233386 Bullies, 3862 online  
  • Register
Our Sponsors:

Results 51 to 60 of 83
Page 6 of 9 FirstFirst ... 23456 789 LastLast
Sponsored Links Spacer Image
  1. It is Fake is offline
    It is Fake's Avatar

    Administrator

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    34,104

    Posted On:
    6/30/2012 1:17pm

    staff
     Style: xingyi

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Started with Shaolin Do, then quit and trained with other more knowledgeable teachers. I'd do boxing, unless you can find a Xingyi teacher who actually puts his students into Sanda, Leitai, Koshu or Sansho tournaments.

    Minus forms, the techniques and power generation, contrary to what you wil hear *cough* internal *cough* Vs external *cough* is extremely similar.
  2. Gryphon is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    11

    Posted On:
    6/30/2012 1:23pm


     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I have access to one of the best xing yi instructors in N.America. Unfortunately, like most traditional chinese IMA schools, they don't spar which probably greatly reduces the effectiveness in real combat. They do however do some 2 person drills etc...

    But yea, from all accounts training an external boxing or thai boxing seems to yield better results.
  3. It is Fake is offline
    It is Fake's Avatar

    Administrator

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    34,104

    Posted On:
    6/30/2012 1:29pm

    staff
     Style: xingyi

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    2-man drills/forms are a fun training tool that doesn't help without sparring. Even with my McDojo training I felt the fact we sparred was leaps and bounds over some of the non sparring Xingyi teachers I worked with.

    Their forms and explanations were helpful, but their applicability was always a little off to me. You can always tell when someone hasn't sparred because their SD explanations have to be severely altered. If you have previous striking and sparring training go for it. If not, I'd recommend at least a year if not two of boxing or Muay Thai.
  4. Gryphon is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    11

    Posted On:
    6/30/2012 2:27pm


     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Thanks, I will begin with MT before going on the XY.

    Going back to something you posted earlier in this thread... do you believe that it is easier to go from a ring-sport type MA to a TMA than the other way around?

    I had always thought that it's easier to go from more structured (TMAs) to less structured (boxing etc,)
  5. It is Fake is offline
    It is Fake's Avatar

    Administrator

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    34,104

    Posted On:
    6/30/2012 2:44pm

    staff
     Style: xingyi

    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    IMO, It is much harder to escape the rigidity that tends to be taught in many TMA schools. You know right block here, left foot there, and structure is of utmost importance.

    This might sound confusing, but it is my based on my personal expreience.

    I don't want to say it is less structured, but you create your own style of fighting from the basics in boxing and Muay Thai. In most TMA Schools, which I think leads to most problems, you have preset patterns of some old master that fit his body type. So, you tend to follow that severe structure. When this is fully ingrained, you have to train it out of you when you do a free form style like boxing or muay Thai. The problems I had were trying not to be structured and trying to stay away from rhythm and patterns.

    In reverse, you'll have all of the basics in a free form environment. When you go to a more structured environment, it'll be minor corrections moving into a rigid system.
  6. Tameshiwhaty? is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Washington
    Posts
    163

    Posted On:
    6/30/2012 3:00pm


     Style: Shotokan

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by It is Fake View Post
    IMO, It is much harder to escape the rigidity that tends to be taught in many TMA schools. You know right block here, left foot there, and structure is of utmost importance.

    This might sound confusing, but it is my based on my personal expreience.

    I don't want to say it is less structured, but you create your own style of fighting from the basics in boxing and Muay Thai. In most TMA Schools, which I think leads to most problems, you have preset patterns of some old master that fit his body type. So, you tend to follow that severe structure. When this is fully ingrained, you have to train it out of you when you do a free form style like boxing or muay Thai. The problems I had were trying not to be structured and trying to stay away from rhythm and patterns.

    In reverse, you'll have all of the basics in a free form environment. When you go to a more structured environment, it'll be minor corrections moving into a rigid system.
    Personally I can attest to this I went from kick boxing to karate and it was pretty easy to just move right in, the stances were different but one good thing about kickboxing is the versatility it teaches you. The hip movements are similar and my round kick I loved so is there but a little different more knee flex and pull back in stead of haul ass through the opponent, but that kick is there too, sadly most don't teach it because it isn't allowed in the point sparring tournaments, lol just thought i'd give my two cents.
  7. Gryphon is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    11

    Posted On:
    6/30/2012 3:19pm


     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Thanks for the useful information...it makes a lot of sense. I will start with Muay Thai as a striking art and move to something more traditional from there.
  8. upkick is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    boston
    Posts
    22

    Posted On:
    7/26/2012 7:26am


     Style: karate/kickbox

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I did some light sparring with a multiple dan uechi ryu black belt and he did some sticky hands type **** on me. kind of similar to redirection in the judo/mt clinch. Their stance is similar to the one katsunori kikuno uses.
  9. RurikGreenwulf is offline

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    ROU
    Posts
    1,239

    Posted On:
    7/26/2012 7:02pm


     Style: Humbleness

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by upkick View Post
    I did some light sparring with a multiple dan uechi ryu black belt and he did some sticky hands type **** on me. kind of similar to redirection in the judo/mt clinch. Their stance is similar to the one katsunori kikuno uses.
    Uechi Ryu practicioners use a lot of "guard breaking" That is pushing the nearest hand a opponent has against them to creat a opening and strike

    When facing opponents who use a more closed guard they have a much harder time creating openings this way
  10. Gryphon is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    11

    Posted On:
    7/26/2012 8:20pm


     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    The Uechi system was designed for defending against untrained opponents right?

    Can any of you guys who have experience with the style comment on its strengths and weaknesses as well as whether it offers any unique advantages over systems like muay thai or kyokushin that have a tighter guard?
Page 6 of 9 FirstFirst ... 23456 789 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Powered by vBulletin™© contact@vbulletin.com vBulletin Solutions, Inc. 2011 All rights reserved.