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  1. daishi is offline

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    Posted On:
    9/01/2012 12:17pm


     Style: Aikido/JJJ/Judo/GoJu Ryu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by elipson View Post
    Bananas and protein shake w/cholocate milk.

    What are you fitness goals? That will really impact what kind of nutrition you should pursue.
    Exactly,
    I just try to repair and refine muscle growth whereas my buddy tries to get jacked and takes weight gainer. My other buddy, who I just recontacted with, is actually a power lifter...I intend to hit him up and see what nutrition guideline he goes by...as I'm sure its different.
  2. erezb is offline

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    Posted On:
    9/01/2012 12:46pm


     Style: Boxing,Kickboxing K1

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I want to keep my muscle mass but lose some fat! so this chocolate milk thing, though it sounds like a wet dream, is something ill try to avoid, I try to avoid "Sweet foods". My goals are to get fitter, lose fat and get stronger i guess all common goals. Though getting of age (32 this month) i sometime get cramps from stuff i usually breezed through usually in my legs. I think i need to adjust my diet especially after boxing classes that are brutal. I just do want to lose some fat, so i need a restriction on my calorie intake even after a boxing class. I would prefer getting those calories from feeling foods like rice and spaghetti that will make me feel fool and not go to the fridge.
  3. ChenPengFi is offline
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    Posted On:
    9/01/2012 1:03pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Hung Gar, Choy Lay Fut

    2
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    My understanding is that the primary concerns immediately post-exercise are rehydration and restoration of glycogen stores, not protein.
    Protein is useful post-exercise, but not if it's at the expense of the other two.
    A small amount of protein will benefit carbohydrate absorption post-exercise, but so will increasing the amount and frequency of carb consumption.

    The greater the degree of dehydration, the greater the fluid requirement. However, since dehydration causes a delay in gastric emptying, dehydrated athletes should be wary of taking in large volumes of fluid at one time. Instead, athletes should continually sip on fluids until they feel the dehydration resolving itself. For athletes involved in sequential day practices or competition, the immediate postexercise period is an opportunity to replenish depleted glycogen stores. The enzyme glycogen synthetase is highest when glycogen stores are most depleted. This enzyme converts glucose to glycogen, so consuming high-carbohydrate foods, as tolerated, immediately after exercise is a desirable practice. This practice is inhibited by the relative degree of dehydration experienced by the athlete. The greater the degree of dehydration, the smaller the amount of food tolerated (because of delayed gastric emptying).
    Despite the increased protein requirement for athletes, most athletes consume much more protein (from food alone) than they require. A look at the protein content of some commonly consumed foods demonstrates this point.
    Protein utilization is, to a large degree, a function of total energy intake adequacy. An inadequate total energy intake forces athletes to burn protein for energy, making less protein available for other critical functions.
    There is a common misunderstanding that extra protein intake alone will support a larger muscle mass, and this theory is the main rationale for the large protein intakes seen in many athletes. In fact, additional total calories are required to support a larger muscle mass, and protein should constitute the same relative proportion of the extra calories consumed. For instance, if a 75-kilogram (165 pound) man wishes to increase his muscle mass by 3 kilograms (6.6 pounds), he would need to consume approximately 1.5 additional grams of protein for each kilogram of muscle mass desired. This amounts to only 4.5 grams of additional protein to support the larger muscle mass. By contrast, 30 grams per kilogram of additional carbohydrate, or 90 grams of additional carbohydrate in total, is required to support the larger muscle mass. Here is the total additional caloric requirement represented by the additional muscle:

    4.5 grams protein 4 calories per gram = 18 kilocalories from protein
    90 grams carbohydrate 4 calories per gram = 360 kilocalories from carbohydrate
    Total additional calories = 378 calories per day above current requirements to support a 3-kilogram increase in muscle mass

    Of course, this athlete would also need to stimulate muscle enlargement by undertaking the appropriate strength-building exercises. Otherwise, the extra calories would manifest themselves as stored fat rather than additional muscle. It is likely that the large amount of protein consumed by so many athletes represents the extra calories they require to maintain or enlarge the muscle mass. Although it is certainly possible to use protein as a primary energy source, it is not the most desirable source because of the nitrogenous wastes produced with protein oxidation.

