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  1. Hanniballistic is offline
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    By the Hoary Hand of Hoggoth.....

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    Posted On:
    2/12/2012 8:26pm


     Style: JKD & Mok'bara

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I was also sure I read somewhere it simply made for a bigger target and lessened cuts and pain not impact
  2. 307monkeys is offline

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    Posted On:
    2/13/2012 3:48am

    Bullshido Newbie
     

    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
  3. 307monkeys is offline

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    Posted On:
    2/13/2012 3:53am

    Bullshido Newbie
     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    ^ Kinda reminded me of that.
  4. Giga Oni is offline

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    Posted On:
    2/21/2012 9:50am


     Style: Transitioning...

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    boxing should be bareknuckle and with headgear on...cmom its safer for da brain :BabyTroll:
  5. dwkfym is offline
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    Yours truly

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    Posted On:
    2/21/2012 7:02pm

    Business Class Supporting Member
     PDS Rifles Style: Univ. Florida Kickboxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Neo Sigma View Post
    I could swear I've also seen here that there was research done that indicated that the extra weight of headgear caused the head and neck to snap harder and rattle the brain more.
    Well, seeing how if your head doesn't move at all it takes even more damage.. the initial impact is whats the most damaging, so this study and that study are not mutually exclusive. Also, my head hasn't snapped around that often.. so this feels like it is less important.

    But I have turned guys faces a few times, when things got out of hand. Still, I've been in a fight where I got knocked down a bunch of times (and lost), and I don't think my head snapped around much either.

    Uh.. so I guess the conclusion is that I am now retarded, since my head doesn't move much and takes all the impact. damn. I defeated myself with my post. anyways, jokes aside, I'd think reducing the initial impact is most important.

    Still, I feel wearing bigger gloves makes for a safer fight than headgear. I prefer both; 16oz gloves and small headgear.
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  6. Wounded Ronin is offline
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    ...is THE PENETRATOR

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    Posted On:
    3/12/2012 9:02am

    supporting member
     Style: German longsword, .45 ACP

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by dwkfym View Post
    Well, seeing how if your head doesn't move at all it takes even more damage.. the initial impact is whats the most damaging, so this study and that study are not mutually exclusive. Also, my head hasn't snapped around that often.. so this feels like it is less important.

    But I have turned guys faces a few times, when things got out of hand. Still, I've been in a fight where I got knocked down a bunch of times (and lost), and I don't think my head snapped around much either.

    Uh.. so I guess the conclusion is that I am now retarded, since my head doesn't move much and takes all the impact. damn. I defeated myself with my post. anyways, jokes aside, I'd think reducing the initial impact is most important.

    Still, I feel wearing bigger gloves makes for a safer fight than headgear. I prefer both; 16oz gloves and small headgear.
    Oh, that's true. Does it matter if the padding's on the hand versus on the head?
    “nobody shoots anybody in the face unless you’re a hit man or a video gamer.” - Jack Thompson
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  7. Wing-Kwan-Fu is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/23/2012 1:58pm


     Style: Standup, Ground-fighting

    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I'm guessing the benefit is in shock absorption but not so much in preventing head movement?

    Why can't these articles link to some actual data? We get no indication of how significant the difference is between configurations, what ranges of KE/head mass were used, nothing but broad strokes. Has someone found the actual paper, or did I miss something (tiny cell phone screen).
  8. new2bjj is offline

    Senior Member

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    Posted On:
    6/26/2013 7:48pm


     Style: TKD, MT, KEMPO

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Any studies of Kendo and concussions? Less Vision, but less neck snapping.
    "Coffee is for Closers" GlenGarry Glenross
  9. kai-ru is offline

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    Posted On:
    7/07/2013 8:43pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Karate

    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    It worked for me it will work for you

    Quote Originally Posted by Masaka! View Post
    this one time i read about the death of an ammy fighter who went a few bouts in a short period of time, the article said something along the lines of headgear not significantly decreasing chances of injury. am i the only one recalling this?
    I personally have not read this article however I do feel like commenting on a trend I often see in the martial arts and well most reporting outside of the scientific community. I call this trend the "it worked for me so it will work for you hypotheses". It could also be called "it killed Johnny so don't try it."

    For too often I see people claiming things in the martial arts like well Sensei so and so lived until he was 100 years old therefore if you do his style of MA you will also live to be 100 years old. It is just a shame Andy Hug and Bruce Lee were never let in on this secret. Or in this case some one loosely referencing an article that may have existed about one guy who may have died while wearing head gear.

    One ammy fighter dying while wearing headgear may make headlines and it will surely sell papers, collect comments and fan the flames of those who rally against organized fighting but really it says little about the sport or anything else involved. This individual fighter may have been fatigued. They could have been suffering from an eating disorder, simply had a weak neck or had a whole array of of underlying issues that lead to their death.

    So where am I going with this and how is it relevant to this thread? First I am simply trying to state that anecdotal evidence is not all that helpful. It is usually misleading and full of confounding variables. That is why the research on headgear mentioned in this thread is relevant. Sometimes it is important to study things that seem to be obvious so that we may control variables and see if the original hypothesis was correct or not.
  10. Keslet is online now

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    Posted On:
    7/18/2013 3:12pm


     Style: Wrestle, Kickbox, Aikido

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I'm not claiming to be an expert or anything...I do know that in violent impacts there can be multiple contusions to the brain, typically from the initial impact and then from the subsequent impact of the brain moving about...I think the phenomenon is called "coup/countrecoup" or something to that effect. For combat sport participants, where we are looking at an accumulation of lesser injuries over time, I could see where an argument could be made that lessening head movement could be positive just in and of itself...take this as you will...
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