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  1. dwkfym is offline
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    Yours truly

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    Posted On:
    7/06/2012 4:06pm

    Business Class Supporting Member
     PDS Rifles Style: Univ. Florida Kickboxing

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    longer and longer each time :)
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  2. Mr. Machette is offline

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    Posted On:
    7/06/2012 4:14pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: FMA, Ego Warrior

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by dwkfym View Post
    longer and longer each time :)
    Got it! Thanks man.
  3. selfcritical is offline

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    Posted On:
    7/06/2012 6:07pm


     Style: Pekiti, ARMA, other stuff

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by jspeedy View Post
    For the most part your MT guy is incorrect. From what i've read (Pavel, RIppertoe,Stronglifts) there are different types of training. There's endurance (high reps) hypertrophy (med reps) and strength (low reps) training all can be done with weights or bodyweight. The last sentence is just a rough out line to illustrate the differences in rep ranges i'm sure someone with more knowledge can come in here all snarky and explain how all rep ranges develop strength or whatever.

    Before I knew much about lifting (I'm still a novice) I stuck to light weights and high reps, I find most weak guys who know little take the same route. Most people just pick up the Men's Health isolation exercise bodybuilding routines. I would think that for an amateur or hobbyist fighter bodyweight routines would be better than split workouts and isolation exercises but I'm sure isolation exercises have their place with an experienced trainer.

    Short answer- limit strength isn't terribly important for striking, so strikers tend to not know much of anything about effective strength training.

    Long answer. Striking tends to be unloaded movement, with a high degree of acceleration, and a very quick relaxation to tension-to relaxation cycle. It's just different in it's power cord than producing a maximal force with high loading. And unless you're already weak(like, for example, every novice trainee ever), improving your maximum strength will not directly improve your rate of force development. Also transfer of training in RFD tends to be more movement-specific.(If i get stronger at deadlifting and benching, I get stronger at everything, but if I get really fast at one movement that doesn't always transfer). So doing a ton of strength work doesn't always carryover to your striking power, gives you more stresses to recover from, etc. That's basically what happens if you try to do the normal SS program unmodified and train boxing 5 days a week.

    Now, if you do a more moderate volume, and rotate assistance work for speed development or muscular endurance, that's a different story.

    Your coach isn't dumb, the tradition of not doing much focused strength work in striking arts exist for a reason- that reason being that it's not a strength sport, and your skill, cardio, and sparring requirements preclude you from doing really serious strength training. That doesn't mean you can't fit barbell work in, in a way that will maintain strength, but you have to be smart about it and not blow yourself up
  4. dwkfym is offline
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    Posted On:
    7/07/2012 6:46pm

    Business Class Supporting Member
     PDS Rifles Style: Univ. Florida Kickboxing

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    At my club we had this one kid was incredibly strong and lifted HEAVY at least once a week. I don't tihnk he was doign steroids so he must have just been genetically gifted at recovering.

    He hit HARD. However, I've been hit by skinny, smaller guys who don't lift who hit just as hard.
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  5. Scrapper is offline
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    Fear and bullets.

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    Posted On:
    7/07/2012 8:46pm

    staff
     Style: MMA

    3
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Sigh.

    Force is force. Any strength program should be geared toward producing more force.

    There are lots of ways to accomplish this. All of them are built around the concept of progressive resistance. If the exercise you are doing is too easy, find a way to make it require more force and thus stimulate an adaptation from your body.

    The easiest way to do this is to add weight to a Barbell. That's why its popular. There is no trick to it. If 200 LBS is easy, do 210 next time.

    This process can be accomplished with bodyweight, but requires more creativity and know how. Furthermore, maximal force output is typically impossible to achieve without external equipment.

    When someone says "core" it makes me wince. The muscles of the trunk are not special, and if your program includes compound lifts, the core should not need special attention. Generally, when someone takes special consideration to work the "core", it is an excuse to skip the brutally difficult stuff and just do 48463 sit ups.

    When you introduce instability, you ate no longer training to produce more force. You are training balance and coordination. This is good, but it is not strength training. I posit that balance and coordination are better trained on the mat and not in the gym, but that is an opinion.

    If you wanto be stronger, lift more. How you accomplish this us up to you.

    Sent from my ADR6400L using Tapatalk 2
    And lo, Kano looked down upon the field and saw the multitudes. Amongst them were the disciples of Uesheba who were greatly vexed at his sayings. And Kano spake: "Do not be concerned with the mote in thy neighbor's eye, when verily thou hast a massive stick in thine ass".

    --Scrolls of Bujutsu: Chapter 5 vs 10-14.
  6. DaidoJukuJoe is offline

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    Posted On:
    7/07/2012 9:11pm


     Style: Daido Juku - Kudo

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Personally, I've done it all. I got the most gains doing high intensity weight workouts (with high reps/no rest) with body weight workouts between sets followed by cardio. I did a few months of that then went back to power lifting and blew my old max in all lifts out of the water. Recently I've gone on to all body weight workouts, using different tools to make my weight unstable while I perform the movements, followed by 1 minute sessions on the heavy bag then finishing up with pull ups/chin ups and using cargo straps to pull my flatted body off the ground. This type of working out has greatly helped me while doing Jiu jitsu.
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