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  1. Big Bear is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/04/2012 4:15am


     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    For the Judoka on the board

    Hey, all, I had a question of curiosity: How long was it into your training before you really felt confident and competent with Judo? I've been doing it all of 2 weeks, now and may actually have O Goshi and O Soto Gari down at a beginner's level of 'good'. I found that learning those two (just those two) filled me with a lot of confidence, but with a bit of dread as well regarding the total size of the catalog of Judo techniques left to learn (let alone master).

    Also - it was hella fun being thrown for the first time. got me over a huge bit of anxiety with it. Now my anxiety is in performing the techniques. I know I'm new, and my performances will LOOK like a new person is performing them, but I still have a bit of trepidation in learning a new throw, cuz I'm afraid I'll look like a dingbat.:FullPanel:
  2. Ming Loyalist is offline
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    solves problems with violence

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    Posted On:
    8/04/2012 10:23am

    supporting member
     Style: Judo, Hung Family Boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    even without knowing you or watching your judo, after 2 weeks i can tell you that you do not know o soto gari or o goshi, even at a beginners level. your judo is going to be terrible for a long time, and that's OK, everyone goes through that.

    try to learn a few throws (at least one in each direction) your coach will help with that. then work on them in uchi-komi and randori. once you get to yellow belt, learn a few more, then after green belt maybe you should chose your main throw that works for you, and a couple others that transition to or from it and work hard on those. compete, learn more, add more throws and tactics, rinse and repeat.

    learning judo is a very long process, and is very worthwhile.
    "Face punches are an essential character building part of a martial art. You don't truly love your children unless you allow them to get punched in the face." - chi-conspiricy
    "When I was a little boy, I had a sailor suit, but it didn't mean I was in the Navy." - Mtripp on the subject of a 5 year old karate black belt
    "Without actual qualifications to be a Zen teacher, your instructor is just another roundeye raping Asian culture for a buck." - Errant108
    "Seriously, who gives a **** what you or Errant think? You're Asian males, everyone just ignores you, unless you're in a krotty movie." - new2bjj
  3. hathor is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/04/2012 10:27am


     Style: Judo, BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I've only been doing it for three years and have my brown belt test next month; I still feel inadequate at times and I train about 4-5 nights a week and love to go to tournaments. And I really wouldn't have it any other way, because it encourages me to have an open mind and not get caught up in my own BS. When a really good blackbelt comes through and just tools you again and again, you realize how small a fish you really are. The feeling of having something click after a while and you realize how to optimize it for your own game is a wonderful thing indeed.

    That being said, I enjoy every night of Judo, even when I am having an off night. And I guarantee that any sort of confidence you feel about your moves will evaporate in six months when nothing works for you. Then the confidence will return when something clicks, then six months later you won't be able to do anything right. etc.. I think it's called progress. Good journeys to you
  4. italian judoka is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/04/2012 10:45am


     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    2 weeks?
    Even after 8 years of pratice my sensei can ever found and fix errors in my techniques.
    Judo is a never ending lerning.
  5. hathor is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/04/2012 10:52am


     Style: Judo, BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Ehi italian Judoka, dove fai Judo? I trained in Siena for a while at Centro Garyu when I was studying abroad, if that means anything. Good times there
  6. Big Bear is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/04/2012 11:54am


     

    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Ming Loyalist View Post
    even without knowing you or watching your judo, after 2 weeks i can tell you that you do not know o soto gari or o goshi, even at a beginners level.<snip>learning judo is a very long process, and is very worthwhile.
    Ouch! Thanks for your honesty - I needed that, I imagine.

    Quote Originally Posted by hathor View Post
    you realize how small a fish you really are.
    This one I was already aware of, ha ha! But thank you nonetheless.

    Quote Originally Posted by italian judoka View Post
    2 weeks?
    Even after 8 years of pratice my sensei can ever found and fix errors in my techniques.
    Judo is a never ending lerning.
    Thanks :)
  7. Ming Loyalist is offline
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    solves problems with violence

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    Posted On:
    8/04/2012 12:14pm

    supporting member
     Style: Judo, Hung Family Boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Big Bear View Post
    Ouch! Thanks for your honesty - I needed that, I imagine.
    no worries. trust me, i had been training kung fu for 15 years, and had been coaching sanda for over 5 years when i started judo. i thought i knew a lot about throwing people (throws are a big part of sanda) and that judo would help me "tune up" the throws i knew. turns out i knew very little about throwing people.

