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  1. broctonrye is offline

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    Posted On:
    6/04/2012 4:35pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Why Do You Practice?

    The more I listen and observe... the more I notice a sobering reality about martial arts.

    That no matter which style I practice or invest belief in, fundamentally, it seems that to take up a martial art is to live a life of proving myself to one degree or another.

    But a life lived to prove oneself is the life of a coward. After all, the very effort to prove myself is undeniable evidence of my lack of security. Nobody wants to admit this because if we do, we're denying ourselves the throne we dream of sitting on one day.

    Has anyone else noticed this? Is anyone else willing to admit that mostly, their practice is informed by a desire to resemble the mythical Chuck Norris, and so hopefully someday people will talk about me as if I can slam revolving doors?

    I'm not saying that's a bad thing necessarily. We're only offered so many ways to play the game of life and the game of ambition, especially warrior ambition, can be fun.

    But all the fun is sucked right out of it when people don't admit it's a game, and they really start to believe their own bullshit (see: George Dillman). Once that happens, we're on our way to drinking the Kool-Aid.

    I don't want to drink the Kool-Aid guys. :megusta:
  2. Tameshiwhaty? is offline

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    Posted On:
    6/04/2012 4:57pm


     Style: Shotokan

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    never noticed how megusta looks like Dillman.... But I agree all this style vs style is all about insecurity and the need to think you are in the right, much like religion a vs religion b.
  3. lordbd is offline

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    Posted On:
    6/04/2012 5:20pm


     Style: Boxing/Iron Palm

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I don't think every martial arts aficianado has an underlying insecurtity that drives them.

    I think a lot of people are drawn in because of movies and discover that it's a great way to have fun while getting exercise. Other's might just be intrinsically motivated to improve themselves without caring how they measure up to others.

    People who brag about their martial art and put others down might be insecure though.
  4. Permalost is online now
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    pro nonsense self defense

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    Posted On:
    6/04/2012 5:45pm

    supporting member
     Style: FMA, dumbek, Indian clubs

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by broctonrye View Post
    But a life lived to prove oneself is the life of a coward. After all, the very effort to prove myself is undeniable evidence of my lack of security.
    I don't think this is necessarily true. If one's drive is to prove oneself, in any particular area of life, it may be the coward's path to avoid the challenge and rationalize it away. To avoid challenges is the coward's path, and proving oneself can often be a path of many challenges. Stepping into that willingly doesn't automatically make a coward.

    Nobody wants to admit this because if we do, we're denying ourselves the throne we dream of sitting on one day.
    Conan sat upon his throne of skulls but ruled with a troubled brow. But maybe its because the journey, the struggle, had ended, and he learned too late that the destination wasn't the important part.

    Is anyone else willing to admit that mostly, their practice is informed by a desire to resemble the mythical Chuck Norris, and so hopefully someday people will talk about me as if I can slam revolving doors?
    Actually, sometimes a friend/my gf/family etc may "out" me as a martial artist of some note to some random person, and it makes me uncomfortable if either tries to play me up as some deadly guy. I don't train so that people will fear me, because I know that's not much of an asset in this day and age.

    But all the fun is sucked right out of it when people don't admit it's a game, and they really start to believe their own bullshit (see: George Dillman). Once that happens, we're on our way to drinking the Kool-Aid.
    Well, there are plenty of people who teach violence skills for occupational reasons, and it kinda muddies the waters if you suggest that people are only legit if they know they're playing around. My teacher, for example, teaches police baton skills to police officers. I wouldn't speak ill of him, and if I were given that job, I'd take it seriously, not screw around because its fun. So, I think that its worth making the distinction between martial hobbies and real skills to be used.

    I don't want to drink the Kool-Aid guys. :megusta:
    That's a good attitude, just don't get dehydrated while you refuse water you suspect is Kool-Aid.
  5. IMightBeWrong is offline
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    Posted On:
    6/04/2012 6:33pm


     Style: 9mm/Judo/BJJ/MT

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    This is only me and my dumb as hell opinion, but I think it's purely about enjoyment. If I didn't enjoy martial arts for whatever reason, I sure as hell wouldn't be here. If you ask me if it's about self defense, I say hell no. Martial arts are possibly the worst tool for self defense around if you compare them to avoidance, running away, carrying a firearm or some mace, and just plain not being an ass hole. It's all about the fun had training and the feeling of accomplishment when I know I'm getting better. Without that, there'd be nothing to keep me going.
    "Intelligence is nothing more than discussing things with others. Limitless wisdom comes of this." - 山本 常朝
  6. jnp is offline
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    Titanium laced beauty

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    Posted On:
    6/04/2012 6:48pm

    supporting memberforum leaderstaff
     Style: BJJ, wrestling

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by broctonrye View Post
    The more I listen and observe... the more I notice a sobering reality about martial arts.

