Page 2 of 2 First 12

Thread: Neck Exercises

  1. #11
    1point2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    4,238
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by ChenPengFi View Post
    While i am a big advocate of neck strength as a MA attribute, i'm not convinced it is an effective means of reducing risk of TBI.
    edit: TBI = Traumatic Brain Injury
    ...because ____________________________?
    What a disgrace it is for a man to grow old without ever seeing the beauty and strength of which his body is capable. -Xenophon's Socrates

  2. #12
    battlefields's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Australia, Land of Oz
    Posts
    5,271
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Do you know of the exercise that you basically plant your forehead on the floor, then push up on to your feet and use as much of your neck to move your head up and down, and from side to side using your body as resistance? Or has that exercise been declared dangerous and I just don't know it yet?
    GET A RED BELT OR DIE TRYIN'.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Saint Louis, Missouri, United States
    Posts
    325
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by battlefields View Post
    Do you know of the exercise that you basically plant your forehead on the floor, then push up on to your feet and use as much of your neck to move your head up and down, and from side to side using your body as resistance? Or has that exercise been declared dangerous and I just don't know it yet?
    Still done in high school wrestling last time I heard. Another thing we used to do: lie flat on your back, go into a neck bridge, and then do pullovers with a fifty pound sandbag. Not sure if it was safe, but it definitely worked you.

    Sent from my SPH-D710 using Tapatalk 2

  4. #14
    battlefields's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Australia, Land of Oz
    Posts
    5,271
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I'd still do it regardless, my personal experience with it is beneficial. It stretches as well as strengthens, last week when I complained about a crick in my neck, guess what exercise I didn't do before rolling?

    From memory I would do it before hitting the rugby field and being a hooker, a tight head and a loose head prop (at various stages, not at the same time), my neck was regularly put under intense pressure.
    GET A RED BELT OR DIE TRYIN'.

  5. #15
    John222
    Guest
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by John222 View Post
    I want to say that tie a rope with a pull up spring in a gym and try to lift the weight with your neck. Use the small weights in beginning 2-4kg and practice with them until you would be able to lift more weight. Best of luck.
    Cary Personal Training

  6. #16
    The Question's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    5,593
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by ChenPengFi View Post
    While i am a big advocate of neck strength as a MA attribute, i'm not convinced it is an effective means of reducing risk of TBI.


    edit: TBI = Traumatic Brain Injury
    Well me neither, but what it does reduce is the incidence of TNI. Where TNI = Traumatic Neck Injury.
    Quote Originally Posted by Goju - joe
    being a dick with skill is only marginally better than being a dick without skill.

  7. #17
    ChenPengFi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Hawai'i
    Posts
    3,907
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by 1point2 View Post
    ...because ____________________________?
    Sorry, missed this.
    Just unconvinced.
    Sure at the extremes, pencil neck guy is easier to ko than coconut head, but i'm not sure one can substantially reduce one's risk simply by making the neck stronger.
    Often ko shots you don't see coming and neck muscles don't pad the brain.


    edit:
    Conclusions: Our hypothesis that players with greater static neck strength would experience lower resultant head accelerations was not supported. This contradicts the notion that cervical muscle strength mitigates head impact acceleration. Because we evaluated cervical strength isometrically, future studies should consider dynamic (ie, isokinetic) methods in the context of head impact biomechanics.
    http://journals.lww.com/cjsportsmed/..._Hockey.6.aspx

    ...there has been no definitive evidence that neck strengthening plays a role in concussion prevention.
    http://books.google.com/books?hl=en&...GHdpKkss_2LVHg
    Last edited by ChenPengFi; 7/28/2012 1:29pm at .

Page 2 of 2 First 12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Log in

Log in
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO