Page 4 of 4 First 1234
  1. #31
    TheRuss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Not Canada
    Posts
    4,334
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Flexibility and steric interference will limit your stance width and toe angle.

    Nutrition stuff should go in a second thread.
    Quote Originally Posted by Emevas View Post
    Downstreet on the flip-flop, timepants.

  2. #32

    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Burnaby B.C.
    Posts
    3,033
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by TheRuss View Post
    steric interference will limit your stance width and toe angle.
    what? http://www.google.ca/search?q=steric...ient=firefox-a
    http://oxforddictionaries.com/defini...teric?q=steric

  3. #33

    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Cairo, Egypt
    Posts
    642
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I had to Google it too. But I assumed it means the way my body is arranged.

  4. #34
    TheRuss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Not Canada
    Posts
    4,334
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Mister View Post
    I had to Google it too. But I assumed it means the way my body is arranged.
    Correct. Lon Kilgore appropriated the term from chemistry and applied it to anatomy in Anatomy Without A Scalpel, and I think it's perfect.

    Basically, it's when your body parts get in each other's way.
    Quote Originally Posted by Emevas View Post
    Downstreet on the flip-flop, timepants.

  5. #35
    eloneamigo
    Guest
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Put 5lb weights underneath your heals, most olympic weightlifters have platform shoes to replicate this. I lucked out and learned how to squat, c & j, and snatch properly by 2 time gold medalist Tommy Kono.

    I practiced hard for about a year with him and the other guys who do O-lifting, and I am an amateur at best. It takes a lot of practice, I would watch youtube videos of the chinese national team since those those guys have flawless technique.

    Most people don't have a solid racking position (Where the weight is held) which makes the front squat especially uncomfortable and challenging. Make sure your lower back maintains a c shape, and doesn't round, and that you have the right flexibility in your arms to comfortably manage the weight.

    I weighed about 215lbs when I was training and my average front squat for sets of 3 -5 286.6 lbs which took some time to build up to. The are an awesome exercise when you do them right in both quads and hammies. Good luck in your pursuits, if you upload a quick video of you performing a front squat I might be able tell you what is happening. Good luck.

Page 4 of 4 First 1234

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Log in

Log in
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO