218358 Bullies, 5351 online  
  • Register
Our Sponsors:

Results 1 to 10 of 55
Page 1 of 6 1 2345 ... LastLast
Sponsored Links Spacer Image
  1. Pineapple is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    15

    Posted On:
    3/02/2012 2:37am


     Style: MMA

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Peter Morton Academy Judo Jujitsu Karate

    Peter Morton Academy Judo Jujitsu Karate
    (Canberra, Australia)
    Out of every martial art club I have trained at (about 11) this one I have enjoyed the most and put the most effort in. I started about 2 and a half years ago, currently hold a blue belt, going for brown in about 2 months times. On to the review:

    The club is a mixture of Judo Jujitsu Karate. I believe boxing should be in the name, yet people may get confused (Black belt in boxing??). First question several peopel think of, is do you learn everything from all 3 arts. I believe so, the only thing missing would be all the kata Karate holds. I know for a fact you learn all the judo techniques required for a black belt in Judo. Even so, it takes a minimum of about 6 years to gain a black belt, sometimes more. There is ALOT to learn.

    Its not a traditional style club, its style is quite unique. 95% of techniques have to be done with a partner, otherwise you cant really grade, yet you make friends in the club or you partner with a black belt. The techniques are usually from a punch, so your partner punches you, you block it and do a technique (throw them over you for example). Some are ridiculously lame, like shaking someones hand and throwing them to the ground. The idea is to learn variety and prepare yourself for a wide range of attacks. They are fun to learn.


    Aliveness: 8
    When you reach blue belt, the intensity goes up extremely. Boxing is practiced alot from green belt onwards, and basically have to prove that you are able to get knocked around by a more senior belt, in other words they punch the crap out of you. Everyone says the black belt course is painful, I believe them. We use safety gear, otherwise there woudl be too many injuries.

    Equipment: 6
    Most gear we use is worn alot, yet we have a huge variety of gloves and kick pads, I believe most branches do too. Even so, most people bring their own stuff, like gloves and head gear, not many people in our club dont own a pair of boxing gloves.

    Gym Size: 7
    It doesnt need to be any bigger really. Even when our class is packed everyone has enough room to do what they need to. Average class is about 15 people, a large class would be about 30. People come and go too often for size to be an issue.

    Instructor/Student Ratio: 7.5
    It was hard to choose between 7 and 8. Most brown belts I know, know almost as much as a black belt. Brown/Blue belts tend to help teach the class techniques with black belts watching. This is mainly to improve confidence and it works. First time i stood in front of a class, to take them through punches, I was nervous as hell. Usually there are black belts walking around while a brown belt leads others through techniques, I've had times when 3 black belts are teaching me one technique.

    Atmosphere: 9
    I love it. I know everyone there really well and I enjoy making friends with new comers and showing them how much they can improve in just a few lessons. Reason why I didnt say 10, sometimes we get about 8 new white belts, I feel they might feel a little left out at times, although its rare I see someone who is sad or angry, so rare I've seen this once at a seminar with 300 people.

    Striking Instruction: 7?
    We learn all the strikes at white belt, you are expected to improve as you grade. If you ask a white belt they would probably say 4, if you ask a brown belt they would probably say 9. Everything adds up overtime, I don't know many black belts that couldnt knock me to the ground with a kick. The techniques are self defence tested, the strikes are held back to a limit to not injure the partner, yet they are expected to look strong and make contact (Might sound lame, would you punch your partner in the face or break his collar bones).

    Grappling Instruction: 8
    Theres alot of grappling, most people learn the techniques by grappling. I've been through countless drills and have improved ALOT. I can beat people twice my size and I can be beaten by people twice my size. The fact that I can make a person alot bigger than me tapout is a huge confidence booster. Although this is more personal, I feel the club does well on grappling, sometimes I feel we do too much.

    Weapons: 2
    I've heard we learn defence against knives in the black belt course, yet thats it. We dont learn how to use weapons, we are told to avoid someone with one.

