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  1. Mr. Machette is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/27/2012 2:12pm

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    Quote Originally Posted by mike321 View Post
    Help me out here: does the lower have the serial number on the part he printed? Is that the part that triggers the background check?
    Yes. Yes it does.
  2. mike321 is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/27/2012 3:18pm


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    Quote Originally Posted by Devil View Post
    Yes, it is.
    Thanks. So one enforcement mechanism has already been circumvented. I know the law does not change but the background check is a preventative measure. Will this become a widespread thing? If so how should laws be adjusted?
  3. ignatzami is offline
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    Posted On:
    8/27/2012 3:38pm


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    My thoughts with 3D printing are more for rapid prototyping. What if I wanted to custom build a firearm, and needed to make sure that the parts all fit together, that the stock had the right feel, and dimensions for my body. I could spit a stock out of plastic, verify that things snapped together correctly, and then ship the design off to a legit mill shop to be made out of billet.

    I foresee this making custom anything, much cheaper, and quicker. Be in guns, or car parts, or flower pots.
    I do not aspire to be great, or even good, I hope to suck a little less then last class.
  4. Mr. Machette is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/27/2012 3:56pm

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    Quote Originally Posted by mike321 View Post
    Thanks. So one enforcement mechanism has already been circumvented. I know the law does not change but the background check is a preventative measure. Will this become a widespread thing? If so how should laws be adjusted?
    Yes and no. The Eugene Stoner designed rifles are unique AFAIK in that the serial numbered part is only half of the actual receiver. (Lower half) Where as all the parts that actualy deal with detonation and projection of the round are in the upper, non-serialized part.

    Any schmo can buy and upper assembly and even have it delivered to their home without paper work. That makes it "theroectically" possible for someone to print a lower, pay cash for an upper at the local fun store and have a completely undocumented modern rifle.

    Other interesting factors would be the ability to produce lowers compatible with full auto components such as the DIAS.

    It definitely creates a quandry, but only within a certain family of rifles and it's still not anywhere as close to "push a button, out pops a rifle" as the tittle would imply.
    Quote Originally Posted by ignatzami View Post
    My thoughts with 3D printing are more for rapid prototyping. What if I wanted to custom build a firearm, and needed to make sure that the parts all fit together, that the stock had the right feel, and dimensions for my body. I could spit a stock out of plastic, verify that things snapped together correctly, and then ship the design off to a legit mill shop to be made out of billet.

    I foresee this making custom anything, much cheaper, and quicker. Be in guns, or car parts, or flower pots.
    This is exactly what these machines were created for and they are all but ubiquitous in any shop that can afford one these days. Great tool for people who do any kind of casting.
  5. chainpunch is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/27/2012 3:57pm

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    Quote Originally Posted by mike321 View Post
    Thanks. So one enforcement mechanism has already been circumvented. I know the law does not change but the background check is a preventative measure. Will this become a widespread thing? If so how should laws be adjusted?
    It is legal to build your own firearm and not imprint a serial number. If you can legally own it you can build it just not sell it.

    Criminals can easily purchase or acquire what they want and do not need to invest time and effort to make part of a weapon when for much less they can buy the whole firearm.
  6. ignatzami is offline
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    Posted On:
    8/28/2012 4:57pm


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    Quote Originally Posted by chainpunch View Post
    Criminals can easily purchase or acquire what they want and do not need to invest time and effort to make part of a weapon when for much less they can buy the whole firearm.
    I agree, but I think we're focusing too much on the criminal element. You're right, this is a ridiculous way for a criminal to get a hold of a gun. It's a ridiculous way for anyone to get a hold of a gun. However, I think it's a very smart way for someone with a firearm, and the desire to modify said firearm, to do so quickly, and inexpensively.

    Rapid proto-typing, which 3D printing is, isn't meant to replace traditional manufacturing. It's meant to make the prototyping phase cheaper, and quicker, then it's traditionally been.

    I see this as being a huge leap forward for designers of any tangible product, be it car parts, firearms, or tea kettles. It's a way to see how an idea would look, and feel, in the real world, for pennies when compared to traditional methods.
    I do not aspire to be great, or even good, I hope to suck a little less then last class.
  7. mike321 is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/28/2012 6:22pm


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    I suspect legal acquisition of any firearm without a background check will bother a lot of people.
  8. Mr. Machette is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/28/2012 7:12pm

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    Quote Originally Posted by mike321 View Post
    I suspect legal acquisition of any firearm without a background check will bother a lot of people.
    "Legal without background check" is actually possible in a lot of places. Here in Oregon for instance. Also CCW permits are "shall issue" and NFA items are just a tax stamp away. Automatic folding knives, brass knuckles and ninja throwing stars are readily available as well.

    None of those things are "legally" possible where you live.

    Guess which state has more gun violence between the two of us?
  9. mike321 is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/28/2012 7:29pm


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    I am sure California with its laws has more. I have never felt secure in any way as a result of any restrictions we have enacted here. Outside of the debate people have over whether these laws work, I find the inability to enforce them due to disrupting technology fascinating.
  10. Mr. Machette is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/28/2012 7:35pm

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    Quote Originally Posted by mike321 View Post
    I am sure California with its laws has more. I have never felt secure in any way as a result of any restrictions we have enacted here. Outside of the debate people have over whether these laws work, I find the inability to enforce them due to disrupting technology fascinating.
    Me too. March of progress mang.

    2000 years ago salt was currency and as such it would have been a tightly controled and highly coveted comodity.

    Now it's so common it's given out for free with your meal.

    Due to the huge amounts of electricity required for its production, aluminum was worth more than gold in the 19th century. Now it's so cheap people throw it away.

    Someday making "gun type" weapons will be about as exotic as making a cross bow.

    Hopefully we'll be more evolved by that time.
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