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  1. Permalost is offline
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    pro nonsense self defense

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    Posted On:
    10/10/2012 4:46pm

    supporting member
     Style: FMA, dumbek, Indian clubs

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Smackjack View Post
    Not the superman punch, I have this bad habit of "floating?" so it's easily seen from me.
    Sounds like a good opportunity to develop a new technique while breaking a bad habit.
  2. Smackjack is offline

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    Posted On:
    10/10/2012 6:04pm


     Style: Tkd,mauythai,bjj,boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Permalost View Post
    Sounds like a good opportunity to develop a new technique while breaking a bad habit.

    Thank you! I've been trying to develop something like this for a few years, if anyone would like to chime in: I was a starting left wing soccer player for most of my life, and I can triple my weight with calf muscle workouts after I tried out for the weight lift team at my school. Legs were a big thing then. I can do a 720 jump spin heel kick, but that's too much hang time.

    The only thing I developed is I am able to leap away about 6-9 feet from someone's combo (easily) without getting hit with good timing. I got the idea from Muhammad Ali, after watching his defensive maneuvers so much. As funny as it sounds. It also pisses of my opponent to exert more energy. Some call it "running away", but my first coach calls it "being mobile".
  3. Mr. Machette is offline

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    Posted On:
    10/10/2012 6:14pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: FMA, Ego Warrior

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Smackjack View Post
    I am able to leap away about 6-9 feet from someone's combo (easily) without getting hit with good timing. Some call it "running away", but my first coach calls it "being mobile".
    There's no shame in evasive maneuvering. That said, being airborn while someone is activley trying to find ways to hurt you has it's own set of dangers and disadvantages. YMMV.
  4. Permalost is offline
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    pro nonsense self defense

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    Posted On:
    10/10/2012 6:17pm

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     Style: FMA, dumbek, Indian clubs

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Smackjack View Post
    The only thing I developed is I am able to leap away about 6-9 feet from someone's combo (easily) without getting hit with good timing.
    and you're saying you shouldn't be using the superman punch?
  5. Smackjack is offline

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    Posted On:
    10/10/2012 7:00pm


     Style: Tkd,mauythai,bjj,boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Permalost View Post
    and you're saying you shouldn't be using the superman punch?
    My hang time is to much when I attempt it, and or this guy is pretty good, please tell me if I'm wrong but when a guy jumps and has his shoulder "cocked" what will you expect? Real talk. Thank you for being serious too btw permalost.
  6. Vince Tortelli is offline

    Light Heavyweight

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    Posted On:
    10/10/2012 7:46pm

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    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Smackjack View Post
    Excuse me for my lack of understanding but all names for techniques are different in styles in my experience do you think you could post a pic of a gif?
    Can do hoss.
    [All notes and pictures copypasted directly from an article by the great Jack Slack on Bloody Elbow dot com, no way I can break technique down this good.]

    The Left Straight / Left High Kick Double Threat
    The first question that should be raised whenever considering Mirko Cro Cop is "How on earth did he kick so many people in the head when they knew he was going to try to do it?". The key was to establish a double threat between the left straight and the left high kick. The double attack is a common idea in BJJ but is not talked about in striking martial arts despite it's effectiveness and almost every effective striker using one or more variations on this principle. The idea of a double attack is to use one attack to open the path for the other and vice versa. Throughout his fights Cro Cop would switch between the left high kick and left straight and eventually would catch his opponent. Another excellent example of a fighter who uses one double threat to the exclusion of all else is Sergei Kharitanov, who throws the right hook to the body and head alternately, attempting to catch his opponent off guard.
    The traditional, basic defense for the high kick is to take the kick on the solid bone of the forearm - away from the head. Starting in this position so as to be ready for the kick, however, opened a large hole for Mirko's southpaw left straight. Many opponents would then begin to try to cover or rear hand parry Mirko's rear straight, whereupon their hand would come inside of their shoulder and would be unable to block his legendary high kick. What added to the effectiveness of this double attack is that the preliminary motions to both Mirko's high kick and left straight were very similar. Notice here a fantastic example of Cro Cop using this double attack against Igor Vovchanchyn - one of the best heavyweight strikers in MMA. (G) (V)

    In the top two frames you can see Mirko fluster Vovchanchyn with the left straight, which Vovchanchyn ducks out of the way of and parries with his rear hand - not great form. In the bottom two stills you can see that Vovchanchyn's hand is no longer in a position to block the high kick, as it was for the first part of the fight, and as Cro Cop moves towards him he attempts to parry the left straight. Notice how Vovchanchyn's hand is moving in the opposite direction to the high kick just before it connects. This double attack was the key to much of Cro Cop's success. Another excellent example of Cro Cop using this double attack was against Mark Hunt in K-1. When Hunt attempted to slip outside of Cro Cop's faked straight, he ducked directly into Mirko's left shin.

