218358 Bullies, 7828 online  
  • Register
Our Sponsors:

Results 1 to 10 of 10
Sponsored Links Spacer Image
  1. marcwagz is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    199

    Posted On:
    10/11/2012 10:29pm


     Style: Goju Ryu Karate

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Goju Sparring

    That develop quickly! I'm still only a yellow belt in Goju Ryu but I have begun sparring more in class now. Our sparring is pretty good for what I have seen in karate classes, no point fighting, we put on headgear, mouthguards, boxing gloves, and shin and instep pads then spar with basically what amounts to kickboxing rules (some of the higher belts spar with muay thai rules, or muay thai + takedowns/sweeps), so basically most of us just kick and punch.

    I've noticed a couple things, a spinning backfist seems like a very useless maneuver. I think because I'm a yellow belt the brown belt I was sparring yesterday thought it would be good to practice spinning backfist on me, but it really is a telegraphed move, and its really easy to just jab or cross the guy swinging at you in the back of the head. What was Sonnen thinking...

    Superman punch seems cool though, I tried it out after I had pretty much extinguished my Goju arsenal (I probably did it wrong I copied it straight out of UFC) but it landed once and I actually didn't get countered which was a change. This seems like a bad habit though, copying moves off of TV, so I'll do it less, it is fun to try out though.

    Questions of Note:
    Higher belts seem to check or deflect leg kicks instinctively even if I set them up with jabs. Am I maybe doing something wrong like looking at feet or is that to be expected? And if so how do you ever get use out of leg kick?


    Last question though is putting power into your strikes, we spar hard enough to feel the oomph, I got the wind knocked out of me by a jab and had my jaw knocked hard. But I find I just throw arm punches when I am sparring, bad form? I am consciously trying to lower power, but I assume I should stress form over speed in shots. agree disagree
  2. gregaquaman is online now
    gregaquaman's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Arlie Beach
    Posts
    2,400

    Posted On:
    10/11/2012 10:45pm


     Style: mma /boxing/muai thai

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Stick to basics. Pretty much dont spin unless you are awsome. Throw the leg kick after the right hand. Or thow the leg kick under the check into the inside of the other leg.

    If you are being punched in the head feel free to punch them in the head back. arm punching is again if you are awsome.

    Fast crisp shots with some juice behind them. Dont try to push the other guy over just let them connect and get it back to your head.
    Whitsunday Martial Arts Airlie Beach North Queensland.
    http://www.facebook.com/#!/WhitsundayMartialArts
  3. Fuzzy is offline
    Fuzzy's Avatar

    Welterweight

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    London
    Posts
    958

    Posted On:
    10/12/2012 5:03am

    supporting member
     Style: DocePares/MMA(YawYan)

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Don't do the spinning backfist unless you've drilled the **** out of it and you've got the timing down.

    Personally its kinda my Sunday punch and I've had great success with it.

    The answer to your last question is time, just keep sparring and eventually your brain will go: "OK, I'm actually going to hit this dude hard now"

    Also, since you're doing Goju, are you focussing on circling, angles and leg kicks?
  4. marcwagz is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    199

    Posted On:
    10/12/2012 8:36am


     Style: Goju Ryu Karate

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Fuzzy View Post
    Don't do the spinning backfist unless you've drilled the **** out of it and you've got the timing down.

    Personally its kinda my Sunday punch and I've had great success with it.

    The answer to your last question is time, just keep sparring and eventually your brain will go: "OK, I'm actually going to hit this dude hard now"

    Also, since you're doing Goju, are you focusing on circling, angles and leg kicks?
    indeed I am trying. It is hard to angle somebody more experienced in goju than you though all the belts I sparred (all higher than me) simply followed my movement even if I took a fast angle cut. Only thing I've done a couple times that works to cut angles is step off on an angle step and then right away throw a roundhouse to the midde, they end up walking right into my roundhouse. Works the first couple times on most people, but then it gets caught after that most of the time.

    As for leg kicks I'm trying but as I've posted, everyone seems incredibly apt to deflecting or checking leg kicks.
  5. daishi is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    671

    Posted On:
    10/12/2012 9:06am


     Style: Aikido/JJJ/Judo/GoJu Ryu

    2
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Hey welcome to GoJu!

