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  1. Malachai is offline

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    Posted On:
    12/18/2011 1:45pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Kenpo

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    What Chinese art uses and teaches use of the 3 section bo?

    What are uses a staff that is in 3 sections?
  2. Hanniballistic is offline
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    By the Hoary Hand of Hoggoth.....

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    Posted On:
    12/18/2011 2:57pm


     Style: JKD & Mok'bara

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Typically you will see it in Shaolin or Wu-Shu.

    If legends are true (which they probably aren't) it was originally in Taizu Changquan because the same founder of that style is rumoured (translation: probably made up) to have invented it
  3. It is Fake is offline
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    Posted On:
    12/18/2011 2:58pm

    staff
     Style: xingyi

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Almost all teach them minus the so called internal arts. Whether it is there from inception is another question.
  4. Hanniballistic is offline
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    By the Hoary Hand of Hoggoth.....

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    Posted On:
    12/18/2011 3:00pm


     Style: JKD & Mok'bara

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Ooh! I got the answer...probably not

    I blame Gordon Liu
  5. Malachai is offline

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    Posted On:
    12/18/2011 3:34pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Kenpo

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    thank you for the help everyone, i found a wu-shu center a few miles away from where I live and I think I will cross train on this with Kajukenbo as there classes are at different times luckily
  6. W. Rabbit is offline
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    You know me...the snakebite hiss, the Devil's Grip, the Iron Fist

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    Posted On:
    12/18/2011 3:49pm

    supporting member
     Style: Hung Fist, BJJ, Qi Gong

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    L2Search function: (http://www.bullshido.net/forums/arch.../t-106317.html)

    This is the best objectively researched article on this weapon I've seen so far.

    Exec summary: no real link to Shaolin, and all sources are legend

    "The Lethal Three Section Staff of Kungfu
    By Gene Ching

    In the wake of Bruce Lee, the next event to change the way we looked at the Kungfu genre was from the 1978 classic Master Killer. Originally titled The 36 Chambers of Shaolin (Shaolin Sanshiliu Fang), the theme of this film was transformation. All martial artists seek transformation, so Master Killer touched our hearts and earned a cherished place as one of the greatest martial arts epics ever. Gordon Liu played Liu Yu Te, who would be transformed through the course of the picture into the legendary Shaolin Temple monk, San Te. In the movie, Liu advances through trials and training of mythic proportions until ultimately a rival monk, a master of butterfly swords, challenges him to a duel. After two humiliating defeats, San Te makes a discovery during his kungfu practice that transforms the arsenal of Shaolin, as well as the course of the Temple, forever. He invents the three section staff. Armed with this new weapon, he deftly defeats his enemy, granting him permission to teach Shaolin Kungfu outside the Temple to Manchu rebels.

    Beyond those memorable training scenes, San Te's creation of the three section staff would be ingrained from the mythology of the martial arts movies into the legends of kungfu. This special weapon is unique to the Chinese arts. Few weapons encapsulate the complex character of Chinese weapons as well. Just as movie fans cherish Master Killer, kungfu aficionados treasure the three section staff.

    Despite the movie myths, kungfu scholars attribute the actual creation of the three section staff to the first emperor of the Song Dynasty, formally known as Song Taizu (960-976). There are two legends. The first is that Song Taizu's favorite staff was split into two during a battle, so he linked the broken ends together and created the first two section staff. This weapon consisted of a handle section that was twice as long as the flail-end section. Later, when the handle was split in two, he linked it together again and created the first three section staff.

    The second legend is similar, however it details that the emperor's staff was split into equal thirds at the first break, so the invention of the two section staff is not attributed to him. However, it is worth noting that in this legend, the invention of the three section staff and its subsequent mastery all occurred in the heat of the battlefield. To redeem his shattered staff by transforming the weapon to meet the life-or-death urgency of combat must have been quite the inspired moment.


    Beyond the three section staff (and the two section too) Song Taizu is also attributed with founding several kungfu styles: Taizuquan, Changquan and Hongquan. Taizuquan was a fighting style of the emperor's court for several following dynasties. It consisted of 32 hand forms and the four basic weapons: staff, broadsword, spear and straight sword. Today, it is rare, at least in the West.

    Changquan or "long fist" should be familiar to all contemporary kungfu practitioners. Originally, it was a style that emphasized speed and long distance fighting, using yang to defeat yin, so to speak. Following the renovations of modern China, Changquan has become a modern wushu competitive form, combining the best elements of the five dominant northern styles: Cha, Hua, Hua (different character in Chinese but spelled the same in English) Pao and Shaolin.

    Hongquan or "red fist" is distinct from the popular southern style Hung Gar (Hong Jia in Mandarin.) Hongquan's curriculum consists of several hand forms including one called taizuhongquan. It was another style that was absorbed and influenced by the Shaolin Temple. Today, xiaohongquan (small red fist) and dahongquan (big red fist) are standard forms of the Songshan Shaolin kungfu and are receiving widespread popularity due to Shaolin Temple's recent meteoric rise. Just as in any creation myth, the validity of Song Taizu's claim as the originator of so many kungfu transformations is questionable. Here, it is important to consider Chinese culture and the esteem bestowed upon their great emperors. The first emperor of any dynasty is by nature always a martial emperor. This is because the only method for a dynastic transformation is war. Accordingly, many first emperors adopt the title "Wudi" (martial emperor). Song Taizu arose to leadership out of one of China's darkest periods, known as the Five Dynasties (907-960.) Following the woeful collapse of the mighty Tang Dynasty, China had plunged into this half century of war, treachery and chaos. The longest reigning of the Five Dynasties lasted only sixteen years, the shortest only four. Zhao Kuangyin was born in 927, the eldest son of General Zhao Hongyin of the Later Zhou, the fifth of the Five Dynasties. He was forced to ascend the throne at midnight by mutinous officers and adopted another popular first emperor title, "Taizu" (supreme progenitor).

