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  1. Ragar is offline

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    Posted On:
    9/01/2012 7:59pm


     Style: Tai Chi

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Han Style Yiquan Workshops-Hawaii

    Han Jing Chen will be in Hawaii conducting a number of Yiquan workshops.

    The public workshops for Honolulu will be:

    Saturday & Sunday, September 22 & 23, 9 am - 3pm
    Leeward Community College (dance studio in the LCC theater)
    $120 each session

    Classes on the Big Island of Hawaii will be earlier in September. If anyone is interested, let me know. I will have to check on the exact schedule.

    Some video of class he taught in Wuxi, China





    While he does only speak Chinese, there will be a translator familiar with martial arts principles and his art present
  2. Ragar is offline

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    Posted On:
    9/01/2012 9:07pm


     Style: Tai Chi

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    In the context of a lot of the postings on Bullshido, I think this is someone people would be interested in. Especially if you subscribe to Wang Xiangzhai's philosophy that Tai Chi/martial arts was great until people started to add all sorts of extra motions and techniques.

    I have been studying with his students for about 2 years now. Had a seminar with Master Han and one with his colleague, Dr. Edward Lee, both in Hawaii. Just trained with Master Han this summer in Zhuhai.

    He is very much about paring the excess away. There are no forms, but some set exercises of simple movement to help train you to get rid of habits like tai chi weight shifting. He feels that the whole idea of power coming up through the legs transferred through the waist and out the hands is inefficient and telegraphs your intent.

    Your goal is to unify the body into action using your natural ability. A lot of martial arts say that, but in his view they add too much extra through intellectualizing the process. A tiger doesn't do tiger style, they act according to their nature and ability. So too should humans use their natural abilities rather than creating artificial structures.

    Basically you're looking to progress toward a natural and unified use of your physical abilities. Every move is a new move and you listen to what your body is telling you about your mechanics and tension points.

    If you idealize a movement you did in the past, you are failing. This can be a tough thing to avoid. Alot yiquan practitioners can tend to get a little too focused on concrete visualizations as part of Zhan zhuang practice. This can cause your practice to stagnate. Every movement is new with no assumptions about what will happen.

    One thing he said that really appealed to me was that the fist is the least important part of fighting. First you need the courage to engage with your enemy, then you need the ability to close the distance between you and last you need the fist.

    I know very little of what I said is groundbreaking in respect to martial arts. What I really enjoy about him is that he is "traditional practitioner" who subscribes to many of the no B.S. philosophies discussed here on the forums.

    If nothing else, his philosophy is interesting to listen to and gets you thinking.

    I know most people here don't live in Hawaii. He just finished two sessions in California-Sacramento and San Francisco. I wasn't paying attention to his schedule closely enough or I would have given some advanced notice for those who might be interested. I suspect he may be back in the U.S. within the year so I will try to do provide more notice next time.
  3. JimDesu is offline

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    Posted On:
    9/06/2012 3:54pm

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    You won't find much yiquan interest on this board (I suspect do to the lack of US'ian practitioners). Seems like a real class act compared to the guy I learned from; if I spent less time limping, I'd be highly inclined to check him out. As it is, I'm happy at least to have the vids -- thanks for posting them. :)
  4. vaquero de las nalgas is offline
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    Posted On:
    9/11/2012 3:57pm


     Style: Hsing I, Bagua, Chi kung

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Does he have a website? I'd love to attend a seminar closer to me than Hawaii.
  5. patfromlogan is offline
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    Posted On:
    9/12/2012 2:23am

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     Style: Kyokushinkai / Kajukenbo

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Aloha! I'm on the Big Island - I'll forward this to my wife; she's a sr student yang style under Kayo and Ben Lo.
    "Preparing mentally, the most important thing is, if you aren't doing it for the love of it, then don't do it." - Benny Urquidez
  6. Eddie Hardon is offline

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    Posted On:
    9/12/2012 4:44am

    Join us... or die
     Style: Trad Ju Jitsu

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ragar View Post

    Your goal is to unify the body into action using your natural ability.

    Basically you're looking to progress toward a natural and unified use of your physical abilities. Every move is a new move and you listen to what your body is telling you about your mechanics and tension points.

    If you idealize a movement you did in the past, you are failing. This can be a tough thing to avoid. Alot yiquan practitioners can tend to get a little too focused on concrete visualizations as part of Zhan zhuang practice. This can cause your practice to stagnate. Every movement is new with no assumptions about what will happen.

    First you need the courage to engage with your enemy, then you need the ability to close the distance between you and last you need the fist.
    My observation is that expert practitioners/Adepts, move very little - they make YOU move.
    Clearly they are Centred and Present in themselves at this time.