    ...quotes from: http://www.healthline.com/hlbook/adv...orts-nutrition

    ...more here:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9127682
    http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/72/1/106.short

    ...and chocolate milk here (note, not chocolate protein shake, as wabbit implied):
    http://oakbrooksc.com/docs/stager_chocmilk_study.pdf
    Last edited by ChenPengFi; 9/01/2012 1:16pm at .
  4. erezb is offline

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    Posted On:
    9/01/2012 2:02pm


     Style: Boxing,Kickboxing K1

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I'm shocked that someone actually did a study on the sports benefits of chocolate milk!!! I think or at least i guess it is beneficial to athletes that have more than one session a day, but if you are trying to lose some weight, and you have the whole night to rest, it is probably not needed. Thenx for the articles!!!
  5. ChenPengFi is offline
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    Posted On:
    9/01/2012 2:17pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Hung Gar, Choy Lay Fut

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by erezb View Post
    I'm shocked that someone actually did a study on the sports benefits of chocolate milk!!! I think or at least i guess it is beneficial to athletes that have more than one session a day, but if you are trying to lose some weight, and you have the whole night to rest, it is probably not needed. Thenx for the articles!!!
    Chocolate milk is cheap, widely available and effective.
    (That sounds awfully familiar.)
    That it tastes good makes you more likely to drink it, many sports drinks are bland or downright awful.
    I'd argue that used properly, that is in this context as a recovery drink, it would not have a negative impact on your training or weight-loss goals.
  6. erezb is offline

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    Posted On:
    9/01/2012 2:20pm


     Style: Boxing,Kickboxing K1

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I can give it a go, though i'll have troubles convincing the misses that it's not me falling from the diet wagon but rather it's for medicinal use.
  7. daishi is offline

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    Posted On:
    9/01/2012 5:27pm


     Style: Aikido/JJJ/Judo/GoJu Ryu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by ChenPengFi View Post
    My understanding is that the primary concerns immediately post-exercise are rehydration and restoration of glycogen stores, not protein.
    Protein is useful post-exercise, but not if it's at the expense of the other two.
    A small amount of protein will benefit carbohydrate absorption post-exercise, but so will increasing the amount and frequency of carb consumption.










    ...quotes from: http://www.healthline.com/hlbook/adv...orts-nutrition

    ...more here:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9127682
    http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/72/1/106.short

    ...and chocolate milk here (note, not chocolate protein shake, as wabbit implied):
    http://oakbrooksc.com/docs/stager_chocmilk_study.pdf
    I'm not a dietitian, but I've been told the purpose for consuming moderate amounts of protein immediately after workouts is for repairing micro-tears in muscle fiber. There are also acids and other elements contained within post-workout recovery beverages that aid in the efficiency in which the protein is transported to the muscle fibers. Also, its important to note your body can only efficiently utilize a certain amount of protein at any given time...everything else will be processed out by the liver and wasted.
  8. ChenPengFi is offline
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    Posted On:
    9/01/2012 5:37pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Hung Gar, Choy Lay Fut

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Poke around the links i provided, that's all covered therein.
  9. TheMightyMcClaw is offline
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    Posted On:
    9/16/2012 10:37am

    supporting member
     Style: MMA

    4
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    My own research has also indicated that chocolate milk is also delicious.
    The fool thinks himself immortal,
    If he hold back from battle;
    But old age will grant him no truce,
    Even if spears spare him.
  10. Eddie Hardon is offline

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    Posted On:
    9/16/2012 4:17pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Trad Ju Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Just watch out that you don't pass Wind (Fart) on the Pyroclastic (I think that's the word I want) scale.

    I have a student, who in recent weeks dealt such a fearsome fart that I almost had to call an evacuation of the effing building.

    It was the second week that I realised it must have been him. I surmise Weights and a Protein Shake before he came to JJ training (he's a long-standing Brown who thinks it's about time he took his Dan Grading. If he Trumps in that...we'll have to clear the Dojo).
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