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  1. Devil is online now
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    His heart was visible, and the dismal sack that maketh excrement of what is eaten.

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    Posted On:
    12/01/2011 4:44pm

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    Quote Originally Posted by cualltaigh View Post
    What industry are you in/ do you service?
    Medical devices.
  2. Devil is online now
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    His heart was visible, and the dismal sack that maketh excrement of what is eaten.

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    Posted On:
    12/01/2011 5:01pm

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    Quote Originally Posted by jspeedy View Post
    Not sure if this belongs in another thread....Do you have any advice on how to answer those annoying interview questions and what I can do to stand out in an interview?

    Examples of the annoying questions:

    What is you best quality?
    What are you most proud of?
    What is your worst quality?
    Describe one time you blew it.

    I figure I should just try to relate the answers to work related issues. However, I'm looking to enter the medical field as a recently licensed radiation therapist, I have no experience other than school clinicals and I assume i'll be competing with other experienced people.
    The interview questions I use are behavioral questions. Tell us about a time you did this. Tell us about a time you did that. Tell us about a time when something went to ****. Tell us this or that about yourself. Basically, the kinds of questions you're describing.

    Here's how to prepare for that: Get online and search for a list of behavioral interview questions. You'll find tons. Get a list of 100 or so you can work with. Read them and think about how you would answer.

    What you'll find is that there may be 100 or 500 or 1000 questions, but they're all really just different ways of asking a handful of things. When you practice this way, you'll start to see that. It will also force you to think about specific situations you've encountered. With a few hours of practice you'll have an answer ready for almost any question you can be asked.

    You've asked a good question. I prepared exactly like that for my current position because I knew my company asked those types of questions. I knocked it out of the park and it's the main reason I'm sitting where I am now.

    There are two critical things with these types of questions. You want to be confident and you want your answer to be conversational and not sound rehearsed. Practicing like I said will help with this because instead of memorizing questions you'll start thinking about the actual things you want to talk about.

    Second, the main area where people **** the bed is by not providing detail. Don't give vague answers like "if that happened to me I'd do this". They want you to tell them a story about a specific situation you've encountered. Keep in mind if you're interviewing with a larger organization, there's pressure for them to be fair. Hiring managers often have to justify their hiring choices. So even if they like you they may not be able to hire them if you don't give them enough specifics they can point to as to why you should be hired.

    Ordinarily you want to give business related examples. If you're fresh out of college or whatever, they'll understand. Talk about whatever you think is relevant in that case. Don't have anything on your resume you can't talk about. You can word things to show your experience in the best light, but don't bullshit and have to cover it with a lie in the interview. It will go poorly for you.
  3. submessenger is offline
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    Transmaniacon MC

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    Posted On:
    12/01/2011 5:02pm

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    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by jubei33 View Post
    Dear poster, how do I be the boss? I was hoping to get information in that regard, rather than information on how to be an obnoxious, backstabbing employee.
    Hire somebody to do your work for you.
  4. jspeedy is offline
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    Posted On:
    12/01/2011 5:12pm


     Style: FMA

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by devil View Post
    The interview questions I use are behavioral questions. Tell us about a time you did this. Tell us about a time you did that. Tell us about a time when something went to ****. Tell us this or that about yourself. Basically, the kinds of questions you're describing.

    Here's how to prepare for that: Get online and search for a list of behavioral interview questions. You'll find tons. Get a list of 100 or so you can work with. Read them and think about how you would answer.

    What you'll find is that there may be 100 or 500 or 1000 questions, but they're all really just different ways of asking a handful of things. When you practice this way, you'll start to see that. It will also force you to think about specific situations you've encountered. With a few hours of practice you'll have an answer ready for almost any question you can be asked.

    You've asked a good question. I prepared exactly like that for my current position because I knew my company asked those types of questions. I knocked it out of the park and it's the main reason I'm sitting where I am now.

    There are two critical things with these types of questions. You want to be confident and you want your answer to be conversational and not sound rehearsed. Practicing like I said will help with this because instead of memorizing questions you'll start thinking about the actual things you want to talk about.

