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  1. #11

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Tui Na is what I would most like to learn. I had thoughts years ago of being a massage therapist. I'm really enjoying Bisio's book for that reason. Its all about simple sports medicine applications of TCM. Nothing beats a real trained professional though.

  2. #12
    solves problems with violence supporting member
    Ming Loyalist's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    as a patient of bisio's i can tell you that he's one of the best in the field, and i've been worked on by a lot of people. TCM and TCMA go hand in hand a lot of the time, but i do think that TCM can suffer from some of the same issues as TCMA, and by that i mean when you find someone who is good (teacher or acupuncturist) you can get great results, but they can be hard to find.

    as to TCM being a part of TCMA training, it sure was integral to mine. my sifu is also an acupuncturist (as is his sifu) and so often after a particularly harsh training session i would end up with a bunch of needles stuck in me, and some horrible chinese herbs to boil and drink.

    my judo sensei is also trained in judo bonesetting, but he doesn't work on the students much if at all. i think the connection between bonesetting and judo is getting lost.
    "Face punches are an essential character building part of a martial art. You don't truly love your children unless you allow them to get punched in the face." - chi-conspiricy
    "When I was a little boy, I had a sailor suit, but it didn't mean I was in the Navy." - Mtripp on the subject of a 5 year old karate black belt
    "Without actual qualifications to be a Zen teacher, your instructor is just another roundeye raping Asian culture for a buck." - Errant108
    "Seriously, who gives a **** what you or Errant think? You're Asian males, everyone just ignores you, unless you're in a krotty movie." - new2bjj

  3. #13
    ChenPengFi's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Ming Loyalist View Post
    as a patient of bisio's i can tell you that he's one of the best in the field, and i've been worked on by a lot of people. TCM and TCMA go hand in hand a lot of the time, but i do think that TCM can suffer from some of the same issues as TCMA, and by that i mean when you find someone who is good (teacher or acupuncturist) you can get great results, but they can be hard to find.

    as to TCM being a part of TCMA training, it sure was integral to mine. my sifu is also an acupuncturist (as is his sifu) and so often after a particularly harsh training session i would end up with a bunch of needles stuck in me, and some horrible chinese herbs to boil and drink.

    my judo sensei is also trained in judo bonesetting, but he doesn't work on the students much if at all. i think the connection between bonesetting and judo is getting lost.
    Hahaha on the horrible smelling herbs.
    I totally agree on the TCM/A analogy.

    You're probably aware that Judo Seifuku is a licensed profession and part of the mainstream medical model in Japan.
    I'm thinking that might have something to do with it being less and less a part of the martial art.

  4. #14
    solves problems with violence supporting member
    Ming Loyalist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChenPengFi View Post
    Hahaha on the horrible smelling herbs.
    I totally agree on the TCM/A analogy.
    sifu always said, "oh yeah, boil these herbs and drink them, this is going to taste like ass dipped in dirt. and it's gonna smell bad. really bad. take it for the next 6 weeks"

    You're probably aware that Judo Seifuku is a licensed profession and part of the mainstream medical model in Japan.
    I'm thinking that might have something to do with it being less and less a part of the martial art.
    yeah, the connection is known in japan, but here almost no one knows about it, and it's funny, i'm the only guy in the dojo who goes to see bisio.

    OP - the best thing you can get out of bisio's book is to make a first aid kit of his herbal recipes and use them *immediately* after you get injured when they are most effective, go to a licensed acupuncturist for headache treatments, and for any injuries you get (if you can find a good one.)
    "Face punches are an essential character building part of a martial art. You don't truly love your children unless you allow them to get punched in the face." - chi-conspiricy
    "When I was a little boy, I had a sailor suit, but it didn't mean I was in the Navy." - Mtripp on the subject of a 5 year old karate black belt
    "Without actual qualifications to be a Zen teacher, your instructor is just another roundeye raping Asian culture for a buck." - Errant108
    "Seriously, who gives a **** what you or Errant think? You're Asian males, everyone just ignores you, unless you're in a krotty movie." - new2bjj

  5. #15
    ChenPengFi's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by lordbd View Post
    Tui Na is what I would most like to learn. I had thoughts years ago of being a massage therapist. I'm really enjoying Bisio's book for that reason. Its all about simple sports medicine applications of TCM. Nothing beats a real trained professional though.
    Knowing the translations for the Chinese names of the points can be useful.

  6. #16
    Chapman
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    There are some specific points in our body where as when we press the specific point our general aches are eradicated from the body this is a new technology and was introduced by the chines which is becoming more prominent and famous among the medical field.

  7. #17

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Chapman View Post
    There are some specific points in our body where as when we press the specific point our general aches are eradicated from the body this is a new technology and was introduced by the chines which is becoming more prominent and famous among the medical field.
    I'm not sure I understand your post exactly, but are these things really "new?" Please elaborate.

  8. #18
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    lorbd,
    awesome article to create awareness for the effectiveness of the LI4. just rolled out a new product called aculief. please check us out it will apply pressure to the li4 and you can continue your workout while it works. very interested in discussing with you further. great job pointing out the benefits of the li4!
    Be Well
    Jon
    Aculief

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