    What happened to this double attack then? For a start Cro Cop's left straight relied largely on his speed, as he would rarely get into good position to throw it (with his lead foot outside his opponent's), but rather throw it when he felt he could. This reliance on speed meant that he became timid to throw it once he began colliding with his opponent on the way in. In his meeting with Gonzaga, Cro Cop circled left and attempted to throw a left straight at the start of the bout but got clipped himself because he has not assumed a good position from which to punch. For the rest of this match and his others there was a marked timidness about throwing the left straight, which in turn allowed his opponents to step in and swing at him, and focus wholly on defending the high kick.
  7. Smackjack is offline

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    Posted On:
    10/10/2012 8:46pm


     Style: Tkd,mauythai,bjj,boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Vince Tortelli View Post
    Can do hoss.
    [All notes and pictures copypasted directly from an article by the great Jack Slack on Bloody Elbow dot com, no way I can break technique down this good.]

    The Left Straight / Left High Kick Double Threat
    The first question that should be raised whenever considering Mirko Cro Cop is "How on earth did he kick so many people in the head when they knew he was going to try to do it?". The key was to establish a double threat between the left straight and the left high kick. The double attack is a common idea in BJJ but is not talked about in striking martial arts despite it's effectiveness and almost every effective striker using one or more variations on this principle. The idea of a double attack is to use one attack to open the path for the other and vice versa. Throughout his fights Cro Cop would switch between the left high kick and left straight and eventually would catch his opponent. Another excellent example of a fighter who uses one double threat to the exclusion of all else is Sergei Kharitanov, who throws the right hook to the body and head alternately, attempting to catch his opponent off guard.
    The traditional, basic defense for the high kick is to take the kick on the solid bone of the forearm - away from the head. Starting in this position so as to be ready for the kick, however, opened a large hole for Mirko's southpaw left straight. Many opponents would then begin to try to cover or rear hand parry Mirko's rear straight, whereupon their hand would come inside of their shoulder and would be unable to block his legendary high kick. What added to the effectiveness of this double attack is that the preliminary motions to both Mirko's high kick and left straight were very similar. Notice here a fantastic example of Cro Cop using this double attack against Igor Vovchanchyn - one of the best heavyweight strikers in MMA. (G) (V)

    In the top two frames you can see Mirko fluster Vovchanchyn with the left straight, which Vovchanchyn ducks out of the way of and parries with his rear hand - not great form. In the bottom two stills you can see that Vovchanchyn's hand is no longer in a position to block the high kick, as it was for the first part of the fight, and as Cro Cop moves towards him he attempts to parry the left straight. Notice how Vovchanchyn's hand is moving in the opposite direction to the high kick just before it connects. This double attack was the key to much of Cro Cop's success. Another excellent example of Cro Cop using this double attack was against Mark Hunt in K-1. When Hunt attempted to slip outside of Cro Cop's faked straight, he ducked directly into Mirko's left shin.

    What happened to this double attack then? For a start Cro Cop's left straight relied largely on his speed, as he would rarely get into good position to throw it (with his lead foot outside his opponent's), but rather throw it when he felt he could. This reliance on speed meant that he became timid to throw it once he began colliding with his opponent on the way in. In his meeting with Gonzaga, Cro Cop circled left and attempted to throw a left straight at the start of the bout but got clipped himself because he has not assumed a good position from which to punch. For the rest of this match and his others there was a marked timidness about throwing the left straight, which in turn allowed his opponents to step in and swing at him, and focus wholly on defending the high kick.
    I've seen/learned this particular attack before, we practice it almost every other day. Any other recommendation? From that at starting point, I do a right hook, left round house,(planted foot) right hook, left hook, right straight, left thrust sliding-kick. He moves out of range from combo, I end with a spin side kick in lieu.
  8. Israfel is offline

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    Posted On:
    10/12/2012 2:16am


     Style: Muay Thai

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Since I'm a southpaw, probably the plain old left roundhouse kick to the liver.


    Or dodging a righty's jab to the right and hooking the body followed with an elbow
  9. Permalost is offline
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    pro nonsense self defense

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    Posted On:
    10/12/2012 11:53am

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     Style: FMA, dumbek, Indian clubs

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Smackjack View Post
    My hang time is to much when I attempt it, and or this guy is pretty good, please tell me if I'm wrong but when a guy jumps and has his shoulder "cocked" what will you expect? Real talk.
    Copied from my post in the Goju sparring thread:
    "The key to this one, like the first one, is not to try to swoop straight in with an unorthodox haymaker. You aren't trying to make them in awe of your awesome superman jump above their head- you're trying to move horizontally for the most part. You should do this after throwing several kicks to elicit a default reaction that'll open up the head. A lot of people do this with a leg kick but I prefer to use a front kick because the hip is at a better position to quickly reverse to throw the leg back, which tips the torso into position."
    So the first thing your opponent should see is an incoming kick they've seen before, not a jumping guy, and just because you can doesn't mean you have to do a big dramatic jump like Achilles in Troy.

    The shoulder shouldn't be "cocked" before doing a superman punch. The reversal of the leg throws the shoulder forward as its punching, so no need to cock it before. The leg and torso dynamics will ensure that you'll hit hard with zero windup.


    Thank you for being serious too btw permalost.
    Yes, the "what's your favorite technique to use for fun" thread in the Your Martial Arts Sucks forum is serious business.
  10. Smackjack is offline

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    Posted On:
    10/16/2012 7:14pm


     Style: Tkd,mauythai,bjj,boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    What about a 360 jump-spin hook(punch)?
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