Page 1 of 2 12 Last
  1. #1
    Fuzzy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    London
    Posts
    1,185
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Kamagong or Bahi?

    Hi guys.

    So the senior students at my club are encouraging me to pick up a heavier stick for twirling and exercise.

    I'm looking around and I see both Kamagong and Bahi sticks in very similar (surprisingly expensive) price ranges.

    Is there anything to recommend one over the other? Are there any other woods I should be looking at?

    Its unlikely that I'll be using the stick for much impact work, since I know hardwoods can be quite brittle and I don't really want to waste a 30 stick beating a tyre.

  2. #2
    jspeedy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Orlando, FL
    Posts
    1,709
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I know first hand kamagong is good for solo drills to add weight. I haven't trained with bahi but I have picked up a pair and I remember them being heavier than rattan but I think they were lighter than kamagong. Could have just been a light pair of bahi sticks though. In you're case if goo with kamagong if you're not going to be striking with them. You always have the option off buying thick ass rattan sticks.

  3. #3
    Chili Pepper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    2,390
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I bought a pair of kamagong and bahi at the same time, and they felt pretty much comparable in weight.

    I've been told that bahi is less prone to fracture though, so that alone is a big selling point - at the last seminar I attended, two kamagong sticks were broken over one of those Bob standing dummies.

  4. #4
    Fuzzy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    London
    Posts
    1,185
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Thanks guys. The shop I usually buy from is out of Kamagong, so Bahi its going to be.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    275
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Bahi is much more durable. Similar in weight too. Kamagong is very brittle, and even though it has a good feel, will break if you hit it against a similar heavy stick repeatedly. Bahi holds up much better.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Tulsa, Oklahoma
    Posts
    73
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Bahi all the way. I have seen bahi break only once n 17 years, my teacher actually cracked the foundation of my house with one and split the stick. The difference is bahi is fiberous like rattan, both plants are members of the palm family. SO when they do break there are no sharp edges.
    There are sometimes micro voids in the stick that will make them flex upon contact and shred. For banging, there is no substitute for rattan, not because its better than bahi, but like you said who wants to tear up a $30 stick.

  7. #7
    Mr. Machette's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    3,237
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    If it's just weight you're looking for why restrict yourself to wood?

    The local hardware store will have various lengths and diameters of metal pipe for a fraction of what your wood sticks will cost. (Though you may want to get some tape as well to improve the grip)

    Can't bang with them at practice but they'll give you the workout you're looking for.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Tulsa, Oklahoma
    Posts
    73
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Here's a tip for stregnth and grip training. I have several pairs of steel rods and pipes, varying weights and diameters. Get something thin and heavy, where you really have to hold on tight and swing away. Twirling with thin heavy sticks will make you much better with lighter fatter sticks.

  9. #9
    jspeedy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Orlando, FL
    Posts
    1,709
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I'm wary off metal pipes because of the potential for injury. I suppose if you take it slow you re probably fine but of you get you intense you might be vulnerable to a shoulder or arm injury.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Tulsa, Oklahoma
    Posts
    73
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    well said, you have to balance intensitiy with the weight of the stick. I still have a recurring wrist injury from swinging an abaniko too hard with kamagong.

Page 1 of 2 12 Last

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Log in

Log in
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO