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  1. #1

    Join Date
    Apr 2009
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Is Ju-Te Ryu a Legit Judo/Goshinjutsu derivative?

    Okay.. here is guy that basically has a 1st dan in TKD but has since moved up to 9th dan in his own style.

    Let him talk for himself.

    AN INTRODUCTION TO JU-TE-RYU H2H KARATE Monday, 22 September 2008 The Ju-Te self-defense system developed out of my experiences in teaching Tae Kwon Do, commonly called in the early 70s "Korean Karate." In those days, the American public was less informed about martial arts, and assumed that if one studied an art like karate or kung-fu, he or she would automatically become a deadly fighting machine a la Bruce Lee, or David Carradine of the TV series "Kung-Fu."

    I enrolled in Tae Kwon Do when I was in college because I wanted to learn self-defense. I didn't know the difference between one martial art and another in those days. I chose TKD simply on the basis of an advertising flier I saw on campus. I should point out that the TKD of that era was not the kid-dominated, daycare system commonly encountered in many dojangs today, but a rugged, military-influenced fighting art with heavy contact and very strict discipline.

    I benefited from my study of TKD in many ways, but reached the conclusion that it was lacking as a self-defense system. Too much emphasis was placed on high kicking and the practice of katas (hyungs), with little attention paid to weapons and ground fighting and in-close street situations. I began teaching TKD from a strictly self-defense perspective, modifying much of what I had been taught, thus beginning an evolution that led ultimately to the formation of the Ju-Te-Ryu Goshinjutsu system. Permit me to briefly map out the various stages in the development of JTR by decades:

    The decade of the 70s can be labeled as the period of Proto-Ju-Te. Dissatisfied with conventional TKD, I began developing a more ecumenical, less style-oriented approach. In those days, people tended to affiliate with one martial art with fierce loyalty. Many sensei prohibited their students from learning another fighting system. What I was doing was frowned upon in many circles. I researched Chinese arts such as Shaolin Kung-Fu, Pa-Kua, Wing-Chun, Kempo and Hung Gar to see what self-defense methods they contained that would be useful, as well as Western arts such as fencing and Savate. Some today have commented that I was ahead of my time and already practicing MMA while most others were mired in traditionalism, and I would say that is true. I interacted with practitioners of other karate styles and compared techniques and training methods. But what I was practicing and teaching during this time was essentially a modified form of TKD.

    The decade of the 80s could be called the era of Old School Ju-Te. I began incorporating throws and ground work into my system, shifting from less of a TKD base to more Judo/Jujutsu. In the beginning I had no special name for what I was teaching. I simply called it, "Gendai Goshinjutsu," or "Modern Self-Defense." During the early 80s my students still practiced in karate gis, entered karate tournaments and were taught self-defense oriented katas I had developed. By the mid 80s, we were training in judogis and emphasizing more grappling techniques. "Ju-Te-Ryu" was officially born. More and more people from various martial arts were attracted to my system. The ranking in those days consisted of only four belts--white, blue, brown and black--with stripes awarded in between each belt. Later in the decade provision was made for dan degrees. During this time period I engaged in Aikido, Kali and Muay Thai training and formally bid TKD adieu.

    The decade of the 90s was the period of integration. Katas were no longer taught. The colored belt system was expanded. More throws and grappling methods were introduced into the syllabus. I continued to revise and perfect, seeking to make JTR one of the best and most practical self-defense systems available. It was during this decade that the first Black Belts were awarded.

    The first decade of the 2000 has been a period of maturation. Standards have been raised even higher than in previous decades. The technical ability of JTR practitioners continues to increase. The first Senior Instructor rank has been awarded. A more diverse and flexible training approach has been devised, which brings us to the subject of the H2H Karate system.

    The Basic Level of Ju-Te-Ryu consists of two related, but separate, training programs, Combat Judo and H2H Karate. Each has its own syllabus. Combat Judo emphasizes grappling, throwing and take downs, whereas H2H (Hand-to-Hand) Karate places a greater emphasis on stand-up fighting. Both programs contain elements of the other; the Combat Judo program involves kicks and strikes, even as the H2H program involves take downs and Jujutsu-oriented techniques.

    The H2H Karate program incorporates the use of functional karate and TKD techniques for self-defense. There are no katas or flamboyant kicks taught; only hard-hitting, "wham and scram" stand-up fighting methods. The karategi is worn in class. The ranking system is similar to what was used in the Old School JTR era. There are five belts below Shodan--white, blue, purple, green and brown, with three stripes that must be earned between each belt. Stripes are informally awarded by the instructor. Belts are awarded on the basis of formal examination. The H2H Karate program terminates at Shodan. Any student wishing to progress further in Ju-Te can study the various Black Belt specialization courses available, or enroll in the Combat Judo program if he or she wishes to learn additional unarmed self-protection methods.

    Like the Combat Judo course, anyone wishing to be certified in H2H Karate, whether mudansha or Black Belt holder, must undergo formal, ongoing training onsite with a certified instructor. This program is of benefit to students who prefer a "wham and scram" approach of self-defense and do not wish to prolong contact with an attacker. It is also of value to instructors who lack a matted area to teach, or who are prohibited from teaching groundfighting by a health club owner or overseer due to litigation concerns.

    I have a friend moving to the area and he wanted either a judo or bjj school to go to. He found this online.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Apr 2009
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    22
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Here is the only website I could find and it is for a school 300 miles from where Blackwell lives.

    http://www.juteryuaustin.com/

    Sorry, I can't get this all in one post.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Apr 2009
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    Blackwell's email

    My friend emailed Blackwell and asked for specific background on either his Judo or Aikido training. He wondered with whom Blackwell had learned his grappling skills and such. He wanted to know his lineage and how much his school concentrated on Ukemi. This is Blackwell's vague reply.

    Greetings!
    Your email sent to the Austin JTR website was forwarded to me. You asked, as I understand it, how it is that I teach grappling while I come from a striking background. It is because of the shortcomings I discovered that exist in a strictly striking background that turned me to research grappling. "Combat Judo" is a generic post-WW 2 term referring essentially to eclectic forms of self-defense utilizing judo/jujutsu, karate, and methods derived from other disciplines. Ju-Te is a form of "Combat Judo;" but the term is not meant in any exclusive sense. The term "judo" predates Jigoro Kano, the founder of what is known as Kodokan Judo, and refers philosophically to a particular way of utilizing an attacker's force. The throwing and grappling methods studied in Ju-Te can be found in judo and other systems, but neither I or my students claim any affiliation with the Kodokan or with Olympic Judo. What I teach is classified as Goshinjutsu, or "Self-Defense Art." The system is strictly my own, based upon research, experience, and hard knocks. Grappling is taught, but not exclusively, being as it is only one component in self-defense.
    You state you wish to work on your grappling. To what end? To compete? For self-defense? The objectives are quite different. There are a number of students currently training in Ju-Te who come from grappling backgrounds--Judo, BJJ, wrestling. A number are ranked in their respective disciplines. They are studying it for its practical approach to self-defense. If you are interested specifically in self-defense, you are invited to come by and observe/participate in a class. I am currently an Adjunct Professor at UT-Pan Am in Edinburg and teach martial arts in the Health & Kinesiology Department. I also teach a class at the Harvey Drive Church of Christ gym in McAllen on Mondays from 7-9, and teach at the Grand Palms Health Club in McAllen. If, however, you are interested in competition and in specifically grappling, you might check out some of the BJJ schools in the area.
    Best wishes,

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
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    Texas
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    Martial arts background

    I found some of his training on the website. It does not sound like he has any grappling experience other then what he learned from seminars (Aikido at that) and from books. Here is what is stated on the JuTeRyu site:

    joined the university chapter of the Jhoon Rhee Institute of Tae Kwon Do where he received his early ranks from champion fighter Jeff Smith as well as Grandmaster Jhoon Rhee himself. He later earned his black belt in the art under Roger Clark, a third dan and former Army Ranger.Mr. Blackwell is a graduate of the Travis County Sheriff's Academy where he completed over 100 hours in Corrections Officer and Defensive Tactics training. He served as a TECLOSE-accredited defensive tactics instructor and has been a member of the American Society of Law Enforcement Trainers. He underwent training in the Personal Management of Aggressive Behavior (PMAB) program at the Austin State School. He attended Aikido seminars taught by master instructors Robert Nadeau and the late Ahira Tohei, both whom had studied directly under Morihei Uyeshiba, the art's founder. He received training in Kali and Muay Thai under Ray Parra and Parra's instructor, the late Ted Lucaylucay.

