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  1. doofaloofa is offline
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    I'm Svelte!

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    Posted On:
    8/05/2012 4:22pm

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Fair Play

    Question.

    Do you think it is fair that giant countries such as the USA and China should compete with small countries on an even footing or should each state/province compete as a seperate sporting entity

    Pesonally I think it unfair that these Super Powers with thier population and resources should go into world events to compete against, hmmmm lets say, Ireland, with our tiny 6 million population (How many people live in your city?)

    How do we make international competition fair to the smaller countries, or should US/China compete against the EU, or Africa etc?
    Considered in the abstract the boxing ring is an altar of sorts, one of those legendary spaces where the laws of a nation are suspended: inside the ropes, during an officially regulated three-minute round, a man may be killed by his opponent's hands but he cannot be legally murdered. Boxing inhabits a sacred space predating civilization; or, to use D.H. Lawrence's phrase, before God was love. If it suggests a savage ceremony or a rite of atonement it also suggests the futility of such gestures. For what possible atonement is the fight waged if it must shortly be waged again... and again? The boxing match is the very image, the more terrifying for being so stylized, of mankind's collective aggression; its ongoing historical madness.
    Joyce Carol Oates, On Boxing
  2. ChenPengFi is offline
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    Posted On:
    8/05/2012 4:34pm

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Maybe if you guys were part of the UK team...

  3. doofaloofa is offline
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    Posted On:
    8/05/2012 4:38pm

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    Quote Originally Posted by ChenPengFi View Post
    Maybe if you guys were part of the UK team...

    That's pretty funny, though it also illustrates my point somewhat. More people live in London than in Ireland. I'm sure we could beat London at some sport or other

    What is the population of Hawai'i
    Considered in the abstract the boxing ring is an altar of sorts, one of those legendary spaces where the laws of a nation are suspended: inside the ropes, during an officially regulated three-minute round, a man may be killed by his opponent's hands but he cannot be legally murdered. Boxing inhabits a sacred space predating civilization; or, to use D.H. Lawrence's phrase, before God was love. If it suggests a savage ceremony or a rite of atonement it also suggests the futility of such gestures. For what possible atonement is the fight waged if it must shortly be waged again... and again? The boxing match is the very image, the more terrifying for being so stylized, of mankind's collective aggression; its ongoing historical madness.
    Joyce Carol Oates, On Boxing
  4. lordbd is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/05/2012 4:40pm


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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Isn't it about NATIONS coming together to compete though? Not a representative unit of random people.
  5. The Question is offline
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    Posted On:
    8/05/2012 4:43pm

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    Quote Originally Posted by doofaloofa View Post
    Question.
    Yeah, what up? You made a whole thread just to holla at me?
    Do you think it is fair that giant countries such as the USA and China should compete with small countries on an even footing or should each state/province compete as a seperate sporting entity

    Pesonally I think it unfair that these Super Powers with thier population and resources should go into world events to compete against, hmmmm lets say, Ireland, with our tiny 6 million population (How many people live in your city?)

    How do we make international competition fair to the smaller countries, or should US/China compete against the EU, or Africa etc?
    LOL. **** that. All of the Americans and the Chinese put together couldn't smell Usain Bolt on the track.
    Because Bolt is the fucking man. Excuse me while I nutride, but did you see that ****? Did you fucking see that ****? 9.63 to add to his 9.58 and 9.69?
    And Yohan Blake, also Jamaican was in second, 9.75. Gay and Gatlin of the USA almost had an Asthma attack because of all the dust they inhaled.

    But I see your point. But breaking **** up into States/Provinces would be pointless. I mean, what the **** is Alaska going to do?

    Also, I like to judge that **** based on medals per capita. Jamaica will win 20 medals this year. We have 3 million people. That's 6.7 x 10^-6 medals per capita. The US may win 100 medals, but they have 300 million people, so that's 3 x 10^-7 medals per capita. Jamaica has them beat by at least one order of magnitude. It's motherfucking science, bro.
    Quote Originally Posted by Goju - joe
    being a dick with skill is only marginally better than being a dick without skill.
  6. goodlun is offline
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    Posted On:
    8/05/2012 4:43pm

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I think its even less about having the population to draw from does it help sure but with size I do believe you have a point of dimensioning returns. Hence why China, India, Russia, and the US are not the only medal winners.
    I think a bigger indicator of tipping the balance are the resources involved.
    For something that was suppose to be amateur competitors its anything but in the US, the old USSR and now China.
  7. It is Fake is offline
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    Posted On:
    8/05/2012 4:47pm

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by doofaloofa View Post
    How do we make international competition fair to the smaller countries, or should US/China compete against the EU, or Africa etc?
    Best in the world right?
    No it is fine.

    For something that was suppose to be amateur competitors its anything but in the US,
    How so? It depends on the sport. Please, please please don't use basketball.
  8. ChenPengFi is offline
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    Posted On:
    8/05/2012 4:58pm

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    We have 1 million and get occasional medals, quit your crying.

