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  1. Basagulero is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/30/2012 7:47pm


     Style: Lightning Arnis

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    DC Lightning Scientific Arnis - Washington, DC Area

    Hello Everyone,

    I just wanted to announce that my FMA (Filipino Martial Arts) group, DC Lightning Scientific Arnis is training 2:30 pm every Saturday at Warrior Gym in Alexandria, VA just off of 395 at

    5505 Cherokee Avenue
    Alexandria, VA 22312
    www.warriorgymdc.com


    Here is our group's facebook page
    http://www.facebook.com/pages/DC-Lig...ientific-Arnis

    Come and check us out or contact me at angelo.arnis@gmail.com

    Thanks!
  2. jspeedy is online now
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    Posted On:
    3/30/2012 9:01pm


     Style: FMA

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    What can you tell those of us that are unfamiliar with Lightning Scientific Arnis about the system?

    For example, many systems tend to have a specialty or area of focus that may encompass a strategy or philosophy of weapons fighting. For example, Taboada Balintawak (Arnis) has a definite focus on powerful strikes and blocks. The Serrada I've trained focuses on the corto (close for non fma-ers) range but also includes some largo work as well. Other styles emphasize speed, footwork, or the ability to flow.

    I'd love to check out the style but I'm far away so perhaps you can teach me something.
  3. Basagulero is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/30/2012 9:23pm


     Style: Lightning Arnis

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by jspeedy View Post
    What can you tell those of us that are unfamiliar with Lightning Scientific Arnis about the system?

    For example, many systems tend to have a specialty or area of focus that may encompass a strategy or philosophy of weapons fighting. For example, Taboada Balintawak (Arnis) has a definite focus on powerful strikes and blocks. The Serrada I've trained focuses on the corto (close for non fma-ers) range but also includes some largo work as well. Other styles emphasize speed, footwork, or the ability to flow.

    I'd love to check out the style but I'm far away so perhaps you can teach me something.

    http://www.facebook.com/pages/DC-Lig...94309407277235

    Jspeedy:

    Lightning Scientific Arnis is a Tercia Serrada Cadenilla y Espada Y Daga system. The system encompasses Close Quarters, interception, blindsiding, chaining attacks and using Espada Y Daga techniques. Range covered initially is largo because it is easier to develop big smashing motions first and then to shrink the motion as the shorter ranges are taught. We learn De campo (field) techniques first and eventually work our way into de salon (indoor) techniques.

    Though we specialize in Espada y Daga, the weapon proficiencies are: Solo Baston, Doble Baston, Espada y Daga, daga, dulo-dulo, blade work and empty hand.

    Generally we focus on developing body mechanics specific to each weapon though all adhering to the same general principles. A stick is treated like an impact weapon (smashing, explosive core bursts). A knife is treated as a blade (thrusting and slashing). Blade techniques are trained only with a blade simulator present in order to avoid confusion with body mechanics.


    To see more, check out these videos.
    Master Jon Escudero:


    DC Lightning Scientific Arnis:
  4. jspeedy is online now
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    Posted On:
    3/30/2012 10:15pm


     Style: FMA

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Thanks for the explanation and vids. I like the idea of covering largo techniques first. I think it's important for a FMA practitioner to understand how to generate power and to understand how powerful a strike can be. I trained Balintawak first and I suppose the system can be considered mainly medio range; but where I trained a great deal of time was spent on full power strikes or striking through the target. I haven't seen the Serrada guys I train with do any full power striking but I am curious to see how the power generated at a corto range compares to the range I'm used to.

    Just an observation from the videos; how come there is such a large punyo? It appears there is nearly 4-6 inches of punyo used by the guys in some vids. I assume it's used for hooking and manipulating the opponent. In the past i've used a punyo of about 2 fingers or a couple of inches which allowed some limb manipulation but bigger than that would seem like a hinderance.
    Also, I think the perception of the weapon has an importance on how it's used. In Balintawak we were always reminded that the stick was a representation of a blade. However, the way we trained power strikes seemed to be more representative of an impact weapon. The same with some of the disarms.
  5. Basagulero is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/30/2012 11:25pm


     Style: Lightning Arnis

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by jspeedy View Post
    Thanks for the explanation and vids. I like the idea of covering largo techniques first. I think it's important for a FMA practitioner to understand how to generate power and to understand how powerful a strike can be...