  5. #5

  6. #6

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    Apr 2009
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    I worked out there

    I was invited with a friend from work to go work out at his club. Turns out it was Blackwell's JuTeRyu

    The first thing I noticed is that it looked like kids fighting on the playground. They pushed things to the limit and 3 people had to drop out of the workout because of pushing locks too far. They didn't understand the basic of Judo (minimum effort, maximum effect), and they didn't know how to fall. There seemed to be limited understanding of basic holds such as wakigatame.

    Blackwell seemed sincere in his quest but I was disturbed by his down talking of other martial artists in the area. I was also disturbed by the lack of practical knowledge.

    I will occasionally catch his "university" class and it is a joke. He had adults playing duck, duck, goose. He was doing front handed palm fist slaps (not strikes) and explaining how it could stop somebody cold (I will admit a palm strike or shomenate is deadly but not a slap). If you look at his website then he says he wears a red belt because he is the master of his "style" but at the university he wears a black belt. If he is the creator of his style then why all the oriental trappings. He could just have Spanish names for things as this is deep south Texas. Why don't people that create all their own styles always give them meaningless orient names and trappings is it because they secretly feel their "art" is some how inferior.

    I found his email and invited him to post here. He declined (big surprise) but I will post his reply here.

    Dear Mr. Garza,
    Thank you for your concern. I have been quite upfront about the development of Ju-Te-Ryu and its objectives, so I'm not sure what more I can say. If I were claiming to teach an established style such as Shotokan or Sambo or whatever, I could understand the indignation. But the Ju-Te-Ryu Goshinjutsu system is strictly my own, and I have made that very clear.
    It seems that some take umbrage at me teaching grappling techniques, but the fact is that I do teach throws, take downs, ground work, etc. that are pertinent to self-defense, and have for over thirty years. As I explained to one of the inquirers, a number of my students are trained and ranked in BJJ in the Machado lineage. One, who holds a Brown Belt in BJJ and who has competed in a number of grappling competitions and been in the martial arts for a good number of years, recently earned his Ikkyu in JTR and plans to pursue his Shodan in my system. Another of my students, who is currently a Sandan under me, was a competitive wrestler in both high school and college. Both men, who are certainly well-versed in grappling, have studied JTR for more than a few years. And they are not the only ones who come from a grappling background. I suspect that if I were completely incompetent where grappling is concerned, or teaching unsound principles, they would have spotted that early on, don't you think?
    The point to be made is that JTR is not strictly a grappling art. Our concern is strictly self-defense; nothing more, nothing less. We are very open and ecumenical where other arts are concerned, and do not make any outrageous claims for the system. I do believe, however, that JTR is one of a number of viable options for a person seeking serious self-defense training and make no apology for it. If one does not wish to train in it, that is certainly his/her prerogative.
    Best wishes to you,
    Mike Blackwell

  7. #7

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    That is some ugly randori. I asked around with my Judo and Bjj friends and no one has rolled with these guys either in comp or in practice.

  8. #8
    Mtripp's Avatar
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    His writings seem to be taken from the Juko-Kai world.

    My question would be why a Korean Martial Art is using Japanese terms.

    Jute means "10 hands" and refers to a small metal baton which was the early version of the extending batons the Japanese Police use to this day.

    Combat Judo seems to be getting alot of play today, but there are darn few people who actually trained with people who learned it first hand, rather than thought the name sounded cool. Moreover, the legitimate Combat Judo people all did to Kodokan Judo, did Randori, and all were involved in Randori and Shiai.

    In short; he is full of crap.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Texas
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!


    I was actually looking for something else online and came across this. I post it here even though this thread is squashed.

    One more guy practicing Jute ryu

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
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    Texas
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    http://www.pkckarate.com/mrl.htm

    Sorry. Messed up the image but here is the link.

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