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  1. Auszi is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/11/2012 8:40pm


     Style: BJJ Beginner

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Learn Ukemi from Aikido?

    I have been having real problems learning Ukemi. There are a couple of factors that are contributing to this.

    One, I can only make it to Judo very rarely. Two, I have had problems in my elbows that seemed to be exacerbated by doing any kind of stand up and lastly since I cracked a rib being thrown by a shitty Sambo instructor I have become gun shy about being thrown at all.

    My elbows are finally coming good and I really want to address this issue. In doing a bit of reading and talking to a few people, I have heard mention that specifically learning Ukemi in Aikido has a made them really relaxed about falling and being thrown. So I am looking at the merits of learning Ukemi in Aikido and then switching to Judo later.

    I am assuming the Aikido environment will be more relaxed than at Judo.

    When I say I don't like being thrown, I really don't like being thrown and am constantly worried that I will pick up an injury that will stop me from training even BJJ. I know it is psychological but that is why I am looking at any way I can possibly get around this issue.
  2. Petter is offline

    12th level logic wielder

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    Posted On:
    3/11/2012 9:48pm


     Style: BJJ, judo, rapier

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    You could always go to judo, talk to the instructor, and explain that (1) you have some hang-ups about ukemi (I doubt you’re the first!), and (2) you have some injuries that make you not want to do randori (or take hard falls). If the instructors are decent people and willing to work with you, you may be able to learn some judo at the same time as learning actual judo ukemi for actual judo throws from the people who know it best.

    No specific comments on the aikido idea, because I’ve never done aikido and have no idea what their ukemi practice usually looks like.
    [ petterhaggholm.net | blog | essays ]
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  3. Auszi is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/11/2012 10:02pm


     Style: BJJ Beginner

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Last lesson at Judo, I spent the entire time just doing breakfalls and tied up another judoka who had to stand there and watch me practice.

    Because I cant commit the time at the moment to consistently go to Judo, my thoughts are it would be good to work at the issue in a an environment where there is less pressure to develop as quickly.

    I feel like a kid, in an adults class at the moment. And since its more about being comfortable with falling rather than within Judo specifically, the warm fuzzy environment of Aikido might be good to get me started.
  4. Mister is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/12/2012 4:37am


     Style: Injured

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I'm everyone's favourite Uke in my Judo club because I'm always relaxed when thrown and I go with the flow pretty easy when instructors are demonstrating throwing techniques or when we're practicing Nagekomi or throws.

    I'd like to think that had to do with my Aikido training, from my experience you get to practice Ukemi a lot more in an Aikido class than in a Judo class, and in Aikido you can start with soft falls if you're not confident in your Ukemi and move on then, not so much in Judo.

    But maybe you shouldn't start Aikido ONLY for Ukemi...
  5. Ignorami is offline
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    Posted On:
    3/12/2012 8:21am


     Style: Aikido / FMA / Krotty

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I'd say the two main things going for it are 'the warm fuzzy atmosphere', and the emphasis on relaxing into receiving the technique.

    In addition to that, by way of progression, there are a few techniques in Aikido which (however unlikely in the wild) are nothing short of fucking horrifying to be on the end of in class.
    Willfully being thrown from a pre arranged technique that could seriously handicap you, might be a good middle ground to being thrown against your will.

    I'd be careful choosing your aikido school for that though. Aikikai in particular is more about graceful rolling than safe falling. Not that its bad, but it may not be so transferrable to tight throws in judo.

    Is there any Tomiki Aikido around you? Their breakfalls will be more focussed on getting thrown than throwing yourself. Also, their randori would be a good place to get used to being thrown without correography.
    Last edited by Ignorami; 3/12/2012 8:26am at .


    When life gives you lemons... BLOOD FOR THE BLOOD GOD!!

    "what's the best thing about aikido then?"
    "To be defeated by your enemies, to be driven by them from the field of battle, and to hear the lamentations of your women." ermghoti
  6. Permalost is online now
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    pro nonsense self defense

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    Posted On:
    3/12/2012 10:57am

    supporting member
     Style: FMA, dumbek, Indian clubs

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    It seems that a lot of aikido ukemi is geared towards rolling out of a wrist-based throttling. Rolling is a great skill, and has saved me many times in real life (but not fighting related), but its a skill that works when you're falling with lateral momentum. A judo throw may not have a lateral momentum component to it- you will be falling straight down, and you can't roll to shed the impact of that- you can breathe out and make yourself expansive so that the largest possible area hits the tatami, but that's a much different skill than a roll.
  7. DCS is offline
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    Posted On:
    3/12/2012 11:43am

    Join us... or die
     Style: 柔道

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Aikido ukemi does not translate well into Judo, however it can teach you to be relaxed and lose your fear to go airborne and this is useful for Judo.
  8. PointyShinyBurn is offline
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    Gnarly King of Half-Guard

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    Posted On:
    3/12/2012 12:37pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Aikido will generally teach you to bend your legs underneath you as you roll so that you can easily stand back up/look cool. This is a fairly terrible idea if someone throws you downwards rather than projecting you laterally.

    Observe the difference:

  9. Auszi is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/12/2012 11:41pm


     Style: BJJ Beginner

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by DCS View Post
    Aikido ukemi does not translate well into Judo, however it can teach you to be relaxed and lose your fear to go airborne and this is useful for Judo.
    This is what I am going for, losing the fear. It will only be an intermediary arrangement, until I have time to go to Judo more regularly.
  10. Mister is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/13/2012 4:04am


     Style: Injured

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by PointyShinyBurn View Post
    Aikido will generally teach you to bend your legs underneath you as you roll so that you can easily stand back up/look cool. This is a fairly terrible idea if someone throws you downwards rather than projecting you laterally.
    I think Ukemi is the same everywhere, there are some falls in Aikido where you don't bend your legs underneath.





    It comes down to the direction of the throw and how it is applied, I was taught to never bend my legs if I'm projected downwards in my Aikido training.

    Only the static formal form of training Ukemi is different, but when it comes down to performing Ukemi in a more dynamic setting it is pretty much all the same in my opinion and experience.
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