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  1. #21
    IMightBeWrong's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Devil View Post
    Yeah, that was probably an untrue statement on my part.

    Cut me some slack. It's Monday.
    Slack granted. Don't worry. I've heard people tout the idea that caliber affects accuracy a ton of times in the past, it's not like you pulled it out of your ass. Just a prominent myth.

  2. #22

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Alright, here you go.

    Here is my 10 round group at 10yds with my .22 Sig Sauer Mosquito:



    Here is my 7 round group with my Springfield Champion .45ACP at 10yds:




    ...This was my first run through after 100rnds through the .22 and the 2 low are my overcompensation for the change in recoil when I switched to the .45.

  3. #23
    His heart was visible, and the dismal sack that maketh excrement of what is eaten. supporting member
    Devil's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Just get more comfortable with the Sig. The trigger or sights or something are a little different than the 1911. It's probably something a more experienced shooter would recognize and overcome pretty quickly. There's nothing wrong with the gun. Just get some more range time and you'll be good.

    Edit: Just saw your comments about the two low shots with the .45 group. To me, that says more than anything else about your shooting. There should be no "overcompensation" for the change in recoil. That's your problem, right there. You're anticipating recoil and jerking.

    Firm grip. Slow steady trigger pull. The exact instant the pistol fires should be a bit of a surprise.
    Last edited by Devil; 3/13/2012 7:58pm at .

  4. #24
    submessenger's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    GJ, are you left-handed?

    edit: nevermind, I see you posted right as your main grip, however I still concur with Devil's analysis, above - surprise trigger break is the key.

  5. #25

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Devil View Post
    The exact instant the pistol fires should be a bit of a surprise.
    I know you are right...but that is just something I have to "get used to". Although, I don't know how you "get used to" or "comfortable with" SURPRISE.

  6. #26

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by GoldenJonas View Post
    I know you are right...but that is just something I have to "get used to". Although, I don't know how you "get used to" or "comfortable with" SURPRISE.
    My suggestions:

    (1) dry fire drills - squeeze the trigger as slowly as possible to learn where the break is. As you squeeze the trigger, visualize it as the sharp end of a tack, if you squeeze too hard or too fast, you'll break your skin. Also, if you can, balance an empty casing on your front sight while you do this. If the casing falls off, you didn't do it right.
    (2) quit using the .45 for a while, concentrate on the .22 Again, no recoil, no anticipation. Once you can shoot tight groups with the .22, it should be easy to move over to the .45

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnKenner View Post
    Also, if you can, balance an empty casing on your front sight while you do this. If the casing falls off, you didn't do it right.
    That's a great idea. Never thought of that. Thanks.

    What is the real danger, if any, of actually damaging the firing pin by dry-fire drills? I have heard the whole spectrum of opinions from various people. From,

    "Dry fire drills without snap caps will DESTROY YOUR GUN!!!"

    to

    "Snap Caps? pfffft....Dry Firing is GOOD FOR THE GUN!!!"

  8. #28
    submessenger's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by GoldenJonas View Post
    That's a great idea. Never thought of that. Thanks.

    What is the real danger, if any, of actually damaging the firing pin by dry-fire drills? I have heard the whole spectrum of opinions from various people. From,

    "Dry fire drills without snap caps will DESTROY YOUR GUN!!!"

    to

    "Snap Caps? pfffft....Dry Firing is GOOD FOR THE GUN!!!"
    This depends on the gun, largely. The wear of internal parts by operating the gun not as designed is the concern. It should always be safe to use snap caps, but without them, you should check with your owner's manual and online forums for your specific model.

  9. #29

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    With your 1911, I would absolutely recommend snap caps. The operator is a fine pistol, no reason to even risk damaging it.

    Again, my 2c. I have only rarely dry fired my weapon sans snap caps.

  10. #30
    His heart was visible, and the dismal sack that maketh excrement of what is eaten. supporting member
    Devil's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    It's perfectly fine to dry fire a 1911 without snap caps. In fact, if you look at a Kimber manual (or at least ones I've seen in the past) it will tell you to pull the trigger during assembly and disassembly.

    You're dealing with a hardened steel firing pin. You're not going to hurt it. If you happen to somehow, a new one is 8 bucks from Brownells. If you're feeling like splurging, get a new spring too and make it an even 10 bucks.

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