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  1. DdlR is offline
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    Posted On:
    6/16/2012 12:37am

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     Style: Bartitsu

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Neal S. interviewed about CLANG, and going into some detail re. the historical fencing content: http://www.g4tv.com/videos/59356/nea...nson-on-clang/
  2. Styygens is offline
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    Posted On:
    6/16/2012 9:43am


     Style: BBT/BJJ/CJKD

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    Quote Originally Posted by DdlR View Post
    That's the way John Clements rolls.
    Well, hey, when you're the self-proclaimed "foremost authority" on a subject, you can get away with hyperbole... I mean "rhetoric."

    Still, it's interesting to me how io9 picked up on the potential of articles on swordsmanship. That's really more the point of interest here, and follows on from DdlR's comment that there seems to be growing interest in general.
  3. DerAuslander is offline
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    Valiant Monk of Booze & War

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    Posted On:
    6/18/2012 10:20am

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     Style: BJJ/C-JKD/KAAALIII!!!!!!!

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I like swords.

    BTW, Happy Fathers' Day, Styygens.
  4. captain zorikh is offline

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    Posted On:
    6/18/2012 2:30pm


     Style: bjj, sca, armored combat

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    i think that CLANG is a very worthwhile endeavor and the marketing pitch is a work of entertaining genius! As soon as I have a dollar, I just may have to give it to them!
  5. Styygens is offline
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    Posted On:
    6/18/2012 3:36pm


     Style: BBT/BJJ/CJKD

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Bodhi108 View Post
    I like swords.
    Who doesn't?
  6. misanthropic777 is offline
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    Posted On:
    6/19/2012 12:32am

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     Style: .45 ACP

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Styygens View Post
    Well, hey, when you're the self-proclaimed "foremost authority" on a subject, you can get away with hyperbole... I mean "rhetoric."
    John's a douche.

    Neal Stephenson, OTOH, is a cool guy. I had dinner with him at a WMAW a few years ago, interesting fellow.
  7. DdlR is offline
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    Posted On:
    6/19/2012 10:14am

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     Style: Bartitsu

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    More from Neal S. on the historical fencing content in CLANG, from an interview on Games Industry International - http://www.gamesindustry.biz/article...hensons-racket .

    Q: You're focusing on Western sword arts in CLANG - It's interesting that these martial arts have been relatively neglected, whilst in the East they're culturally venerated. Why do you think that is?

    Neal Stephenson: Well, when we got guns, we forgot how to sword fight. A really odd thing happened in Japan: they got guns and decided not to use them for several hundred years, so they never broke the lineage. So, in the East they just did a better job of curating their old martial arts than we, maybe pragmatic, Westerners. Then they just really nailed it on the image making front. All of these pop culture icons turned up in the '60s and '70s, like Kato in the Green Hornet, Bruce Lee, the Kung Fu television series - innumerable martial arts films from Hong Kong.

    The term martial arts became synonymous with the martial arts of Japan and China, which is fine - they deserve all of the attention and glory they can get for themselves. A different point of view seemed to take hold around the way in which people fought in mediaeval Europe, which was predicated on the idea that a person in a suit of armour is so weighed down that he can't stand up, can't mount his horse, can't move freely, that the weapons are heavy and slow and ponderous, that everyone is nasty and brutish and stupid.

    So that just became the standard kind of shorthand used by film makers whenever they were depicting people in the West. It's a remarkably difficult habit to break.

    Q: From the very little I've learned it seems that full plate wasn't nearly as common as we're lead to believe...

    Neal Stephenson: Even when people did wear full armour, it was much more lightweight and flexible than people realise. They could do shoulder rolls, run. There's plenty of YouTubery around this at the moment. Just within the last few weeks there have been a couple of mediaeval fighting tournaments where people have been going at each other in full armour, one's called Lists on the Lake, in Texas. The swords are far lighter and more mobile than is generally appreciated.

    But as you say, it wasn't all people in full armour - a lot of these arts were intended to be used by people dressed in ordinary street clothes. They presume a much higher degree of lightness and mobility that we see in movies.

    Q: This is clearly a great passion of yours, something very dear to you. Given that so much of the project seems to pivot on accurate simulation, is CLANG also going to appeal to people who just want to smack the hell out of a man in a tin hat?

    Neal Stephenson: It has to. It has to have levels and modes that are just about the straightforward smacking around. That's key to making it work at all. We're sort of following the template that's been laid down already by first person shooters where you always have that. You can go into, say Halo, and set it to easy mode, and it's easy.

    Many people don't want to go beyond that. Many people beyond a certain point say, 'I know, I'd like to make this a little more interesting, a little more challenging.' By changing difficulty settings or advancing to a more challenging level it becomes possible to increase the level of challenge and thereby get drawn deeper into that world. So, that's a tried and true approach to game design that ought to work perfectly well with what we're doing.
  8. DdlR is offline
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    Posted On:
    6/27/2012 9:16pm

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     Style: Bartitsu

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/...g/posts/255582 - a new update including considerable detail on the martial arts and computer animation content of CLANG, with two video clips.
  9. DdlR is offline
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    Posted On:
    6/29/2012 11:49am

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     Style: Bartitsu

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/...g/posts/256481 - much more technical detail, explaining how historical fencing techniques will be designed into the game structure.
  10. Permalost is offline
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    pro nonsense self defense

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    Posted On:
    6/29/2012 1:25pm

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     Style: FMA, dumbek, Indian clubs

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    That's a really interesting interface. I could see it being used in an Asian martial arts game as well. Maybe a Southeast Asian one?
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