    Just an observation from the videos; how come there is such a large punyo? It appears there is nearly 4-6 inches of punyo used by the guys in some vids....
    The whole point of learning the big swings first is to get the practitioner familiar with the maximum range of their weapon as well as to familiarize them with how it feels to generate high powered strike.

    Rule of thumb: if you there is no "whirring" sound, and aren't having to bend your knees + sink your butt closer to the ground to compensate for the momentum, then you are not swinging hard enough. Of course you need to couple it with control, which you develop by learning how far and how hard you can really swing.

    As for the stick butt:
    In the first video, Master Jon is on a stage with limited room to maneuver and he is demonstrating media/corto range. The weapon generally gets smaller at such ranges. If you'll notice in other cases, he holds it at the very end.

    In the second video - I had been working on media/corto range drills for a month before it was shot. The shorter range mindset carried over. Didn't notice I had been doing it - thanks for pointing it out.

    Generally, we hold the stick at the very end for maximum reach and power.
  6. jspeedy is online now
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    Posted On:
    3/30/2012 11:54pm


     Style: FMA

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    that's what the Serrada guys I know do; little to no punyo to maximize the range of the weapon. Thanks for the explanation, I find it hard to get used to no punyo in Serrada but I assume I learn. The sinking your butt closer to the ground to generate power is new to me, I've heard the Serrada guys talk about it but as mentioned haven't seen much of it yet, I'm interested in working it into my skillset.
  7. Basagulero is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/31/2012 12:04am


     Style: Lightning Arnis

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    You can facilitate this by doing a lot of squats and lunges... and all kinds of weird medicine ball workouts that make you cuss as you're doing them.

    Good fun.
  8. jspeedy is online now
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    Posted On:
    3/31/2012 12:48am


     Style: FMA

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I love squats! Just not sure how to work the motion into my power strikes with the stick. Right now I compare the power strikes I do to a boxers punch; the power comes from hip movement via the legs. From what I can tell the height of the hips stays relatively level but their is loading from the legs and subsequent hit rotation. In Serrada the stance is relatively square and the strikes appear to use less hip and body chambering. Power comes from the strikes seems to come from dropping the center of gravity. I still have yet to learn how to use this technique efficiently. Does Lightning Scientific Arnis use the weight dropping technique to generate power? Or does it use the hip rotating/body chamber technique I'm familiar with? Or perhaps a combination of the two?
  9. Basagulero is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/31/2012 6:27am


     Style: Lightning Arnis

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Both.

    It's all dependent on the intent of the strike but it'll always be a combination of both.

    I can't really give you a thorough enough explanation online but if you're ever in the DC area I'd be happy to show you some things.
  10. RynoGreene is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/04/2012 11:38am


     Style: FMA/SAMBO

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Hi guys, I'm with the LESKAS/LSAI Seattle group, and I'll echo what has already been mentioned. Power comes first and foremost. The mechanics of power generation are a bit difficult difficult to describe, but to summarize it in simple terms, I'd say it's a combination of hip/core rotation, aggressive chambering (elbow up!), and weight shifting. Sinking your weight will help you in your stability and consequently power, particularly when swinging a heavier weapon. You simply can't have a narrow stance and really crush someone with a shot from a heavier weapon.

    Although the angles are totally different, I like to look at baseball power hitters to see principles of power generation. A batter will step toward the ball, pushing off on their back foot, sinking their weight, and opening their hips to allow good follow through. Their elbows will be high in an aggressive chamber. There is a decisive twist at the core. The batter makes penetration, and continues to follow through. A wide stance ensures stability.



    Once again, the angles are a bit different, with a ball player facing more sideways, and trying to hit the ball straight or up a bit rather than we would as stickfighters with say an angle number one. Yet the sinking of weight, the aggressive chamber, twist, and sinking of weight are similar. This analogy doesn't perfectly summarize our mechanics, but there are a lot of commonalities.

    In Lightning, we'll go for the big shot at long, or try to move in to a medium/close range and still attempt to land power shots. We do this by aggressive checking of our opponent to make space fore bigger hits, rather than abbreviating our power. Swings do get a bit shorter, but they are still more committed than what I've seen from most other systems. If we're jammed up, we'll simply check to make space, lean away or to the side to gain a bit of additional range, and still try to wallop them.

    My slant on things might be slightly different than some other LSAI fighters, as my instructor, Maestro Ybanez really emphasized this with us. "Wow, you Americans are so big! You guys have to hit hard!" Power first. Then tighten transitions to achieve speed with the power.
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