within the Meibukan organization do not do that. If you are looking for a tournament fighting style go with Seidokaikan. If you want a bit more kata and bunkai, go with kyokushin. If you want a lot of kata and bunkai analysis with irikumi (if the curriculum of the Goju school has it, go with that dojo.
    Japanese jujutsu is stand up, grappling, throws, strikes, and holds, personally an all around art IMO. Some of the modern japanese jujitsu schools even have open mat & no gi grappling since BJJ is the craze these days. Any school that has an open sparring is gonna to be better than one that does not!!!! You learn so much more by actually doing.. I do anyways.
    Last edited by Southpaw86; 5/13/2013 7:19pm at .
  3. OwlMatt is offline

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    Posted On:
    5/17/2013 9:50am


     Style: aikido

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I don't know much about Seidokai.

    Kyokushin is a style with a heavy emphasis on full-contact sparring. Not really my cup of tea, but a good way to go if you're looking for real fighting. Sparring is also probably the best cardio workout in stand-up martial arts; I used to do TKD and two minutes of sparring will gas you more than half an hour on a bike.

    Goju, as it was originally developed, is a hard/soft style with an emphasis on kata, one-step drills, and strength conditioning. Nowadays a school that calls itself Goju could be anything, so check the place out thoroughly.

    Jujutsu is another thing that could be anything. Literally, jujutsu is the traditional Japanese grappling from which judo, aikido, BJJ, etc. evolved; it generally is done mostly from standing and contains more striking (and sometimes weapons) than any of its descendants. But these days, the word can mean many different things. Lately I've been noticing that a lot of guys who want to sound like BJJ instructors but lack the credentials are saying that they teach jujitsu. Like the above, check it out.
  4. Southpaw86 is offline

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    Posted On:
    5/17/2013 1:19pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by OwlMatt View Post
    I don't know much about Seidokai.

    Jujutsu is another thing that could be anything. Literally, jujutsu is the traditional Japanese grappling from which judo, aikido, BJJ, etc. evolved; it generally is done mostly from standing and contains more striking (and sometimes weapons) than any of its descendants. But these days, the word can mean many different things. Lately I've been noticing that a lot of guys who want to sound like BJJ instructors but lack the credentials are saying that they teach jujitsu. Like the above, check it out.
    Never said anything about instructors teaching BJJ that were not qualified, never said anything about BJJ being taught period, don't try to read whats not there. You misunderstood my post, perhaps I wrote it poorly, I was just trying to say that some jujitsu places allow free sparring, and there is nothing wrong with that and It does not mean they are teaching BJJ or trying to be like it, I just meant with MMA being a big thing these days, more schools are encouraging friendly competition and full contact. Which again is a GOOD thing.
    Last edited by Southpaw86; 5/17/2013 1:49pm at .
  5. OwlMatt is offline

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    Posted On:
    5/17/2013 2:25pm


     Style: aikido

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Southpaw86 View Post
    Never said anything about instructors teaching BJJ that were not qualified, never said anything about BJJ being taught period, don't try to read whats not there. You misunderstood my post, perhaps I wrote it poorly, I was just trying to say that some jujitsu places allow free sparring, and there is nothing wrong with that and It does not mean they are teaching BJJ or trying to be like it, I just meant with MMA being a big thing these days, more schools are encouraging friendly competition and full contact. Which again is a GOOD thing.
    I was not referring to your post at all. I have no problem with free sparring, and what's more, there is not necessarily anything inauthentic or nontraditional about free sparring.

    What I'm talking about is a shady practice I've noticed at clubs in my area. 'Jujutsu' is a very flexible term, and the popularity of MMA and BJJ is leading some clubs to use that flexibility to exploit the uninformed.

    For example, this club near me:
    http://www.americandojo.com/martialArts.asp
    The guy who runs this club is a TKD guy, but he wants to look like an MMA instructor, so he teaches grappling, too. He claims to have studied under Carlson Gracie, but he has no actual BJJ credentials, so it would be fraudulent to say that he teaches BJJ. Instead, he assembles a mishmash of what judo and BJJ he knows, calls it 'jujutsu' (no one can stop him from using that name), and teaches it. This is the kind of jujutsu I'm trying to warn OP about.
    Last edited by OwlMatt; 5/17/2013 2:37pm at .
  6. It is Fake is offline
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    Posted On:
    5/17/2013 3:16pm

    staff
     Style: xingyi

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Southpaw86 View Post
    Never said anything about instructors teaching BJJ that were not qualified, never said anything about BJJ being taught period, don't try to read whats not there.
    He didn't, you did.