    3 years later and with a brown belt, i still know very little about throwing people, but i know a lot more than i did at the start.

    my sensei (8th dan) and his son (5th dan, and 2 time national champ) both know a lot about throwing people. a couple of the higher level black belts in the dojo know quite a bit about throwing people, but the rest of us are pretty much noobs in the big picture, and will be for a very very long time.
    "Face punches are an essential character building part of a martial art. You don't truly love your children unless you allow them to get punched in the face." - chi-conspiricy
    "When I was a little boy, I had a sailor suit, but it didn't mean I was in the Navy." - Mtripp on the subject of a 5 year old karate black belt
    "Without actual qualifications to be a Zen teacher, your instructor is just another roundeye raping Asian culture for a buck." - Errant108
    "Seriously, who gives a **** what you or Errant think? You're Asian males, everyone just ignores you, unless you're in a krotty movie." - new2bjj
  8. Big Bear is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/04/2012 12:20pm


     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Ming Loyalist View Post
    and will be for a very very long time.
    That's that oft-maligned ego bit I've got to work out, I'm imagining.
  9. judoka_uk is offline
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    Posted On:
    8/04/2012 1:33pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Judo

    4
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    As others have said after two weeks you're not at any level definable as good.

    For me I started feeling that I was competent at Judo 2 years after having got my dan grade, 3 years after I had started Judo.

    As for being bewildered by the sheer number of throws that's pretty common. First thing you need to do is ditch O goshi, just practice it when your coach tells you to and apart from that forget about it.

    This is for 2 reasons:
    1. To perform it in randori requires a change of grip from sleeve and lapel. Beginners will always find that it is impossible to pull of because as soon as they let go of the lapel and go round the back everyone know's what they're going to do.

    2. If you start off using solely a round the back grip you will lock yourself into a frustrating spiral of slow progress ending in sloppy technique, because you missed out fundamental skills.

    Fundamentals skills which can only be learnt from sleeve and lapel i.e tsurikomi, elbow management, t-ing up, managing space etc...

    The only throws you should think about practising until you get your dan grade are these from the first and second sets of the Gokyo.

    Dai Ikkyo
    De ashi barai
    Hiza guruma
    Sasae tsurikomi ashi
    Uki goshi
    O soto gari
    O goshi
    O uchi gari
    Seoi nage

    Dai Nikyo
    Ko soto gari
    Ko uchi gari
    Koshi guruma
    Tsurikomi goshi
    Okuri ashi barai
    Tai otoshi
    Harai goshi
    Uchi mata

    From this list of of 16 techniques you should pick 4.


    Major forward technique
    Complimentary ashiwaza

    Major backwards technique
    Complimentary ashiwaza


    Looking back at the two sets of the Gokyo you will notice that there is a wide selection of ‘major’ techniques and ashiwaza to go with them.

    Techniques that are generally considered ‘major’:
    Uki goshi
    O soto gari
    O goshi
    Seoi nage
    Koshi guruma
    Tsurikomi goshi
    Tai otoshi
    Uchi mata
    Harai goshi

    Techniques that are generally considered complimentary ashiwaza:
    De ashi barai
    Hiza guruma
    Sasae tsurikomi ashi
    O uchi gari
    Ko soto gari
    Ko uchi gari
    Okuri ashi barai

    There are some cross overs but this is a rough division.

    So let’s look at a few examples of technique tables you could build:

    Major forward technique – Uchi mata
    Complimentary ashiwaza – O uchi gari

    Major backwards technique – O soto gari
    Complimentary ashiwaza – Sasae tsurikomi ashi

    -------------------------------------------------

    Major forward technique – Tai otoshi
    Complimentary ashiwaza – Ko uchi gari

    Major backwards technique - O uchi gari
    Complimentary ashiwaza – Ko uchi gari

    -------------------------------------------------

    Major forward technique – Harai goshi
    Complimentary ashiwaza – O soto gari

    Major backwards technique – O uchi gari
    Complimentary ashiwaza – Okui ashi barai

    The reason that you should try and fit the techniques that standout for you into the catergories as above is that it allows you to create not only a idea of techniques that you are going to concentrate on but it gets you to think about linking techniques and developing effective combinations. The logic behind which techniques you combine with others is to take advantage of the likely potential actions and reactions of your opponent. So an O soto gari is likely to get a resisting forward reaction which can then be capitalised on with a Sasae tsurikomi ashi etc...

    If you're quick witted and or lazy you will have noticed that you can effectively halve your workload by being smart about which techniques you choose. For example you can have:

    Major forward technique – Uchi mata
    Complimentary ashiwaza – O uchi gari

    Major backwards technique – O soto gari
    Complimentary ashiwaza – O uchi gari

    Thus you only have three techniques that you need to concentrate on and all the three techniques can be used as either a primary or secondary attack for the other. I can attack with O uchi gari and then with O soto gari, O soto gari then Uchi mata, Uchi mata then O uchi gari etc... etc...

    Reducing your workload as such can be helpful because it means you always know what you’re going to work on during uchikomi and nagekomi, when it comes to combination practice you never have to stop and try and work out what to combine with what you just practice your set of combinable techniques.

    Go forth and prosper.
  10. italian judoka is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/04/2012 2:01pm


     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by hathor View Post
    Ehi italian Judoka, dove fai Judo? I trained in Siena for a while at Centro Garyu when I was studying abroad, if that means anything. Good times there
    In Rome, Centro Ferrini.
    You have studied in Siena. It's a very nice town.

    Nice to meet you.
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