    About trying those 'odd' strikes from tv. If your teacher is fine with it, I think its kind of a good idea to do in practice. It gives you and your partners an opportunity to get exposure to these kind of non-traditional attacks...particular if you are thinking from a self-defense point of view; if you were compelled to try a superman from watching it on tv, certainly some punk in 'the street' would do the same. At the same time, I would check with your teacher as attacks like that may be frowned upon in formal events like GoJu only tournaments (vice MMA, or open tournaments) or formal testing events.

    Leg kicks are easy to block with a leg check. Its just a natural reaction. If you aren't doing full contact sparring, I am not sure that throwing a leg kick, for its own merit, would be very valuable. Certainly it is a good feint or distraction tool, but if you aren't powering through a leg check (block)...ie making it hurt to block it, I don't see the value (but I'm no expert). When I spar, I use leg kicks to get my opponent on one foot (when he blocks with his leg), or as feint to get them distracted.

    Its good you aren't focusing on point sparring too much. If you are a point sparring competitor then great, its a highly competitive field and you need to constantly train in the minutiae to be relevant (we have two people who train a lot for point sparring, one of which is on the US Karate Team and regularly medals in international competition). The vast majority of students don't practice point sparring (we call it dojo vs tournament sparring). Anyway... In GoJu, power is generated through proper technique. A lot of schools that focus on point-sparring let power slip away in favor of speed and long-range, weak contact. Two big issues I've noticed in karate people I've interacted with; lack of power when sparing or doing striking drills, and injury to wrists and feet when striking heavy bags because they don't practice striking something with more resistance than the air or a weak-ass, light weight (ie the more affordable one) wave master. I cringe when I see kids fist scrunch into their forearm when punching something with resistance. So with practice of good technique you will achieve power. A lot of that comes from pushing off the ground with your rear leg and engaging your hips. Even boxers use their legs and core in power punches. Good training to you!
  6. Permalost is online now
    Permalost's Avatar

    pro nonsense self defense

    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    12,365

    Posted On:
    10/12/2012 11:54am

    supporting member
     Style: FMA, dumbek, Indian clubs

    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by marcwagz View Post
    a spinning backfist seems like a very useless maneuver. I think because I'm a yellow belt the brown belt I was sparring yesterday thought it would be good to practice spinning backfist on me, but it really is a telegraphed move, and its really easy to just jab or cross the guy swinging at you in the back of the head. What was Sonnen thinking...
    Well its not something to throw out there to start with. A guy I trained with was showing me how he learned it in Hawaii, and he would step forward and across his centerline to evade a roundhouse kick, and step through into the spinning backfist. This gives it power and delivers it in a way that moves on an angle, rather than spinning in place or trying to step in a straight line to throw it. I've seen it taught as counters to other things too. The general rule I learned was to not spin unless you are spun. Meaning you miss a roundhouse kick, or over-rotate into something you thought you were gonna hit but then missed. Or your straight kick is parried to the outside (this was our preferred way of dealing with straight kicks). Why not get in the habit of spinning backfist in these instances? If they're closing in on you its likely to catch them by surprise, and if they're not then it misses and no big deal because you're out of range.

    It isn't "really easy to just jab or cross the guy swinging at you in the back of the head", unless they're using it foolishly. Its logical to think so, like its logical to think that you could do the same thing to someone spinning after a Thai roundhouse, but in reality its a narrow window and they shouldn't be doing it when you're primed and ready to jab/cross. Also, punching the back of the head is dangerous.

    Superman punch seems cool though, I tried it out after I had pretty much extinguished my Goju arsenal (I probably did it wrong I copied it straight out of UFC) but it landed once and I actually didn't get countered which was a change. This seems like a bad habit though, copying moves off of TV, so I'll do it less, it is fun to try out though.
    If by "copied it straight out of UFC" you mean that you did it just like the pro fighter(s) you were watching, you're probably mistaken. I say this because I've never seen anyone do a technically correct superman punch without practicing it, but I've seen several attempts. Also because you're watching a pro fighter do something he's probably practiced many many times on the bag etc. So, I hope the "I probably did it wrong I copied it straight out of UFC" isn't to imply that it was wrong because the way the UFC fighters do it is wrong, but rather it was wrong because you were trying to learn it off the TV.

    The key to this one, like the first one, is not to try to swoop straight in with an unorthodox haymaker. You aren't trying to make them in awe of your awesome superman jump above their head- you're trying to move horizontally for the most part. You should do this after throwing several kicks to elicit a default reaction that'll open up the head. A lot of people do this with a leg kick but I prefer to use a front kick because the hip is at a better position to quickly reverse to throw the leg back, which tips the torso into position.