    Hopefulyl my review has turned some heads. The club doesnt really advertise and relies on word of mouth. Hoping some people in Australia read this and attend a session, enjoy!
  2. AcousticCafe is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    North-Eastern US
    Posts
    16

    Posted On:
    3/02/2012 6:44pm


     Style: Taekwondo (WTF)

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    How well do you guys do in competitions?
  3. Pineapple is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    15

    Posted On:
    3/02/2012 7:23pm


     Style: MMA

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    We dont compete in competitions as a club. Mainly due to the club being very self defence based. I'd love to go to comps again though, I'm not sure if I can go to Judo competitions under my clubs name or not, due to a few little things.

    One being our belt system, Blue belt in Judo is quite rare surprisingly since people only train for competition, at Peter Morton we train focused on our grading and getting techniques perfect. So if I go to a Judo tournament, I'm going to be up against the most senior guys, which isn't a bad thing, my belt won't relate to theirs. They will know at least 24 throws, I know about 12 - 16, (Most throws are learnt in the black belt course).

    Also Judo clubs have a point system, more tournements you go to, more points you get, I don't think our club has any relation.

    Like I said, our school is very self defence based, if we train for tournaments it won't be the same, we crave knowledge and new ideas.
  4. RurikGreenwulf is offline

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    ROU
    Posts
    1,245

    Posted On:
    3/02/2012 7:49pm


     Style: Humbleness

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I think you should lower the instructor ranking teaching after 2 years and something isnt that great, under which rules do you sparr and how often?
  5. Wing-Kwan-Fu is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    163

    Posted On:
    3/02/2012 8:00pm


     Style: Standup, Ground-fighting

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    You said you do a lot of hard boxing sparring, which sounds great. What proportion of students are at this level? How often do you roll/randori hard?

    People are going to maybe be unhappy about the stance on competition-you talk about trying to perfect a lot of strikes and throws, but if you showed us competition results (or even sparring footage) we could know what "perfect" means at your gym. Hate to harp on this, but you talk about craving knowledge...if I spent my time learning "12 throws", I would also want to know how good I was at throwing people. "New ideas" are worthless unless you can find out how good they are. Also I find the false dichotomy between training for technical perfection and for competition a little insulting...the former is a component of the latter.
  6. Petter is offline

    12th level logic wielder

    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    1,964

    Posted On:
    3/02/2012 8:14pm


     Style: BJJ, judo, rapier

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    If you don’t compete, then how on Earth do you figure that you rate an 8 in grappling? (Note that the guidelines speak of “proven success”.) The striking score of 7 also sounds questionable, if you have no competitive success to show for it.
    [ petterhaggholm.net | blog | essays ]
    [ self defence: general thoughts | bjj: “don’t go to the ground”? ]
    “The plural of anecdote is anecdotes, not data.”
  7. Pineapple is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    15

    Posted On:
    3/02/2012 10:58pm


     Style: MMA

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    To re-explain how instructors work. When you gain a blackbelt you are expected to be able to instruct, it doesnt just come naturally assoon as yo ugain a black belt. So Brown belts mainly are often told to instructto get used to it. 95% of the time ablack belt is there helping instruct if there are any faults or things thebrown belt may have left out. Everyone knows the drills that are instructed,just having someone yelling out numbers and explaining techniques varies fromperson to person. Almost every lesson I spend 50% of my time with a black beltgoing through techniques, the other 50% is either fitnes in a group or workingwith someone of the same belt going through our techniques again and again.

    ALL of our techniques are practiced on a partner, I think I mentioned it, notsure why you guys think we don’t. We go over the techniques on varieties oflevels. The hardest is usally 2 man attack where 2 people attack us one on oneand we have to use the techniques we have practiced on a higher level. The higher your belt the harder it is.

    Perfection is a tricky topic, I guess i shoudl have used another word. Reasonwe don’t do competition is because there wouldn’t be much time to practicetechniques for competition. I’ve been to a judo club and msot of the time welearnt tricks for competition, in Peter Morton Academy we learn tricks for selfdefence, things illegal in competition.

    I don’t have any footage which is a shame, I’d like to film my grading butthats a while away. Hard boxing sparring is regular and grappling is also, yetwe don’t mix up the two, no real reason why. I think I got confused on therating between intensity or exercises vs success in competition. Grappling andboxing is odne in the club for fitness and as a grade requirement. One gradingrequirement is being able to take a boxer to the ground and make him submit, nopunches are allowed (the boxer can punch of course).

