1. #1

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    Working out, some questions?

    I've asked in forum's dedicated to fitness and didn't get proper answers, just "it's all relative to yourself" (which I realise, but doesn't help me set targets) And I realise this could also go in the physical training forum but it seems a bit of a nooby thing.

    I can now tricep press 40-50KG for 10 repetitions. What is a good target for 2 months time?

    I haven't been doing any bench press stuff, but when I tried it, I could bench 40KG 10 times, what's a good target for 2 months time?

    I'm just aiming to gain strength, for boxing as I figure if I go into a fight with someone on the same level of skill as me, me being a heck of a lot stronger than them can only be a good thing.

  2. #2
    ChenPengFi's Avatar
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    Welcome, how old are you?
    Do you have a coach?

  3. #3

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    Why not squat or clean and jerk for harder punches?

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lindz View Post
    Why not squat or clean and jerk for harder punches?
    ^^This. Legs and core are important too. Also, if it's punching specific muscles you're after, start doing extra rounds on the heavybag.


    And as for your actual question: it's all relative to yourself.
    You know your own body, set your own goals.

  5. #5
    patfromlogan's Avatar
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    I'd say in addition to benches do dumbell inclined and such AND light weight lots of reps flies for shoulder joints - front, side, bent arm, there maybe more... More than one person has fucked up their shoulders doing benches and push-ups. A lifter dislocated his shoulder doing benches and a ma hear fucked up his rotators in both shoulders doing excessive push-ups; hands together, hands in front - said he felt so good he did another entire set. Next day got ready to do his morning reps and fell on his face.
    Last edited by patfromlogan; 9/12/2012 6:58pm at .
    "Preparing mentally, the most important thing is, if you aren't doing it for the love of it, then don't do it." - Benny Urquidez

  6. #6
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    As for setting targets, unfortunately the people who already told you that it's all relative to yourself are correct. But that doesn't mean you can't still set some targets. Because of variations among individuals in factors like bone length, tendon insertion, muscle fiber ratios, cross sectional area, neurological efficiency, natural ability, genetics, etc; it is simply impossible to accurately compare individuals based on the amount of weight they lift.

    As a very simple example: Guy A is a very short guy, Guy B is a very tall guy. They go to the gym together and do squats. A squats 400 lbs but because he's short, the bar only travels 1.5 feet. B squats 200 lbs but because he's tall, the bar traveled 3 feet. Who went harder? Depends on how you define it. Sure, Guy A lifted twice as much weight but it only went half as far. In physics terms, they both did exactly the same amount of work, despite using drastically different poundages.

    When you're creating lifting goals for yourself, the only person you can reliably compare yourself to is you. It's not a "Me vs. Them" mentality, but rather a "Past vs. Future" mentality. If you're stronger than you were yesterday, you're at least heading in the right direction. As for what kinds of numbers and percentages you should be targeting, a relatively simple Google search should provide you with ample information (especially if you know your body type). But also bear in mind that different experts have different opinions on these matters, and nothing is carved in stone.

    Finally, newbie questions are welcome in the PT Forum. As long as they are relevant to the subject of physical training, you're welcome to ask, post, and discuss whatever you like.
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  7. #7
    ChenPengFi's Avatar
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    Would it not also be safe to say that in physics terms, a longer femur would make for more work, during a squat?

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    How long have you boxed?

    I don't mean to be rude or anything, but the only pure weight exercise I've ever felt to be conducive to punching power is actually squats. Then, core exercises like dragon flags and twists, and shoulder endurance exercises like push ups and chins, should normally do the rest provided that you spar and work the bags like you should.

    As for your targets, they are subjective and don't translate so well to boxing skill. But, in order to answer your question:

    1. I don't think triceps press is anything to boast about at all because it's a bit of a "disco exercise" as we say in my country. Do dips instead, or close-grip bench press, if you want to work your triceps. As for dips, I guess anything above 20 reps or so should be ok for a normal-sized guy, though you will improve very quickly as you work on your technique.

    2. I would say that anyone of the age 16-50 has rather mediocre strength if he cannot do 1RM his own body weight in bench press. I would say that he is pretty strong if he can do his weight times 1.5. Anything in between, in my view, should be seen as "average". Just to give a feel for it, if you max out on 100 kg, you should probably do 10 reps on maybe 70 kg or so. But it differs between individuals and it will all improve with proper training. And again, all of this has very little to do with boxing.

  9. #9
    TaeBo_Master's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChenPengFi View Post
    I always enjoy a TBM appearance.
    Would it not also be safe to say that in physics terms, a longer femur would make for more work, during a squat?
    Broadly speaking, yes. "Work" is fairly simple to calculate. It is simple the amount of force (in this case, the mass of the bar times its acceleration, and adding in the acceleration due to gravity. By the way, pounds are technically a measurement of force, not mass) multiplied by the distance traveled. Ironically though, for most weight lifting exercises, the Work will almost always work out to 0 if you measure the entire movement. That's because the weight usually ends in the same place that it started, so the total displacement was 0. So to simplify, just measure the concentric portion of the lift to give you a basic measure. It is possible to include the eccentric portion as well, but the calculations are more complex because you are fighting against gravity.

    Your speculation about a longer femur is generally accurate. There will be a direct relationship if the other major levers (torso and tibia) in the lift maintain the same ratio with the femur. But you can also have 2 people of the same height who end up encountering different forces during the lift. The difference is due to the different ratios of lengths of the levers. I won't do all the math (I'm not entirely sure I could if I wanted to), but a basic breakdown is as follows:

    Someone who has a torso/femur ratio in which the femur is relatively short and the torso relatively long will tend to squat deep more easily. The short femur and long torso tends to allow the torso to remain closer to upright, freeing up the deep movement. Ironically though, although the distance is longer the force applied against the muscles (and particularly the lower back) is less. The more upright posture ends up keeping the lever shorter in the horizontal plane.

    Someone the opposite, with a relatively long femur and relatively short torso will do the opposite. They will tend to have more difficulty getting deep (assuming an identical foot position as the other person), and the torso will tend to have a greater forward lean. This usually results in a shorter bar path (in the vertical direction anyway, it's more complicated than that but that's another day) but greater force, in the form of leverage, applied against the muscles and joints, particularly the lower back.

    However, a little geometry also shows that you can alter your effective femur length by changing your foot position. Making your stance wider and pointing the toes out more will have the effect of shortening your femur. Bringing the feet closer together and straighter will have the effect of lengthening your femur.
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