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  1. JingMerchant! is offline
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    ...has all your Jing.

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    Posted On:
    11/20/2011 3:15pm


     Style: Judo, baby! Yeah!

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    The most dangerous thing in the Dojo : The dreaded white belt...!

    I was browsing the interwebs, looking for articles on psychology in MA. I stumbled across this little gem.

    Reposted here :-

    Why Are White Belt Fighters So Dangerous?

    Many experienced martial artists believe that, of all the different categories of training partners, absolute beginners are the most dangerous. To outsiders, this sounds like a paradox. Shouldn’t those with the least martial arts training be the least dangerous?
    It is not truly a paradox, only a misconception. And not all white belts are dangerous, obviously. But those that are, if only on the mat, are so for the following reasons.


    Their goal is always to win.

    They don’t yet understand the difference between trying to win, and trying to cultivate the skills that one uses to win. Real fights are chaotic affairs, and chaos is not a proper breeding ground for skill development; thus, training in respectable martial arts consists of a series of games, first introducing support structures (e.g. rules and conventions), then dismantling them one step at a time.
    The need for, or value in this approach is not obvious–and it is not always explained at the outset. So some white belts never appreciate the context of their practice. Others consider themselves above the “organized despair” of the “traditional mess,” and when a rule stands between them and a sparring victory, they break it without hesitation. The conventions and rules of training, they reason, are “unrealistic in a real fight.”
    Sadly, annoyingly, some of these individuals mistake their impatience for martial prowess–and having checked off another box on their MMA resume, they quickly depart in pursuit of the next imaginary accomplishment. In the words of the seasoned sensei, “They’re someone else’s problem now.”


    They have no self-awareness.

    The white belt fighter will take insane risks that any experienced player would avoid. The white belt fighter will compromise their own balance in an attempt to take yours. They will open up their guard in the hope of passing yours. They consistently expose themselves in the present, thereby expecting to prevail in the near future.
    To the rest of us, watching a white belt fight is like observing a murder-suicide attempt.
    Why are white belts so crazy? They don’t realize when they have made themselves vulnerable, so they are free to do so with carefree abandon. Over time, competing against higher ranked classmates provides a civilizing education.


    They are honest attackers.

    While the previous two points address the folly of youth and inexperience, these qualities also have their benefits. The strength of the white belt is…strength. And speed. And courageous aggression, no matter how ill-founded. And unpredictability.
    People who are more interested in attack than in self-preservation can make great practice partners (so long as minimum safety standards are met). One of the ironies of self-defense is that, unless a trainer can step outside their own mindset–and inhabit the mind and body of the amoral predator–their training does not have any real value.
    The white belt can take you by surprise. They will do something so improbable, so highly inane, that you feel compelled to stop for criticism or laughter instead of taking advantage of the error.
    And yet, surprising the opponent is never really an error, is it?
    Because the white belt fighter is a tremendous resource, there is a tension between helping them mature in skill and temperament, and preserving them in an untamed state (in order to help others grow).
    Black belts would do well to study the best practices of the white belt novice, and incorporate them into their own practice. Let the shodan follow all the rules, while the sandan playfully proclaim, “I can do bad all by myself!”
    Last edited by JingMerchant!; 11/20/2011 3:35pm at . Reason: Adjusted spacings
    "So, yeah, Zen teachers may well insult you, work you to the bone, hit you with sticks, shout verbal abuse at you, and punch the **** out of you.
    And when the ****'s been punched out of you, you might just find that you're far better-off without it." - Vieux Normand

    "So in short, BJJ wins again. BJJ, and chainmail." - TheMightyMcClaw

    "On bullshido, your opinions are not sacred, neither are your feelings." - Scrapper

    "You entered the lions' den. Don't bitch if you get eaten." - danniboi07

    "Needless to say, it's much easier to clear a bunch of drunk kids out of your house when you're yelling GTFO and carrying a samurai sword." - DerAuslander

    "Eventually, I realized it doesn't matter what art you train, what matters is the method in which you train. Training in an alive manner, under skilled and qualified instruction, is the single most important aspect of gaining martial skill. All else is window dressing." - JNP : Saying it how it is!
  2. Your_Majesty is offline

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    Posted On:
    11/20/2011 3:21pm


     

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    White belts are just misguided. Before starting martial arts I asked for beginner tips in the internet and they told me to not act like a retard. Tell them to not act like retards and they will be fine and the guy training with them too.
  3. dflanmod is offline
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    Welterweight

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    Posted On:
    11/20/2011 4:14pm

    supporting member
     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Your_Majesty View Post
    White belts are just misguided. Before starting martial arts I asked for beginner tips in the internet and they told me to not act like a retard. Tell them to not act like retards and they will be fine and the guy training with them too.
    I find that if somebody is too retarded to research this **** before they start a MA then they are often too retarded to accept advice after.

    Retard truth.
    Retards are absoultely convinced that they are geniuses.