    By craving knowledge, I mean I’m eager to learn all the techniques (Theresabout 120 different grading requirements from White to Brown Belt, some hard,some easy). Alot of people have the same mentality, not too interested in goinginto competitions. We go over technqiues over and over again until they stickand feel natural.

    Hope I’ve answered all your guys questions, I’m still new to the site, so Iadmit several thigns may be alot higher rated than they should be, yet this isfrom my own experience in martial arts, I’ve tried out alot of clubs in a widerange of martial arts, this one I’ve the most improvement.

  8. Petter is offline

    12th level logic wielder

    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    1,964

    Posted On:
    3/03/2012 2:17am


     Style: BJJ, judo, rapier

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Wing-Kwan-Fu View Post
    ...if I spent my time learning "12 throws", I would also want to know how good I was at throwing people.
    Quote Originally Posted by Pineapple View Post
    ALL of our techniques are practiced on a partner, I think I mentioned it, notsure why you guys think we don’t.
    You misunderstand. Just practising throws on a partner does not tell you how good you are at throwing people. That is, it tells you how good you are at throwing a partner who lets you, or perhaps how good you are at throwing a clubmate who (1) is your friend and doesn't want to hurt you, and (2) shares your instructor and has the same holes in his game as you do in yours.

    Competing in open competitions, on the other hand, shows how good you are at throwing people who really don't want to be thrown, who are trying their damnedest to throw you, and who have different instructors and so different strengths and weaknesses.

    Perfection is a tricky topic, I guess i shoudl have used another word. Reasonwe don’t do competition is because there wouldn’t be much time to practicetechniques for competition. I’ve been to a judo club and msot of the time welearnt tricks for competition, in Peter Morton Academy we learn tricks for selfdefence, things illegal in competition.
    Presumably, then, you don't practice these things with aliveness. Else why can't you compete in something -- judo, BJJ, sub grappling?

    Hope I’ve answered all your guys questions, I’m still new to the site, so Iadmit several thigns may be alot higher rated than they should be
    You didn't answer my question at all: Given that the rating guidelines specifically mention proven success, and given that you don't compete, what makes you feel that the school deserves an 8 in grappling?
    [ petterhaggholm.net | blog | essays ]
    [ self defence: general thoughts | bjj: “don’t go to the ground”? ]
    “The plural of anecdote is anecdotes, not data.”
  9. judoka_uk is offline
    judoka_uk's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    England
    Posts
    4,661

    Posted On:
    3/03/2012 6:01am

    Join us... or die
     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Pineapple View Post
    Also Judo clubs have a point system, more tournements you go to, more points you get, I don't think our club has any relation.
    Hmm I suspect that's because your club doesn't seem to be part of the Australian national governing body for Judo and is not a legitimate Judo club.
  10. Pineapple is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    15

    Posted On:
    3/03/2012 6:06am


     Style: MMA

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    I feel like I'm repeating myself. I've been to several Judo clubs, I knowwhat works and doesnt when it comes to learning throws. I've been in Judotournaments, I feel I've learnt alot more at PM Academy then a Judo clubfocused mainly on Competition. In Take down a boxer, I have to throw the boxer.Unless your saying “Can you throw someone who expects the throw and isresisting” then of course not, not many people can unless they have extremestrength.

    We could compete, but we would probably have to be part of another club, I cbfexplaining this area, if you live in Canberra you would probably understand, inshort only clubs training in competition can go to competition.

    Maybe an 8 is too high for grappling, its probably more of a 6 or 7. None ofthem seemed to describe our club, there is a lot of grappling. We grapple withpartners, learn new techniques, most people go to different branches a fewnights a week inc myself. I’ve grappled with people who do cage fighting andstood about even at times, why do I need to compete in events when I grappleenough with lots of different people?

    You seem to have this idea that we let eachother win, that because we’re with apartner we go easy on eachother, on a grading my partner punched me in the jawbecause I didnt hear a call and had my attention elsewhere. On the same gradingtwo partners did go easy on eachother and failed because of this. I just wantedto give a review on my club, our club has very little advertising, seems torely on word of mouth, I figured with luck some people from Aus may bemotivated.

Page 1 of 6 1 2345 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Powered by vBulletin™© contact@vbulletin.com vBulletin Solutions, Inc. 2011 All rights reserved.