    Second, the main area where people **** the bed is by not providing detail. Don't give vague answers like "if that happened to me I'd do this". They want you to tell them a story about a specific situation you've encountered. Keep in mind if you're interviewing with a larger organization, there's pressure for them to be fair. Hiring managers often have to justify their hiring choices. So even if they like you they may not be able to hire them if you don't give them enough specifics they can point to as to why you should be hired.

    Ordinarily you want to give business related examples. If you're fresh out of college or whatever, they'll understand. Talk about whatever you think is relevant in that case. Don't have anything on your resume you can't talk about. You can word things to show your experience in the best light, but don't bullshit and have to cover it with a lie in the interview. It will go poorly for you.
    So do you think referencing my experience as a waiter or electrician and relating it to the question would be acceptable?
  5. Devil is online now
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    His heart was visible, and the dismal sack that maketh excrement of what is eaten.

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    Posted On:
    12/01/2011 5:16pm

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    --
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    Quote Originally Posted by jubei33 View Post
    Dear poster, how do I be the boss? I was hoping to get information in that regard, rather than information on how to be an obnoxious, backstabbing employee.
    I'm not sure what you could construe as backstabbing from my post. Rereading it, the only thing I could see that might be taken that way is the comment about doing 20% of the project load and someone else doing 80%. For the record, the person I'm referring to works for me and it is her job to do the 80%. It has nothing to do with me not carrying my weight.

    When I said "How to be a Boss" I meant it in the slang sense, like this: (Like a Boss - The act of doing something as a boss would do.)

    If you want a more serious answer to "How to be THE Boss", it's simple. First, almost everyone has a boss and is therefore an employee to someone. If you want to be a boss, succeed as an employee and look for your opportunities to advance. If you want to be THE boss, invent something cool or identify a need in the marketplace you can fill. Congratulations, you're an entrepreneur! All the money and all the problems are yours. You're THE BOSS.
  6. Devil is online now
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    His heart was visible, and the dismal sack that maketh excrement of what is eaten.

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    Posted On:
    12/01/2011 5:18pm

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    Quote Originally Posted by jspeedy View Post
    So do you think referencing my experience as a waiter or electrician and relating it to the question would be acceptable?
    Yes, use what you've got.
  7. Rivington is offline
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    Posted On:
    12/01/2011 5:47pm

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     Style: Taijiquan/Shuai-Chiao/BJJ

    --
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    Quote Originally Posted by devil View Post
    Some people will major in Art History and become millionaires. That person is not you.
    It's not me either, but I am near the top of my arts-based field. I have some suggestions too for people who do want to pursue arts careers—these should be seen as additions to devil's list, though some of them may seem to be contradicting the list.

    * Develop technical and manual skills. Carpentry/electrical, computing (hardware and coding, not just applications), at least somewhat of a grounding in the natural and applied sciecnes. Know how to take things apart and put them back together. The soft skills involved are easily transferable, and lots of arts jobs are technical and manual in nature-art installations, production flows in publishing, the entire electrical department on motion picture sets, etc. Daydreamers are a dime a dozen; daydreamers who actually know how to do something are much rarer.

    *Go where the action is. The Internet is a great equalizer, but it isn't a total equalizer. That means moving near (not necessarily into) a major city if you want to get something done, majorly, instead of just being a regionalist. New York? That's Jersey City right across the river. San Francisco? Welcome to Oakland! Boston? Somerville it is! The outskirts of large cities are still expensive, but you generally won't need a car, so there is some savings to be had. Note: this doesn't mean go to school where the action is and then crawl back to Snoozeville, USA.

    *Do not marry the first person who is nice to you in high school.

    *Build a platform. You have to be in the you business. That means a website, a Twitter feed, an email address with your friggin' name on it and not "kungfupanda420@aol.com." On your platform, try to say original things. Not necessarily provocative things, but original things, so people will actually be interested in checking you out. Don't freak out and delete everything, or change your name or look or career path every time you have a new idea. Consistency is important for brand building. You can be a weirdo, or a homo, or dress funny—just don't change so often that people decide you are either a dilettante or a perennial seeker.

    *Work hard. Pull all-nighters. Bleed. Suffer. Whenever you have a choice between doing something painful and worthwhile and taking it easy with your spouse or having a nice drink with friends, select for agony, until you have built somewhat of a platform. You should find a way to enjoy agony, as there will be plenty.