    To draw out the this latter point, they are able to recognise that in Contact, there is space and time hence opportunity and will act/react accordingly.

    As part of the learning process/curve, you can be locked into drills which may not replicate the reality of Contact, as the unexpected has a way of intervening. However, quantity should lead to quality and when 'in the moment', the Adept will likely respond appropriately to the problem posed in Contact. He/She will intuitively know that at any given moment in reality "all is in flux". A verbal example would be Bruce in 'Enter The Dragon' - "the hand, it hits by itself" is a truism of long training and experience. Ingemar Johansson said much the same before he fought Floyd Patterson. To paraphrase, he said that his Right would know when to Strike; his implied point being that if he had to think about throwing it, then it was already too late and the opportunity had gone.

    I also noticed that in the second video, toward the end when he punches, his back foot does not move. To me, this seemed quite telling. He was hitting from the back foot through the body structure into the fist. A likely solid strike - and probably to the core of body (which reduces damage to his knuckles/wrist). Just think about striking the Zygomatic Bone/Arch in the face and the likelihood of injury to your fist.

    Anyway, I may be talking rubbish here so I'll probably have to re-read but hopefully it makes some semblance of sense.

    Cheers
  7. JimDesu is offline

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    Posted On:
    9/12/2012 12:35pm

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    (with my back the way it is, I can't back up what I'm about to say, so just take it as an opinion rather than something than can be proven/demo'd -- if I were coming in without any yiquan background & read this, I'd think the following was totally moon-bat...)

    Quote Originally Posted by Eddie Hardon View Post
    I also noticed that in the second video, toward the end when he punches, his back foot does not move. To me, this seemed quite telling. He was hitting from the back foot through the body structure into the fist. A likely solid strike - and probably to the core of body (which reduces damage to his knuckles/wrist). Just think about striking the Zygomatic Bone/Arch in the face and the likelihood of injury to your fist.
    I have no idea what the rest of your post meant, but the quoted bit's not wrong. It's also not quite right, either. Yiquan is a one-trick pony (but it's a great trick): you use whole body expansion/contraction to harm your opponent. In the case of punching, it's better to think of it as connecting your frame to your adversary, then violently expanding (theoretically, this's six-directional, undirected expansion, but that gets into fiddly, useless terminology I'd rather avoid) into the space occupied by the adversary (harming him in the process).

    The connection of the foot to the ground forces that expansion to occur into your adversary, but that's not too different than good "groundpath" footwork in other martial arts. Any competent boxer pushes off the ground when they hit you (see the myriad of posts on this forum), but in that case, the boxer hits you with his weight, harming the adversary by using the adversary as the fist's crash-pad: the adversary's body is used as the boxer's parking-brake. Rather than explosively accelerating one's mass towards an opponent and then braking using one's fist, a competent yiquan punch is direct expansion into the adversary, with very little net momentum built up. You'll very often see a little "pop" at the end of a yiquan guy's practice punches when there's no target: this can be indicative of someone practicing the transition from "connecting" to "expanding". At much higher levels than I ever achieved, this transition is seamless.

    If you think that through, you'll also understand that a yiquan dude can hit hard bones like the zygomatic arch without hurting their hand, as the yiquan dude's hand isn't crashing into the bone, just hitting hard enough to get a solid connection.
  8. It is Fake is offline
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    Posted On:
    9/12/2012 1:29pm

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     Style: xingyi

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Dude, what you just described exists in boxing and other arts. It's the same argument made by xingyi stylists. Yes, I know of the connection between the two arts. It is a wordy way of saying "internal" Yiquan strike vs "external" boxing strike.
  9. JimDesu is offline

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    Posted On:
    9/12/2012 1:33pm

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    Quote Originally Posted by It is Fake View Post
    It is a wordy way of saying "internal" Yiquan strike vs "external" boxing strike.
    Guilty as charged. Every time I use the word "internal" in such contexts, a great big semantic folderol ensues that completely obscures what everyone was trying to communicate.

    (edit: for what it's worth, wasn't trying to downplay other martial-arts either. I don't mention them because I'm not competent to discuss them.)
    Last edited by JimDesu; 9/12/2012 1:58pm at .
  10. Eddie Hardon is offline

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    Posted On:
    9/12/2012 5:12pm

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     Style: Trad Ju Jitsu

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    JD

    I understood your point well enough.

    My Tai Chi teacher is exceptional in that he came from a hard style background - Full Contact Karate 4th Dan - before he went down the Internal route and is an Adept in Xing Yi and Ba Gua. He also demonstrates points and knows I understand what is displaying (he still amazes me though).

    When all is said and done, a punch in the mouth is still a punch in the mouth.
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