    Under Song rule, China was once again unified, and the arts and culture flourished. Confucian ethics governed the new emperor's philosophy. Music, poetry, painting and calligraphy replaced the martial arts and combat sports made popular in the Tang. Troops were banned from plundering the people, civil servants were forbidden to practice swordsmanship and past generals were persuaded into early retirement. Among the contributions of this glorious dynasty were the first printing of paper money, the first movable-type printing press, the first formula for gunpowder, an Imperial library of 80,000 books, instigation of civil examinations, construction of an astronomical clock tower, and the recording of a supernova. So in the big picture, Song Taizu's contributions to the martial arts are fairly minor, vastly overshadowed by his contributions to the world. Nevertheless, the question of Song Taizu's invention of the three section staff will always remain a romantic yet insignificant mystery of history.
    Last edited by W. Rabbit; 12/18/2011 4:16pm at .
  7. It is Fake is offline
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    Posted On:
    12/18/2011 4:07pm

    staff
     Style: xingyi

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I like how neither of you fully answered the question. He wasn't looking for a history lesson. Now you sent him to Wushu.
  8. W. Rabbit is offline
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    You know me...the snakebite hiss, the Devil's Grip, the Iron Fist

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    Posted On:
    12/18/2011 4:15pm

    supporting member
     Style: Hung Fist, BJJ, Qi Gong

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    There is a section in the middle of the article that covers the functional aspects, uses, disadvantages, etc.

    Here you go without the history part. I edited it out of my last post, enjoy.

    The three section staff possesses a unique nature distinguishing it among the other common weapons of kungfu. It is typically classified as a long weapon of the staff family, but it is also a flexible weapon with properties of a double short weapon. Generally, each section is equal in length, measuring about two feet or more for an overall length of six feet plus. The three staff sections are usually composed of woods such as rattan, white waxwood or various hardwoods like oak or mahogany. In days of old, this wood would be treated with special oils to maintain its natural hardness and resiliency. Today, much of the knowledge of personal weapon care is lost so wood oiling is usually neglected. Legend tells of weapons made of iron or steel, which must have carried a tremendous weight. A few three section staffs are still made of metal; however now they are hollow and in no way unwieldy. The sections are linked by cord or chain. Chain is more popular, since the links can also be used for striking, and that chunk of chain packs a brutal wallop. Occasionally, the tips of the flails are capped with metal too, which adds more vicious sting to an already ruthless blow.

    For the most part, the sections remain smooth for easy grip transitions, though some practitioners modify their weapons by filing small grooves near the links and at the ends. These grooves add texture for a more secure grip purchase. However, they also make it more difficult for smooth flowing grip transitions, so this small addition has its plusses and minuses. Grooves also create a rougher striking surface on the flail ends. Like the serrations of a knife or a saw, it increases the chance that the blunt end will cut open an opponent. Some fantastic three section staffs depicted in modern comic books and video games have gone so far to as to add cartoonish spikes on the flail ends. This modification is imaginative yet impractical. Many of the long distance techniques require the user to grip the flail ends, a handhold that is significantly impeded by the placement of such spikes.

    Versatility is the forte of the three section staff. When fully extended, it has the length of a long pole. This is applicable for large sweeping attacks that quickly clear a wide area. Moreover, such attacks are difficult to block since the chain will wrap over or slide under most defenses. When collapsed, it is like two short batons. Here, the two end flail sections can alternate between offense and defense. Most commonly, the lead flail is used to parry and trap while the rear flail delivers its wicked riposte. When the center section is held, both flails can swing freely to strike like nunchaku.

    Conventionally, these flail ends are the strikers, but in the hands of an adept user, both the chain links and the center section have striking capability too. When the chain links are used for attack, the flail ends transform inside out to become the handles. Tricky techniques tangle an opponent's weapon, creating an opening for the blow of the staff's links tipped with metal chain. Also, both ends can be grabbed and the center section can be swung around for blocking and striking. The most thrilling and challenging techniques of this weapon are its wide variety of spins. There is a yin-yang-like aphorism in kungfu that says a flexible weapon should be made straight. This is achieved through the constant centrifugal force generated by complex spins only kungfu could invent. Given the weapon's versatility, each spin has its own unique characteristics and applications. A practitioner who understands three section staff can flow seamlessly from one spin to the next, creating a dazzling and lethal web of wood and steel.
  9. It is Fake is offline
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    Posted On:
    12/18/2011 4:33pm

    staff
     Style: xingyi

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I guess I have to spell it out even more. He asked which arts uses them, Hannibal gave him two and you gave him none.

    Read the title to understand his poor spelling.
  10. Hanniballistic is offline
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    By the Hoary Hand of Hoggoth.....

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    Posted On:
    12/18/2011 5:39pm


     Style: JKD & Mok'bara

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by It is Fake View Post
    I like how neither of you fully answered the question. He wasn't looking for a history lesson. Now you sent him to Wushu.
    I thought I answered it pretty succinctly all things being considered - it will be either Shaolin or Wu Shu

    Can't see what else to add.......
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