228356 Bullies, 4503 online  
  • Register
Our Sponsors:

Results 91 to 100 of 110
Page 10 of 11 FirstFirst ... 678910 11 LastLast
Sponsored Links Spacer Image
  1. Nickosaurus is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    U.K
    Posts
    116

    Posted On:
    6/18/2013 8:53am


     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Goju - Joe View Post
    The question is it better to be good at one particular range or OK at a few?
    I suppose it depends on how good Ok is, I stared out in JJJ and it was a good introduction because you did get to see a bit of everything and I wouldn't have found Judo without it

    At the same time I couldn't have fought my way out of a paper bag when I left. I knew theoretically how to do it but didn't have the real practical skills of any range
  2. OwlMatt is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Milwaukee, WI
    Posts
    890

    Posted On:
    6/18/2013 9:02am


     Style: aikido

    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by CrackFox View Post
    "Tradiditional" jujutsu *is* mostly derived from judo. There used to be this thing (well really a family of things) called jujutsu. Judo was derived from jujutsu and became popular. The old styles of jujutsu became less popular and very difficult to find. Some guys decided to recreate the old styles, or at least what they imagined the old styles were like, and came up with the traditional jujutsu styles you find now.
    I came in here to say something along these lines. Most of what is called "jujutsu" today comes from traditions that are younger than judo and have a lot of judo in them (e.g. Danzan-ryu). Authentic traditional (read: predating the Meiji Restoration) jujutsu is extremely hard to find; I would go so far as to say I've never seen a jujutsu club with believable koryu lineage.
    Last edited by OwlMatt; 6/18/2013 9:05am at .
  3. erezb is offline

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,289

    Posted On:
    6/18/2013 9:06am


     Style: Boxing,Kickboxing K1

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    it should be practiced 5-7 times a week basically full time to be affective. For you to be good in striking, grappling and weapons you need to dedicate yourself to it like those old samories did. If not, if you are a hobbyist, than its better to become good enough (trained reflexes) in something that works even if it isn't complete.
  4. JohnKenner is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Saint Louis, Missouri, United States
    Posts
    325

    Posted On:
    6/18/2013 9:20am


     Style: Boxing, Judo, Kenpo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by CrackFox View Post
    "Tradiditional" jujutsu *is* mostly derived from judo. There used to be this thing (well really a family of things) called jujutsu. Judo was derived from jujutsu and became popular. The old styles of jujutsu became less popular and very difficult to find. Some guys decided to recreate the old styles, or at least what they imagined the old styles were like, and came up with the traditional jujutsu styles you find now.
    Quote Originally Posted by OwlMatt View Post
    I came in here to say something along these lines. Most of what is called "jujutsu" today comes from traditions that are younger than judo and have a lot of judo in them (e.g. Danzan-ryu). Authentic traditional (read: predating the Meiji Restoration) jujutsu is extremely hard to find; I would go so far as to say I've never seen a jujutsu club with believable koryu lineage.
    And you two win at bullshido for being bigger pedants than me.

    You are quite right, I should have explicitly said Judo came out of Koryu JJ.
  5. Vieux Normand is offline

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    4,271

    Posted On:
    6/18/2013 1:49pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: 血鷲

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Goju - Joe View Post
    The question: is it better to be good at one particular range or OK at a few?
    The answer: it depends on your adversary.

    That question can be asked all the way up to the professional-fighter level (What's better--MMA or boxing?) but the answer will still depend on adversary and ruleset.



    @Erzb: "...old samories..."?

    Samories?

    Really?
  6. Masahiko is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    28

    Posted On:
    6/19/2013 4:30pm


     Style: Jujitsu, Karate

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I think JJJ deservers more attention but at the same time, it's pretty cool that's it's a bit underground and raw. I imagine with all its popularity, BJJ has had to field some compromises? (I don't know what these might be?).

    Piggybacking on what Rene "Zendokan" Gysenbergs gave in explicit detail, I understand that the -jitsu "schools" eventually became reborn as the -do "lifestyles" with added actualisation and philosophy. I haven't seen that JJJ has much in the way of philosophies more than what you would read in books like the Hagakure, which roughly amounts to: "Be ready to die, at every moment, then you will defeat any opponent" - and stuff like that.
  7. Goju - Joe is offline
    Goju - Joe's Avatar

    I am a Ninja bitches!! Deal with it

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    7,856

    Posted On:
    6/19/2013 5:17pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Improv comedy

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Vieux Normand View Post
    The answer: it depends on your adversary.

    That question can be asked all the way up to the professional-fighter level (What's better--MMA or boxing?) but the answer will still depend on adversary and ruleset.



    @Erzb: "...old samories..."?

    Samories?

    Really?
    It depends to a certain degree but I felt after awhile that if for example I got a BB in TJJ with a range of skill in striking throwing and subs a Judo or BJJ BB or brown belt or purple, would be able to beat me even with in the rule set of allowing strikes and what not just by being that much better at one area than others.

