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  1. twan55 is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/04/2012 3:19pm


     

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    And the third and the fourth?
  2. blue-dragon is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/04/2012 7:28pm


     Style: Boxing and Moo Duk Kwan

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Ten years ago I tried TKD, it was horrible for me. All the sensei tried to do was get me stiff as a board, throw puches from the hips, block every attack, and constantly back petal from an opponent. Every instinct from boxing was against this and I had to get out of there. It wans't for me.
  3. Kintanon is offline
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    Yes, I am smarter than you are.

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    Posted On:
    4/04/2012 7:35pm

    supporting memberstaff
     Style: TKD, BJJ

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by kevinlolwut View Post
    I've been taking TKD for a little over a month now, and i see it's looked down upon often in this forum. Why is that?
    Because it stole ten years of my life that could have spent doing Judo instead.
    Do yourself a favor and quit now to train something useful instead.
  4. dRoy is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/04/2012 7:50pm


     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I just remembered that when I learned TKD in a dojo approved by TKD association (I can't remember which; it was probably WTF) and the grandmaster was, if I remember correctly, was 8th dan and had the certification displayed in his office.

    The problem was that either the way my teachers taught me was really boring or I was a really, REALLY, lazy kid (I never had any interest in martial arts until I was 18). Whichever it was, I started to hate going to TKD.

    The absolutely worst part was that it did not help me AT ALL with the issue of getting bullied, even after practicing it for five years and getting a black-red belt. I could not fight them off nor did I have any confidence in myself. It did not help at all that some of the very bullies that made my life hell was going to the same dojo as me and sometimes used to sparrings as an opportunity to beat me up. I started to despair more and more until I finally quitted the dojo altogether.

    I am not discreditting TKD here. I am just saying that I have a very negative impression on it due to my depressing experience. If anyone enjoys it and is benefitted by it, that is very good for you and you should keep practicing it.

    Just don't ever ask me, nor my future children, to take it up.
    Last edited by dRoy; 4/04/2012 7:53pm at .
  5. battlefields is offline
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    Posted On:
    4/04/2012 8:31pm

    forum leader
     Style: BJJ/ MMA/ MT

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by evilstan View Post
    You do realize that striking and grappling are two completely different things right? If you actually do train thai boxing and had mentioned that instead of bjj your statement would have made way more sense. Just saying.
    You missed the point, evilstan. Let my point be iterated by someone with much more experience in both striking and grappling than me:

    Quote Originally Posted by Kintanon View Post
    Because it stole ten years of my life that could have spent doing Judo instead.
    Do yourself a favor and quit now to train something useful instead.
    Firstly, I must update my style field, I am only doing BJJ at the moment, I had the option of training in Thai boxing at my gym, but for financial reasons I couldn't. However, if you review my training history, you will see that Muay Thai is one of the first arts I studied as a teenager. Secondly, I am saying that in my first month of proper grappling instruction I found infinitely more worth than my approximate year of TKD instruction. That's not too hard to understand now, is it?

    If it is and you insist on me making the comparison between Thai boxing and TKD, here is an anecdote from my time with my TKD instructor:

    I used to work in the same complex as my dojang and had a really good relationship with my Kwanjangnim. As I was so close, I was often the first and only person at the dojang, before even the kids classes (it was 40 minutes to go home then 40 minutes to come back, so not worth it). This meant that I had time to use the dojang and its equipment by myself. So I would do my poomsae, but mostly I liked kicking the bags.

    Now, I love Muay Thai and never really let go of the stuff that I had learnt when I did it, I love kicking hard and low and with my shin, with power coming from the hip backed by my significant weight. I love making the bag crumple and that solid thump as I kick it. Absolutely love it. TKD, however, teaches to slap kicks, fast sharp cracks with the fulcrum coming from the knee.

    Now, at the time I was learning TKD for a couple of reasons, the first being that I wanted to learn an "art". I had been a brawling drunk when I was younger and wanted some sort of martial arts discipline which included meditation principles. Second, it was close to my work. Third, TKD is quick and at 120kg I wasn't. So I was there to learn speed. I already had a lot of power. Remember as well, this is all before I found bullshido and the efficacy of grappling.

    So there I am kicking the bag when this 16 year old black belt (lol) comes up to me and tells me I'm doing it all wrong. He explains to me that I should be chambering my kicks from the knee and slapping the bag. I look at him, this weed of a dude, and smile and kick the bag so loud it reverberates around the dojang. He continues telling me how I am doing it wrong.