    From 1924:



    to the modern times, Hawai'i does quite well.
    From Beijing:

    Robyn Ah Mow-Santos (Honolulu, McKinley 1993, UH 1993-96), women's volleyball, won a silver medal at her third Games. The Americans' starting setter and captain led her team to its first medal in 16 years, and its second appearance ever in a gold-medal match.

    Lindsey Berg (Honolulu, Punahou 1998), women's volleyball, won a silver medal at her second Games. Berg, the back-up setter, played often and came off the bench against Italy to serve to 8-0 and 5-0 leads in the fourth and fifth games of the quarterfinal victory.



    Brandon Brooks (Honolulu, Punahou 1999), men's water polo team, won a silver medal today at his second Olympic Games. Brooks, the backup goalie after starting every match in 2004, saw his first action in the loss to Hungary in the gold medal match.

    Clarissa Chun (Kapolei, Roosevelt 1999), 48 kg (105.5 pounds) wrestling, lost in bronze-medal match to 2004 gold medalist Irini Merleni of Ukraine. After winning the first two matches, Chun fell to world champion Chiharu Icho of Japan in the semifinals in an overtime tiebreaker (last to score).

    Bryan Clay (Kane'ohe, Castle 1998), decathlon, won the gold medal with 8,791 points after capturing silver at Athens in 2004. Clay won the first two events and never trailed, setting an Olympic decathlon record in discus, a personal record in shotput and a season best in long jump.

    Daniel Coakley (Makapala, Kealakehe 2007), Philippines swimming team, finished 39th in 50-meter freestyle qualifying heats in personal-best time of 22.69. Coakley holds the Hawai'i state high school record in 50 free.




    Jared Heine (Honolulu, Damien 2002), Marshall Islands swimming, became first in history to compete for Marshall Islands, finishing 43rd in 100 backstroke qualifying heats. Time of 58.86 equaled career best he set two years ago.

    Anju Jason (Honolulu, Radford 2005), Marshall Islands under-80 kg (170 pounds) tae kwon do. One of five athletes on the Marshallese team, Jason lost his opening match to Great Britain's Aaron Cook.

    Natasha Kai (Kahuku, Kahuku 2001, UH 2002-05), women's soccer, won gold medal, defeating Brazil 1-0 in final. Kai, who did not start for the U.S., scored her only goal on a header in extra time that beat Canada 2-1 in quarterfinals.



    Christel Simms ('Ewa Beach, Punahou 2009), Philippines swimming, finished 41st in 100-meter freestyle qualifying heats and 47th in 50-meter free. Her 100 time of 56.67 beat her previous best by half a second; her 26.64 in the 50 was just off her personal best (26.31).




    Clay Stanley (Honolulu, Kaiser 1996, UH 1997, 1999-2000), men's volleyball, won gold yesterday, the men's first medal since 1992. Stanley entered the gold-medal match leading the tournament in kills and aces, and scored 15 more kills and two more aces.

    Taylor Takata (Wahiawa, 'Iolani 2000), 66-kg (145.5 pounds) judo, finished ninth at 2-2. Hawai'i's fourth Olympic judoka won first two matches in overtime, but lost to Cuba's Yordanis Arencibia, the 2004 bronze medalist, in the quarterfinals. Loss in first repechage (second-chance) match eliminated him from medal competition.



    (Nice job from hometown kid Bryan Clay.)

    So yeah, quit crying, you're a *****.
    I even left out the ones that didn't actually grow up here.

    http://the.honoluluadvertiser.com/ar...808240386.html
  9. goodlun is offline
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    Posted On:
    8/05/2012 4:59pm

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    Quote Originally Posted by It is Fake View Post
    Best in the world right?
    No it is fine.

    How so? It depends on the sport. Please, please please don't use basketball.
    Its more of the chance for a pretty sizable finical reward in the form of endorsements then anything else. If you get a gold your going to be on a wheaties box, Nike is going to make a shoe, and so on and so forth.
    While certainly an outlier Michael Phelps worth ~40 million and certainly to grow by even more.
    http://www.enstarz.com/articles/4942...ortunities.htm
  10. daishi is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/05/2012 5:02pm


     Style: Aikido/JJJ/Judo/GoJu Ryu

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by doofaloofa View Post
    Question.

    Do you think it is fair that giant countries such as the USA and China should compete with small countries on an even footing or should each state/province compete as a seperate sporting entity

    Pesonally I think it unfair that these Super Powers with thier population and resources should go into world events to compete against, hmmmm lets say, Ireland, with our tiny 6 million population (How many people live in your city?)

    How do we make international competition fair to the smaller countries, or should US/China compete against the EU, or Africa etc?
    A little less than 18,000 people live in my city and we've had a couple Olympians.
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