    Retards love to share their copius amounts of wisdom with everybody in the gym.
  4. jspeedy is offline
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    Posted On:
    11/20/2011 5:23pm


     Style: FMA

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I think the article uses far too many generalizations to accurately describe every white belt. In addition if you read other articles on the site you'll see that some appear to be satirical in nature like this one:http://www.martialdevelopment.com/bl...stian-tai-chi/. I'm not sure if the article from the OP is supposed to be serious or if it's just written by an idiot.

    I do have some serious banter to add to the topic of dangerous white belts, overall my point is pretty obvious but I feel like going off on a little diatribe. I have found that with FMA an untrained person wielding sticks no surprise can be dangerous not only to themselves but training partners as well. Not in the same sense that an experienced eskrimador is though. The inexperienced person doesn't strike with proper angles of attack. The amateur stick strike may not be as powerful and as efficient as the experienced FMAers but the strikes can come from unorthodox angles, they don't do as much damage but can still hurt. For example, I can read an experienced guy's body position and movement to know he will be delivering a diagonal downward strike passing from the right side to the left... I know for the most part how the strike will be angled because the experienced practitioner has been trained to deliver efficient strikes from specific angles. If an inexperienced practitioner were to deliver the same strike he may not be aware of how to angle his stick and control it, the result could be me preparing to block a strike that ends up landing in a place other than I or even the amateur that through the strike expected.
  5. Sorekara is offline

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    Posted On:
    11/20/2011 5:40pm


     Style: Judo/BJJ

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Your_Majesty View Post
    White belts are just misguided. Before starting martial arts I asked for beginner tips in the internet and they told me to not act like a retard. Tell them to not act like retards and they will be fine and the guy training with them too.
    As frustrating as it may be...... "Don't act like a retard" means what exactly? A good point to make is people need to explain exactly what "don't spazz" means.
  6. Vorpal is offline
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    Posted On:
    11/20/2011 7:27pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Don't spazz means- Don't approach sparring as if is a life or death struggle. Think about what you are trying to accomplish, do not flail about aimlessly. If you are in a grappling art and are using a large amount of strength for something other than a finishing technique you are probably spazzing. If you learned a technique in class, chances are the higher belt you are sparring with is giving you an opening to attempt it, if you ignore this to do something you thought of yourself you are probably spazzing. If you are in a striking art and you are swinging for the fences you are doing it wrong. If you abandon form and technique in a chaotic bid to "win" you are probably spazzing.

    People, if you are new to a grappling art learn to tap. Don't think of it as "losing" or "surrendering". Think of it as you telling your partner "you are doing it right, you got it, let's start again". Having this mindset will help you not to spazz.
    Last edited by Vorpal; 11/20/2011 8:07pm at . Reason: retarded spelling
  7. Sorekara is offline

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    Posted On:
    11/20/2011 7:59pm


     Style: Judo/BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Vorpal View Post
    Don't spazz means- Don't approach sparring as if is a life or death struggle. Think about what you are trying to accomplish, do not flail about aimlessly. If you are in a grappling art and are using a large amount of strength for something other than a finishing technique you are probably spazzing. If you learned a technique in class, chances are the higher belt you are sparring with is giving you an opening to attempt it, if you ignore this to do something you thought of yourself you are probably spazzing. If you are in a striking art and you are swining for the fences you are doing it wrong. If you abandon form and technique in a chaotic bid to "win" you are probably spazzing.

    People, if you are new to a grappling art learn to tap. Don't think of it as "losing" or "surrendering". Think of it as you telling your partner "you are doing it right, you got it, let's start again". Having this mindset will help you not to spazz.
    Nice! There should be a "Spazz" Sticky somewhere. This is a good start.
  8. W. Rabbit is offline
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    insight combined with intel, fuse, and dynamite

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    Posted On:
    11/20/2011 9:34pm

    supporting member
     Style: (Hung Ga+BJJ+MT+JKD) ^ Qi

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Whenever I tried to spazz on judo sensei he would simply choke me out. What a great lesson that was, I stopped after 2-3 times.
  9. musicalmike235 is offline

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    Posted On:
    11/20/2011 11:06pm


     Style: Grappling

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    What that article described is a judo white belt who doesn't understand the difference between randori and shia (or however the hell its spelled).

    Personally, what makes a whitebelt dangerous is, you see him as a whitebelt and thus beneath you. However you fail to take into consideration that he might have skills from other similar martial arts.

    Enter the ex-wrestler who decides to train in judo. You decide to randori with him, and he repeatedly scores ippons on you off of morote-gari, te guruma, kata guruma, and ura nage. Does a number on you psychologically. Then again, more often than not, the upper belts in judo (brown, and black) don't tend to have this problem.
  10. PowerfulFellow is offline

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    Posted On:
    11/21/2011 12:39am

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Shorei-Ryu/Goju-Ryu/BJJ

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    If you ever want to see if your martial art MAY work, train with a white belt. Or at least someone who doesn't know what you're doing.
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