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  1. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by NeilG View Post
    Judo and kendo are also gendai budo. The term just means modern martial arts.
    Any Japanese martial art founded after the Meiji Restoration (~1869) is technically gendai budo. It's in contrast to koryu (ancient martial arts). Virtually no JJJ you'll see in the US is koryu. So, yes, technically, Judo is gendai budo (by about a dozen years). My description of the characteristics of most gendai budo is accurate, however.

  2. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by Res Judicata View Post
    My description of the characteristics of most gendai budo is accurate, however.
    Most?

  3. #43

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    The subject of lineage is an interesting one because it seems to be very important in non-competitive systems. Is this because they do not test their skills against students from other clubs?
    Last edited by Nickosaurus; 11/09/2012 9:40am at . Reason: Grammer

  4. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nickosaurus View Post
    The subject of lineage is an interesting one because it seems to be very important in non-competitive systems. Is this because they do not test their skills against students from other clubs?
    The subject of lineage is very important in many competitive systems, too. Have you never seen how often BJJ guys get their panties in a bunch over lineage, affiliations, gradings, etc?

  5. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nickosaurus View Post
    The subject of lineage is an interesting one because it seems to be very important in non-competitive systems. Is this because they do not test their skills against students from other clubs?
    I think this may be the case some times, but its usually obvious when theyre trying to prove something (you know, 'my club is the ultimate because I am the descendant of Musashi and Chuck Norris'). However some times I think it's more a way of suggesting that what people are learning is more 'traditional'- remember not all martial arts are to fight or compete, some are to continue an ancient tradition and art, so knowledge of the lineage may actually be interesting in those contexts perhaps?

  6. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nickosaurus View Post
    The subject of lineage is an interesting one because it seems to be very important in non-competitive systems. Is this because they do not test their skills against students from other clubs?
    I think this may be the case some times, but its usually obvious when theyre trying to prove something (you know, 'my club is the ultimate because I am the descendant of Musashi and Chuck Norris'). However some times I think it's more a way of suggesting that what people are learning is more 'traditional'- remember not all martial arts are to fight or compete, some are to continue an ancient tradition and art, so knowledge of the lineage may actually be interesting in those contexts perhaps?

  7. #47

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    Quote Originally Posted by tmorterlaing View Post
    I think this may be the case some times, but its usually obvious when theyre trying to prove something (you know, 'my club is the ultimate because I am the descendant of Musashi and Chuck Norris'). However some times I think it's more a way of suggesting that what people are learning is more 'traditional'- remember not all martial arts are to fight or compete, some are to continue an ancient tradition and art, so knowledge of the lineage may actually be interesting in those contexts perhaps?
    Like the difference between budo / martial arts and kakutogi / fighting arts.

    I used to train at a Kung-Fu school. What drew me to them was their Sanshou (Sanda) program. They also had a kickboxing program. But it turned out that their big ticket item (the program with the most members) was their Northern Praying Mantis Kung-Fu program. That's where you could really see the difference between martial art and fighting art. The Kung-Fu program was more about preserving and promoting the traditional art whereas the the Sanshou and kickboxing programs were more about combats sports and practical application of fighting techniques.

  8. #48

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    Quote Originally Posted by Keej613 View Post
    Most?
    Judo is technically gendai budo, but it's nothing like most "JJJ." I should mention that there are also various JJJ styles that are essentially Judo that has been modified in an attempt to make it more self-defense oriented.

  9. #49

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nickosaurus View Post
    The subject of lineage is an interesting one because it seems to be very important in non-competitive systems. Is this because they do not test their skills against students from other clubs?
    Yes I have indeed, I guess associations are important to everyone its validation for the art and a feeling of belonging for the student

  10. #50

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    Quote Originally Posted by tmorterlaing View Post
    I think it's more a way of suggesting that what people are learning is more 'traditional'- remember not all martial arts are to fight or compete, some are to continue an ancient tradition and art, so knowledge of the lineage may actually be interesting in those contexts perhaps?
    You're right of course and there are lots of people who are interested and as long as they know it won't give them the same skills as 'alive' training then it can be a fun way to keep fit.


    that is why its shameful to find people charging (often quite large) fees to learn something which is neither effective or traditional.

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