    Higher belts seem to check or deflect leg kicks instinctively even if I set them up with jabs. Am I maybe doing something wrong like looking at feet or is that to be expected? And if so how do you ever get use out of leg kick?
    Well, maybe you need to be setting them up with jabs and other kicks. Round kicks specifically. If your round kicks are always to the legs, even if they're coming after jabs, they'll know they can just pick up the leg and check, but if it sometimes goes up to the ribs or head, it makes it more difficult for them.

    Another perspective- if you always know that your opponent is going to pick up their close leg and check, consider how you would attack someone standing on one foot. If their leg is always going up, try kicking deeper and going for the standing leg .


    Last question though is putting power into your strikes, we spar hard enough to feel the oomph, I got the wind knocked out of me by a jab and had my jaw knocked hard. But I find I just throw arm punches when I am sparring, bad form? I am consciously trying to lower power, but I assume I should stress form over speed in shots. agree disagree
    Agree- you can take down the power while using good form. Otherwise why bother?
  7. marcwagz is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    199

    Posted On:
    11/29/2012 2:10pm


     Style: Goju Ryu Karate

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    we had a grading today where I upgraded my pants holder to the color of one of my favorite juicy fruits.

    We did lots of fitness stuff, running, blocking, punching, kicking, katas and finished once everyone was dead tired with a bunch of sparring, maybe 5 2 minute rounds. So not much by muay thai standards but I was tired and after 2 rounds of sparring I was super di duper gassed and just tried to not get the crap kicked out of me by one of the most experienced black belts in our school.

    In relation to this thread I did not throw any spinning backfists, superman punch is still working for me but it takes a lot of energy to fake a kick and then throw a punch. I used some unorthodox goju strikes though like the knocking backfists which I was able to get use out of.

    Still having problems with punching power, throwing hard but not too hard, getting more used to it though.
  8. KickPuncher is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    NY, NY
    Posts
    157

    Posted On:
    11/29/2012 4:49pm


     Style: Muay Thai, BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Not to get too focused on the spinning backfist, but there are other ways to sneak it in, as by itself you'll see it coming a mile away. This is all based on MT training but I'm sure it can also apply to Goju.

    1) Throw a couple leg kicks, then on your 2nd/3rd/4th/whatever, fake the leg kick and step across your body to execute the SBF.

    2) If someone catches your kick to the body, you can turn out of it (provided they don't have a super-tight grip) and throw a SBF. For example, if your right leg is caught, turn to your left, pointing your right knee to the floor (your back will be turning towards your oppt) and transition into a left SBF.

    Not the highest percentage move out there, but it has worked from time to time, but only (for me at least) when incorporated into a fake or an escape.
  9. SpamN'Cheese is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    The Land Of Processed Meat And Internet Trolls
    Posts
    262

    Posted On:
    12/06/2012 10:40am


     Style: Karate, Boxing, BJJ noob

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Sounds awesome! My old Goju dojo used to do irikumi go and point sparring, but eventually did mostly kata with point sparring being done less than once a month. I actually got kicked out before my ikkyu test because of training disagreements and for posting on Bullshido, lol. But enough of my life story, back to your questions. 1. Just keep sparring and training. You'll eventually understand what you're doing wrong. That, and an instructor will help you. 2. You know the basic seiken zuki? How you use your hips to get power to the punch? Same principle. If you throw a hook, turn your hips in the direction of the hook. Like in Happy Gilmore, "it's all in the hips".
  10. Budo_Brown is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Portland, Oregon- United States
    Posts
    166

    Posted On:
    12/18/2012 1:10pm


     Style: Kyokushin Karate

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I am also new to karate (kyokushin). We spar three times a week sometimes more. We were allowed full contact sparring from your first night though. Being that I am not only new to karate but new to combat sports in general I work basics basics basics. Fundamentals. We have to crawl before we walk, walk before we run, and run before we sprint. I suggest you get down all the basic punch and kick techniques before you start mixing in things seen on TV. If you really want to spin, drill your spinning back kick. It's very effective and can be short or long range depending on how you set it up. Other than that, just work hard and spar with upper belts. You only get better by working with better people.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Powered by vBulletin™© contact@vbulletin.com vBulletin Solutions, Inc. 2011 All rights reserved.