    *Aim high. You'll probably fail, but by aiming high you'll likely land in the middle. Aim for the middle, you'll still likely fail, but will end up near the bottom.

    *Monetize everything. Doing well? Go on the lecture circuit. Not doing well—try to write or produce work about life as a lovable loser. You got a dog? Start painting pictures of your dog, or pitching article ideas to dog magazines (or other magazines about the politics of dog parks, or whatnot), or whatever. Same with spouses, babies, martial arts, anything else you have going on.

    *You'll know you're getting somewhere when someone appears before you to solicit some work for you. It might be a small person and not a big person; it might be someone just a little better than you. But so long as it isn't a scam or bullshit, the answer is "Yes." Not "Well, I'll think about it" or "How much are you paying?" (that's the second question as it's easier to negotiate from a "yes") or "Uhm, I'm not really familiar with that" (You GET familiar with it the second you're off the phone) but "Yes." "Yes, I can do that." Then do it. Then you'll get around. After a few years, you might be able to afford to say no occasionally. But at the start, the answer is "Yes" to any legitimate offer.

    *Make deadlines. The only excuse for not making a deadline is a funeral—your own.

    *Learn the difference between bridges and cliffs. Don't burn bridges. Don't try to cross cliffs. Big-talkers, daydreamers, people who think that the generic business skills they learned while working for daddy's dry cleaner can be transferred to art industries without alteration, and druggies and boozers are all cliffs. Avoid them. Definitely avoid BEING them.

    *Don't work for "exposure" as these days with the Internet anyone can generate exposure for themselves. Always get something—the exception is at the very beginning of a career, when building a portfolio or clips or whatnot, you can do one or two things for free. Generally, this is school work. But getting paid is part of aiming high.

    *Get to the right place, be ready for the right time. A lot of success in arts industries is "right place, right time." You can't control time. You can control place—the right place is a place where you are producing quality work consistently. Then when the time comes, you're more likely to benefit.
  8. jubei33 is offline
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    Posted On:
    12/01/2011 5:47pm


     Style: Boxing, Solar Ray Attack

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by devil View Post
    I'm not sure what you could construe as backstabbing from my post. Rereading it, the only thing I could see that might be taken that way is the comment about doing 20% of the project load and someone else doing 80%. For the record, the person I'm referring to works for me and it is her job to do the 80%. It has nothing to do with me not carrying my weight.

    When I said "How to be a Boss" I meant it in the slang sense, like this: (Like a Boss - The act of doing something as a boss would do.)

    If you want a more serious answer to "How to be THE Boss", it's simple. First, almost everyone has a boss and is therefore an employee to someone. If you want to be a boss, succeed as an employee and look for your opportunities to advance. If you want to be THE boss, invent something cool or identify a need in the marketplace you can fill. Congratulations, you're an entrepreneur! All the money and all the problems are yours. You're THE BOSS.
    Ah, yes and I've been watching you. In fact, quite a lot of my attention has been spent recently watching my workforce, not unlike a highly paid nanny at times.

    I would wait until Friday, as this is less likely to cause a scene, but this requires immediate attention. I am unsatisfied you are putting forth the effort I expected, vis-a-vis certain internet postings. I don't feel this behavior is indicative of someone of your position, or want it to be representative of this company. We in upper-management want Dillman's Dildo works to be a stand up company, a paragon of work ethic and honesty. We can no longer conscience your lackadaisical attitude towards work and callous regard for other's efforts. As such,

    You're fired. File your last paperwork, turn in your ID and clean out your desk.

    Warm regards,

    Phillip Dillman Sr.
    http://woodwardswhiskey.wordpress.com/

    He was punching him like the collective karmic debt he'd accrued was coming to collections, mostly on his face.
  9. omoplatypus is offline
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    Merry Christmas! shitter's full...

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    Posted On:
    12/01/2011 5:49pm

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     Style: BJJ/Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    devil don't know ****.

    just follow this guy's example.
    --------

    Quote Originally Posted by it is fake View Post
    yeah, normally i'd get a quote, but couldn't be bothered.
  10. judoka_uk is offline
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    Posted On:
    12/01/2011 5:50pm

    Join us... or die
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    Quote Originally Posted by devil View Post
    Medical devices.
    Devil's Dildos Inc.
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