    Can anyone tell me, out of Seidokaikan, Kyokushin, Goju-ryu and Japanese Jujitsu -

    Quote Originally Posted by OwlMatt View Post
    I don't know much about Seidokai.

    Kyokushin is a style with a heavy emphasis on full-contact sparring. Not really my cup of tea, but a good way to go if you're looking for real fighting. Sparring is also probably the best cardio workout in stand-up martial arts; I used to do TKD and two minutes of sparring will gas you more than half an hour on a bike.

    Goju, as it was originally developed, is a hard/soft style with an emphasis on kata, one-step drills, and strength conditioning. Nowadays a school that calls itself Goju could be anything, so check the place out thoroughly.

    Jujutsu is another thing that could be anything. Literally, jujutsu is the traditional Japanese grappling from which judo, aikido, BJJ, etc. evolved; it generally is done mostly from standing and contains more striking (and sometimes weapons) than any of its descendants. But these days, the word can mean many different things. Lately I've been noticing that a lot of guys who want to sound like BJJ instructors but lack the credentials are saying that they teach jujitsu. Like the above, check it out.
    "Like the above, check it out" meant all of the other responses not you.
    Yes, that period is very important.



    He answered the OP without quoting you. Take a deep breath and relax.
    Last edited by It is Fake; 5/17/2013 3:26pm at .
  7. Southpaw86 is offline

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    Posted On:
    5/17/2013 3:24pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by OwlMatt View Post
    I was not referring to your post at all. I have no problem with free sparring, and what's more, there is not necessarily anything inauthentic or nontraditional about free sparring.

    What I'm talking about is a shady practice I've noticed at clubs in my area. 'Jujutsu' is a very flexible term, and the popularity of MMA and BJJ is leading some clubs to use that flexibility to exploit the uninformed.

    For example, this club near me:
    http://www.americandojo.com/martialArts.asp
    The guy who runs this club is a TKD guy, but he wants to look like an MMA instructor, so he teaches grappling, too. He claims to have studied under Carlson Gracie, but he has no actual BJJ credentials, so it would be fraudulent to say that he teaches BJJ. Instead, he assembles a mishmash of what judo and BJJ he knows, calls it 'jujutsu' (no one can stop him from using that name), and teaches it. This is the kind of jujutsu I'm trying to warn OP about.
    I apologize, I was assuming because you said "like the above". Though you are right, there are many martial arts places who try to claim they "trained" with a Gracie. A lot of people live through other peoples success, good way to cheat your own progress in life.
  8. OwlMatt is offline

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    Posted On:
    5/17/2013 4:06pm


     Style: aikido

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    My apologies for any confusion. "Like the above" meant the above paragraph (which also ended in a warning to check the place out), not the previous post.
    Last edited by OwlMatt; 5/17/2013 4:13pm at .
  9. gojusamurai is offline

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    Posted On:
    5/25/2013 12:32pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Okinawan Goju Ryu , Judo

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    ive taken Japanese Jujutsu, great art, throws jointlocks, strikes, groundwork and more. Like someone else said, pretty complete.

    I take goju now and judo. Goju is really cool. Its an inside style of fighting which is what i need. Lots of conditioning, and internal power development It has a lot of chinese influence which is really cool. If you have a good instructor which i feel I do, it could be very rewarding.

    good luck
  10. ccamara is offline

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    Posted On:
    5/28/2013 9:21am


     Style: Goju Ryu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    As the name says, Goju is a system with a good balance between hard and soft. From all the arts that you mention, I would say that a proper trained Goju really shows itīs chines origins.

    Kata will be the base of all your Goju training, but Kata with real fighting in mind, through bunkai training and a controlled anything goes sparring. But you can also find Goju schools that are devoted to competition Kumite and look nothing like Goju.

    Kyokushin is a great style, but I would dare to say it being a hard style is not suitable for any ages. In the case of the JJ...it really depends if itīs very traditional or focused on competition.
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