    I still think there are many useful self defense things from TJJ that BJJ ignores but over all I know believe it\s better to get good in one area
  8. BJMills is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    457

    Posted On:
    6/19/2013 5:54pm


     Style: Muay Thai/Wrestling

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Masahiko View Post
    I think JJJ deservers more attention but at the same time, it's pretty cool that's it's a bit underground and raw. I imagine with all its popularity, BJJ has had to field some compromises? (I don't know what these might be?).

    Piggybacking on what Rene "Zendokan" Gysenbergs gave in explicit detail, I understand that the -jitsu "schools" eventually became reborn as the -do "lifestyles" with added actualisation and philosophy. I haven't seen that JJJ has much in the way of philosophies more than what you would read in books like the Hagakure, which roughly amounts to: "Be ready to die, at every moment, then you will defeat any opponent" - and stuff like that.
    What the hell is 'underground' and 'raw' about JJJ?
  9. Masahiko is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    28

    Posted On:
    6/20/2013 2:32am


     Style: Jujitsu, Karate

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by BJMills View Post
    What the hell is 'underground' and 'raw' about JJJ?
    It's just my perspective but underground in the way (here in the UK) where, when I say I do jujitsu, I get one of two responses:
    - "oh, that's the Brazilian one, right?"
    - "is that a style of karate, like shotokan?"

    Yes, we could see these as ignorant responses but in truth - people just have never heard of JJJ, hence being unknown or underground.

    After doing karate for some years, and then coming to JJJ - the techniques stood out as raw to me. Maybe there's a better word than this but I'll share an example that comes to mind: in a clinch with your opponent, doing a takedown then submission, where I might start with a rear leg reap (osoto gari). My opponent is strong and well-balanced, I have to have a really good kuzhushi to throw him; so I might add a strong thumb to the side of the neck while holding the lapel or release the top grip and drive two fingers into the soft flesh at the bottom of the throat - both which unbalance the opponent.

    Now with the opponent on the ground, I'll drop all my weight on his short ribs through my knee, or more probably, execute a stomp (fumikomi) to his temple. Then while transitioning to a seated arm bar, he might give resistance, so I drop the back of my knee or calf of the opponent's mouth to distract and reduce available air. Now at the end in full armbar, I might invert the hand (palm down), as we're told this has a chance to tear more tendons/cartilage than the standard palm up.

    Does anyone else train with these tweaked techniques? This is only a flavour of a session and next we might practise shihonage in a really well-formed and elegant way (influence from aikido and judo), just to balance out the raw stuff. Thoughts?
  10. BJMills is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    457

    Posted On:
    6/20/2013 10:21am


     Style: Muay Thai/Wrestling

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Goju - Joe View Post
    It depends to a certain degree but I felt after awhile that if for example I got a BB in TJJ with a range of skill in striking throwing and subs a Judo or BJJ BB or brown belt or purple, would be able to beat me even with in the rule set of allowing strikes and what not just by being that much better at one area than others.

    I still think there are many useful self defense things from TJJ that BJJ ignores but over all I know believe it\s better to get good in one area
    Quote Originally Posted by Masahiko View Post
    It's just my perspective but underground in the way (here in the UK) where, when I say I do jujitsu, I get one of two responses:
    - "oh, that's the Brazilian one, right?"
    - "is that a style of karate, like shotokan?"

    Yes, we could see these as ignorant responses but in truth - people just have never heard of JJJ, hence being unknown or underground.

    After doing karate for some years, and then coming to JJJ - the techniques stood out as raw to me. Maybe there's a better word than this but I'll share an example that comes to mind: in a clinch with your opponent, doing a takedown then submission, where I might start with a rear leg reap (osoto gari). My opponent is strong and well-balanced, I have to have a really good kuzhushi to throw him; so I might add a strong thumb to the side of the neck while holding the lapel or release the top grip and drive two fingers into the soft flesh at the bottom of the throat - both which unbalance the opponent.

    Now with the opponent on the ground, I'll drop all my weight on his short ribs through my knee, or more probably, execute a stomp (fumikomi) to his temple. Then while transitioning to a seated arm bar, he might give resistance, so I drop the back of my knee or calf of the opponent's mouth to distract and reduce available air. Now at the end in full armbar, I might invert the hand (palm down), as we're told this has a chance to tear more tendons/cartilage than the standard palm up.

    Does anyone else train with these tweaked techniques? This is only a flavour of a session and next we might practise shihonage in a really well-formed and elegant way (influence from aikido and judo), just to balance out the raw stuff. Thoughts?

    The thumb in the neck and other little tricks are surprisingly ineffective against a fully resisting opponent.

    Does your jujutsu class do any kind of sparring or randori?
Page 10 of 11 FirstFirst ... 678910 11 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Powered by vBulletin™© contact@vbulletin.com vBulletin Solutions, Inc. 2011 All rights reserved.