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  1. Prone is offline
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    Posted On:
    4/27/2012 4:57am


     Style: BJJ / Kyokushinkai Karate

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Yes, I am implying exactly that. The warm-up is pure conditioning, strength exercises etc. Very tough and not less demanding than what I experienced in Kyokushin, MT and Kickboxing...

    What about the other BJJ practicioners here, is my school different?
  2. Gezere is offline
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    Posted On:
    4/27/2012 5:46am

    supporting member
     Style: Kakutogi

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by battheo View Post
    Just to clarify, I'm addressing athletic conditioning only here.

    Do you think BJJ requires the same level of fitness as Boxing, Judo, Muay Thai etc?
    Yes it does.
    I do not take BJJ. But it seems to me that it's less of an exertion than, say, boxing.
    You are very wrong on this. BJJ requires a bit more exertion than boxing.

    This opinion, incidentally, is based on observation, second hand reports from friends and sparring partners who train BJJ, and what I've read on this site.

    If I'm mistaken, by all means correct me. But some of the BJJ players I know would have difficulty completing a boxing warm up, let alone a whole session. That's not to say they can't fight (they can) and that some others aren't in great shape. Just that a focus on high level fitness (particularly cardio) is not stressed in the BJJ training methodology in the same way that it is in some other sport arts.
    I am a Boxer, Judoka, train Muay Thai, Wrestler, and do BJJ. Cardio is highly stressed in BJJ. Go watch Arte Suave and some of the other BJJ docus and see how guys train. Better yet go to a class or compete. You will find out quickly how wrong you are.
    ______
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    You can't practice Judo just to win a Judo Match! You practice so that no matter what happens, you can win using Judo!
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  3. Moldy is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/27/2012 5:52am


     Style: MMA

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    It may not appear like it does from the outside, but grappling requires a lot more energy than striking. This is because you have to exert your muscles for longer to move yourself on the ground, or to move a resisting opponent than you would have to for kicking or punching.
  4. Prone is offline
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    Posted On:
    4/27/2012 5:57am


     Style: BJJ / Kyokushinkai Karate

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Glad that Asia answered because then it comes from someone with authority. I was worried I would have to defend my BJJ class because everyone would say: naw, you don't need athletic conditioning for BJJ. After half a year I can actually go through all exercises without feeling like dead next morning (and it helped my new love for Kyokushin, where the conditioning is hard to say the least).
  5. battheo is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/27/2012 6:01am


     Style: Quanfa

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Prone View Post
    Glad that Asia answered because then it comes from someone with authority. I was worried I would have to defend my BJJ class because everyone would say: naw, you don't need athletic conditioning for BJJ. After half a year I can actually go through all exercises without feeling like dead next morning (and it helped my new love for Kyokushin, where the conditioning is hard to say the least).
    Fair enough - I stand corrected on the BJJ / athletic conditioning point.

    OP - disregard the statement in my post about athletic conditioning.
  6. battheo is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/27/2012 6:05am


     Style: Quanfa

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Gezere View Post
    Yes it does.

    You are very wrong on this. BJJ requires a bit more exertion than boxing.



    I am a Boxer, Judoka, train Muay Thai, Wrestler, and do BJJ. Cardio is highly stressed in BJJ. Go watch Arte Suave and some of the other BJJ docus and see how guys train. Better yet go to a class or compete. You will find out quickly how wrong you are.
    I have been toying with the idea of taking up BJJ as I have basically no ground game and three or four of the guys I hang around with go to classes. Time and money have prevented me so far. But maybe I'll take the plunge soon...
  7. 98Bird is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/28/2012 2:28pm


     Style: BJJ, TKD

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Boxing gyms, the real ones where there are pros & amateur fighters training, will usually be the most brutal in terms of getting you sparring the quickest and then up to hard sparring for knockdowns and knockouts fastest.

    MMA gyms in general are pretty tame in comparison. Muay Thai, you only hit pads and some light, constructive sparring in the beginning for months. Maybe some light sparring (30-40% power) later. If you join the fight team, thus wanting to fight, then it's about 70% power for average sparring and up to full sparring (100% for KO's) when prepping for a fight. Knees & elbows are still kept at light only though.

    BJJ, you can spar 80-90% power & intensity all day w/o injuries just as long as you know that once you've got the hold locked in, to lessen the intensity and give your partner time to tap.

    MMA class is more intense right off the bat as it combines both MT & BJJ with more emphasis on fight training. Maybe this is why it's the least popular within most MMA schools. So don't worry, you're not the only guy who's afraid of getting hit in the face or w/e.
  8. 98Bird is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/28/2012 2:46pm


     Style: BJJ, TKD

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Gezere View Post
    Yes it does.

    You are very wrong on this. BJJ requires a bit more exertion than boxing.

    I am a Boxer, Judoka, train Muay Thai, Wrestler, and do BJJ. Cardio is highly stressed in BJJ. Go watch Arte Suave and some of the other BJJ docus and see how guys train. Better yet go to a class or compete. You will find out quickly how wrong you are.
    The exertion is just different from what grapplers do and standup striking do. I'm a blue belt in BJJ but haven't been training in over a year (other than once in a while) because I've been fighting all standup tourneys. I'm in fighting shape most of the time, but when going on the BJJ mat, I get real sore the next day due to not using certain muscles required for grappling in a long time.

    Physical exertion is about the same. Both sides are striving for excellent and winning fights. But in general, if you compare the physical shape of the students with at least 1 year experience in the BJJ class vs. the MT class, you'll see that the MT class is usually leaner.
  9. Sang is offline
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    Posted On:
    4/28/2012 7:31pm


     Style: MMA, Yoga

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Depends on the gym and how geared it is towards competition. Take a competitive boxing gym and a competitive BJJ school and they'll both be brutal with conditioning/fitness.

    In regards to which art causes the least injury i don't get how this is not unanimous, BJJ is so much easier on the body than Muay Thai and Sanda. Boxing is pretty good for training longevity too but i think BJJ edges over it.
    "Boxing is the art of hitting an opponent from the furthest distance away, exposing the least amount of your body while getting into position to punch with maximum leverage and not getting hit."
    Kenny Weldon
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