218358 Bullies, 5365 online  
  • Register
Our Sponsors:

Results 11 to 16 of 16
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Sponsored Links Spacer Image
  1. csharp.negative is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    252

    Posted On:
    4/16/2012 6:32pm


     Style: 1 technique 1000 times

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    The main reason I didn't start martial arts when I was a kid was because my father knew a kid that took martial arts and used it to be a bully to other kids. I would take a hint of salt with this claim, but definitely be SURE that your kids are learning how to be respectful as well as learning how to defend themselves, so you don't have a Karate Kid situation on your hands.
  2. Permalost is online now
    Permalost's Avatar

    pro nonsense self defense

    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    12,368

    Posted On:
    4/16/2012 6:41pm

    supporting member
     Style: FMA, dumbek, Indian clubs

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by wikidbounce View Post
    My own choice for them would be Grappling but they are young and just want to jump around and be Ninjas so I got to keep my options open otherwise they could lose interest quickly. They have years before we need to look more serious at training options.
    Having your kid learn ninjutsu because they want to jump around like ninjas is akin to giving them ice cream for dinner because they effin love ice cream, IMHO.
  3. wikidbounce is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    283

    Posted On:
    4/17/2012 8:24pm


     Style: Sticks & Jits & Fritz

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Yeah my kids don't really do Ninja training it's more Ninja playing, usually involves building a obstacle course out of pillows in the lounge room and jumping around yelling what they think is Japanese words.

    Usually after watching "Unbeatable Banzuke" or "Ninja Warrior" they love those shows but can't read the subtitles yet.
    Last edited by wikidbounce; 4/17/2012 8:25pm at . Reason: i accidently a word
  4. EdgeWalker is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Korea
    Posts
    127

    Posted On:
    4/18/2012 4:09am


     Style: Taekkyon Kudo MMA

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I think the real emphasis when it come to teaching kids shouldn't be "is it going to work on the street?". It should be wheter the instructor knows how to teach kids or not.

    A martial arts lesson for kids should teach them how to control their body. The techniques can come later.
  5. wikidbounce is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    283

    Posted On:
    4/19/2012 7:29pm


     Style: Sticks & Jits & Fritz

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Last night I was watching BTN which is a News program for kids. It's good to be able to introduce them to News as it takes stories from their regular program and presents them in a way that opens discussion with parents/teachers.

    It's good because when my daughter gets really concerned seeing things like Tsunamis, we can talk about it together.

    The first story was about landmines in Sri Lanka, we sat and discussed how we are safe from these dangers here but children in other countries aren't as lucky.

    The second story was about the Dangers of the school Judo program in Japan.

    Here's a transcript from their regular edition, as I couldn't find the BTN version.

    http://www.abc.net.au/am/content/2012/s3477310.htm

    My son (our youngest) was really excited saying "I want to do that, I want to do that now". My daughter who had a better grasp of the News story was quite concerned "I don't want my brother to do that, I don't want him to get hurt."

    It was a difficult discussion afterwards balancing between "It's something you can do / but you you need to wait til your older" and "Martial arts does come with the risk of Injury / The safety of the two of you is something we will make sure of".

    I'm interested in the thoughts from other parents on the Judo story.
  6. wikidbounce is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    283

    Posted On:
    4/19/2012 10:14pm


     Style: Sticks & Jits & Fritz

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Here's the copy pasta from the link in case the story expires.

    ELIZABETH JACKSON: In Japan, there are warnings that children could die as a result of a government decision to make martial arts mandatory for all junior high school students.

    Schools have the option to choose kendo, sumo or judo, with the vast majority picking judo as their compulsory class.

    But critics point to dozens of deaths already in judo classes run by unqualified teachers, and hundreds of other serious injuries, including paralysis.

    But the government says the compulsory classes are designed to improve students' physical condition and their manners, as our North Asia correspondent Mark Willacy reports from Tokyo.

    (sounds of children practising judo)

    MARK WILLACY: Judo means 'the gentle way', but there's nothing gentle going on in the gym of Tokyo's Nerima Middle School.

    (sound of judo throw)

    Like thousands of other Japanese junior high schools, Nerima has chosen judo as its compulsory martial arts subject. A decision that's delighted judo instructor and 7th dan black belt Kenji Takahashi.

    (Kenji Takahashi speaking)

    "Judo is traditional Japanese culture" he tells me. "Children don't fight any more. They don't know how to defend themselves" the black belt says. "Judo also teaches them manners" he adds.

    And along with physical health, manners is the main reason why the Japanese government is making martial arts compulsory.

    It believes sports like judo teach children respect and discipline.

    But there are fears in Japan that making it compulsory could also see a rise in serious injury.

    (Sound of Noriko Takase speaking to Keita)

    Noriko Takase loves talking to her son Keita.

    But he can no longer respond. He lies on a special bed in the family's lounge room, where he requires 24-hour-a-day care.

    (Noriko Takase speaking)

    "Five years ago he was taking part in a Judo Federation promotion" says Noriko Takase. "He did a demonstration by being thrown nine times in a row. Later he didn't feel well. Then he suffered convulsions. And after we reached the hospital he was diagnosed with an acute subdural haematoma" she says.

    The former black belt can no longer communicate.

    (Noriko Takase speaking)

    "I worry about this compulsory martial arts program in schools because many teachers are worried they don't have the skills to teach children properly" Noriko Takase says. "I don't want to think about it, but there's a high probability some kids will be badly injured or killed" she says.

    In the past three decades 114 high school students in Japan have died in judo accidents; nearly 300 have suffered serious injury, including paralysis.

    Instructors like 7th dan black belt, Kenji Takahashi, believe children should only be taught by qualified teachers.

    (Kenji Takahashi speaking)

    "I am a judo expert and I know how to avoid injury" he says. "I've told parents that safety is my number one priority in my classes. I've said to them don't worry."

    (sound of children practising judo)

    Manners and discipline may be important to the Japanese government, but to parents, the priority is keeping their children from a nasty fall - one that could result in death.

    This is Mark Willacy in Tokyo for Saturday AM.
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Powered by vBulletin™© contact@vbulletin.com vBulletin Solutions, Inc. 2011 All rights reserved.