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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Sep 2012
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    Bothell, WA, USA
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    10
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    Taekwondo
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Eric-The-Red View Post
    Forgive me for not getting the joke. I am a lowly noob, after all. Why is this hilarious?
    hmm... apparently I can't edit my own posts? Stupidity gets no take-backs, I guess. Once it's on the interwebs, there is no going back.

    I get the joke now and yes... it is hilarious.

    @ joanlynch21 - shouldn't I be saying your line back to you?

    ** Also please pardon the numerous posts from me. I didn't see the "+ button before responding to each quote. If I had, I would have put everything in one post. **

  2. #12
    lionknight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Wa
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    1,193
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    Much striking, SAMBO, BJJ
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Eric-The-Red View Post
    I'm sorry that you assume that a TKD school is, by default, a mcdojo. There is a difference between mcdojos and incomplete arts.
    So what makes your place "not a mcdojo"?

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Bothell, WA, USA
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    10
    Style
    Taekwondo
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by lionknight View Post
    So what makes your place "not a mcdojo"?
    This sounds like bait. ;)

    I think before we get too far into that discussion, we would need to both settle on a definition of "mcdojo". Having mostly studied traditional MA, my opinions of what makes a "mcdojo" are, perhaps, different from that of a MMA/BJJ practitioner. That being said, I will try to answer your question to the best of my abilities, and hopefully not make a fool of myself.

    1) Knowledge/understanding that traditional and mainstream TKD is a martial art and not a complete self defense system. Some would argue that "martial" should be taken out of TKD's description altogether. I would contend that mainstream TKD is a sport (*flinches from whirlwind of incoming axe kicks*) and that traditional TKD still deserves to have "martial" as part of it's description, though still incomplete as a self defense system. This leads into...

    2) Reliance on a single technique or limited set of techniques (only kicking and punching, or only grappling), while effective to the extent of the persons training, sets one up to be woefully unprepared for the unpredictable. If all you know is kicking and punching, how will you defend yourself against some who tackles you from behind? (undesirable no matter what you practice) If all you know is grappling, how will you react to a boxer or someone who can kick like a mule? These are rhetorical questions because the "what if... then I..." scenarios are endless and tiresome and I haven't even brought knife-wielding attacker in yet. I am not saying that a grappler will never beat a boxer or anything like that, just that relying on only one skill set can be dangerous, not only in your lack of skill-set but in mindset as well.

    3) In sparring, present more realistic tactics. Only a few of these, for example, would be: when at distance (not grappling) keep your hands up like a boxer; guard your face and your body; don't let your arms dangle like wet noodles; focus on footwork but don't jump around like you have to go to the potty (*ducks from incoming kicks again*); kicks to the face/head should be the rarity; any kick above the belt is asking to be caught and even some to the belt are in dangerous territory; if you get closer than kicking range, utilize punches and upright grappling; take them to the ground if you need to. These are just a few of the many sparring elements that can help a school be less of a "mcdojo"

    Many of you will say "but that is MMA that you are talking about, not TKD." And, to a certain extent you would be correct. Which brings me to my last couple of points:

    4) My school is, at it's core, based off of ITF TKD. We practice ITF forms (or whatever you feel like calling them). We teach the tenets of TKD. We have a belt system. We occasionally break inanimate objects that can't hit back (though they do hurt when they don't break :P). It is not just about the fight, it is also about the philosophy (the character development, if you will).

    and finally my last and maybe least important point, though it speaks to one of the biggest earmarks of a mcdojo:

    5) Belt promotion timeline. There is none. Sure I could give you an educated estimate as to how long it takes to get a BB, but there is no guarantee that you will get it in that timeline. We have 10 color belts before black. If you work hard you may get it in 4-5 years. A very few have made it in 3 and I was not one of those. I am average and got mine in four. Approximately 2 for 2nd Dan, 3 for 3rd, etc. I practiced for 10 years, took a 10 year break (another story for another time) and have been back at it for a year. I am finally testing for my 3rd Dan. If I had stuck with it, it would have taken me, an average joe, 11 years to reach my 3rd Dan.

    lionknight - Thank you for asking such a difficult question. It actually made me sit and think carefully about what I believe, practice, and teach. I hope that I answered your question to your satisfaction. :)

    p.s. We have no one in our organization who goes by "Grandmaster [so-and-so]" or anything like that. They could, according to their belt rank, but they don't. The instructors are on a first-name basis with each other and the students call them "Mr. [last name]" or "master [first name]" as a sign of courtesy and to show respect. I intend to keep it that way, but honestly I blush every time a student refers to me as "master"... it's just weird.
    Last edited by Eric-The-Red; 9/13/2012 2:49pm at . Reason: i'm a space-case

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