    That no matter which style I practice or invest belief in, fundamentally, it seems that to take up a martial art is to live a life of proving myself to one degree or another.

    But a life lived to prove oneself is the life of a coward. After all, the very effort to prove myself is undeniable evidence of my lack of security. Nobody wants to admit this because if we do, we're denying ourselves the throne we dream of sitting on one day.

    Has anyone else noticed this? Is anyone else willing to admit that mostly, their practice is informed by a desire to resemble the mythical Chuck Norris, and so hopefully someday people will talk about me as if I can slam revolving doors?

    I'm not saying that's a bad thing necessarily. We're only offered so many ways to play the game of life and the game of ambition, especially warrior ambition, can be fun.

    But all the fun is sucked right out of it when people don't admit it's a game, and they really start to believe their own bullshit (see: George Dillman). Once that happens, we're on our way to drinking the Kool-Aid.

    I don't want to drink the Kool-Aid guys. :megusta:
    Hi, the era before swords and guns called. It wants it's dark ages rationale back.

    In this day of easily concealable lethal weapons, training non-weapon martial arts is a bit of an anachronism. If you're worried about your personal safety, I suggest you look into gun or knife classes. Preferably one that covers the legal ramifications as well as how to use the weapon.

    Besides, your style field says BJJ. You're not really learning but one-third of what you actually need to know to be a well rounded and competent martial artist.

    All that said, most of us who train for years question our reasons for training at some point. I started BJJ at 32. That was eleven years ago. I train for no other reason other than stress relief and personal enjoyment at this point. I train with at least six guys who I can shred on the mat in a sport BJJ setting, but who would destroy me in a MMA style match. I have no illusions about my ability.

    It seems to me that you are over analyzing your motivation. I will give you the same advice I give myself when I begin to over think things, shut the hell up and train.
    Shut the hell up and train.
  7. Ming Loyalist is offline
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    solves problems with violence

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    Posted On:
    6/04/2012 6:54pm

    supporting member
     Style: Judo, Hung Family Boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    i train and compete to obtain a deeper understanding of myself
    "Face punches are an essential character building part of a martial art. You don't truly love your children unless you allow them to get punched in the face." - chi-conspiricy
    "When I was a little boy, I had a sailor suit, but it didn't mean I was in the Navy." - Mtripp on the subject of a 5 year old karate black belt
    "Without actual qualifications to be a Zen teacher, your instructor is just another roundeye raping Asian culture for a buck." - Errant108
    "Seriously, who gives a **** what you or Errant think? You're Asian males, everyone just ignores you, unless you're in a krotty movie." - new2bjj
  8. FHoppy is offline
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    Sardonic or Sarcastic?

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    Posted On:
    6/04/2012 7:14pm

    supporting member
     Style: Filipino Kun Tao, Kali

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Mostly for the same reason I eat well, read well, spend time with my family, and work on my house: I want my life to be a little bit better tomorrow than it is today.

    Also, after this long at one place, most of my friends are my training partners. We have a blast beating on each other.
    Quote Originally Posted by Canuckyokushin
    I would so do Buttsecks.
  9. csharp.negative is offline

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    Posted On:
    6/04/2012 8:18pm


     Style: 1 technique 1000 times

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I've explained my opinion on the practicality of martial arts for self protection, but I won't get into that because last time it totally derailed the thread, so I'll just say that I train because it motivates me to become better at keeping conflicts from becoming physical.
  10. slamdunc is online now
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    Extraordinarily Ordinary

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    Posted On:
    6/04/2012 9:59pm

    supporting member
     Style: TKD, CMA & American Kenpo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by broctonrye View Post
    no matter which style I practice or invest belief in, fundamentally, it seems that to take up a martial art is to live a life of proving myself to one degree or another.
    I started training to compete in point tournaments; those days are long gone, but I wasn't into team sports then. I continue to train not to prove, but to improve myself to some degree. I have gained many friends and colleagues in the martial arts, and my training for an individual sport actually converted me into a team player.

    Quote Originally Posted by broctonrye View Post
    Is anyone else willing to admit that mostly, their practice is informed by a desire to resemble the mythical Chuck Norris, and so hopefully someday people will talk about me as if I can slam revolving doors?
    I admire Chuck Norris for the positive image he projects and the fact that he gives back to the community.

    Quote Originally Posted by broctonrye View Post
    But all the fun is sucked right out of it when people don't admit it's a game, and they really start to believe their own bullshit (see: George Dillman).
    Dillman is a perfect example; you could also add Ashida Kim and Frank Dux to that group. Do you think these guys actually buy into their own bullshit, or is it a means to an end? The martial arts can be a lucrative business, and the little bit of fame (if I dare call it that) that these so-called masters have makes them somewhat in demand. They profit from seminars, selling books, and franchising their theories, systems, etc. Are they delusional to the point that they drink their own Kool-Aid?
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