    Now, Kwanjangnim knew I wasn't going to be a star competitor in TKD and he also knew of my training history. I took him aside and asked him what he thought about my kicking outside of his class, after I had dutifully explained that while in class I was there to learn TKD and defer to his teachings. He said to me, "you kick hard, you kick with power and you have good technique. Don't listen to that guy." Not that I needed his approval, but I was using his dojang.

    So my Kwanjangnim recognised that Muay Thai kicks, for me at least, were better. Anecdote closed.

    The thing is that TKD linked me to HKD and HKD opened up another world to me, a world where techniques of joint locks were included. I didn't see how many of the joint locks could work on a resisting opponent, having been in a few blues in my time, so I went searching for more info, found bullshido and ultimately found grappling.

    Even though the motto of nearly every martial arts school is "drop the ego", the biggest egos I ever came across were those under 30 in black belts in TKD. I stepped in my first BJJ class with an ego the size of Gibraltar (because I had done a few years of striking and played rugby so how hard could it be, right?) and by the end of the lesson, the ego was the size of an atom. I was in a world where my size, my strength and my power meant very little. I knew I had much to learn.

    In TKD, I knew I would need to know all these patterns that I thought were ludicrous for self defence, but that they were part of the art and that's how you got a black belt, by doing the forms, by participating in foot slapping comps and by becoming more flexible. That was how I saw progression through TKDs ranking. The challenge was minimal. In grappling the challenge is evident from the first class and is present every class from then on.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Machette View Post
    Ups to Battlefields for dropping the sage wisdom.

    You are like a Pimp Yoda.
    Quote Originally Posted by Tranquil Suit View Post
    Battlefields... You're more of a man than I am.
    GET A RED BELT OR DIE TRYIN'.
  6. weechey is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/05/2012 1:08am


     Style: TKD BJJ

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    In my BJJ school, I
    1. Regularly roll with my instructor
    2. Regularly roll with my head instructor when he visits

    That's a 4th degree and 6th degree BJJ black belts, right there. When is the last time you EVER saw a TKD master fight with his students? I haven't, and I did TKD for almost 20 years.

    There's something seriously wrong with that.
  7. RWaggs is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/05/2012 4:16pm


     Style: KK

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by weechey View Post
    In my BJJ school, I
    1. Regularly roll with my instructor
    2. Regularly roll with my head instructor when he visits

    That's a 4th degree and 6th degree BJJ black belts, right there. When is the last time you EVER saw a TKD master fight with his students? I haven't, and I did TKD for almost 20 years.

    There's something seriously wrong with that.
    Yep, I had a belt test at Kyokushin this last Saturday. The finale of a proper Kyokushin belt test has multiple rounds of full contact fighting with no rest against fresh opponents. First up for me: my Sensei, a 4th degree BB. About 4 rounds later, he rotated back in, and so on... At least I have first hand experience that my instructor is d3adlier than I.
  8. evilstan is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/05/2012 4:51pm


     Style: Kendo, JJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Battlefields thanks for your perspective and I also need to update my style field since JJJ has been replaced with Judo and BJJ a while ago. I have never trained taekwondo and my striking training is limited to a few boxing and kickboxing classes. I had a kendo instructor who also taught TKD and did not have a single black belt in his kids class (he used a different belt and his school competed often). I even saw some parents leave angry when he didn't give out a yellow belt because he said the kid needed more work. I also know a girl who was a silver medalist in the jr. olympics and her school according to the other people I knew who trained had a reputation for hard contact (and she hit freaking hard even though she was tiny). So maybe my impressions of TKD are skewed.

    Even in your example the actual instructor was the one making sense. Some 16 year old telling you your doing it wrong is like the new blue belt in BJJ that tries to correct everyone because he is young and has a blue belt, that kind of thing happens in BJJ all the time. My point though is that comparing two completely different styles doesn't really make sense. I will never say TKD sucks because I am not qualified to explain to someone why it sucks. If the problem is with the people is it really about TKD? Even your example had a qualified instructor telling you to ignore unqualified advice.

    Apparently you should have quit and yes I have known of TKD guys who want to tell people their Judo sucks only to get smashed, but again this is a personality problem to me and not necessarily a technical one. If someone with an extensive boxing or kickboxing background wants to rip it apart technically I have no problem with that since I have no ability to judge either way and will take their word for it. I just feel it would be ignorant of me to say any striking art sucks because I grapple. I will let the strikers handle the TKD issue, and I think grappling should stay out of it.
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