223823 Bullies, 4280 online  
  • Register
Our Sponsors:

Results 21 to 23 of 23
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Sponsored Links Spacer Image
  1. mrh80 is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    133

    Posted On:
    12/19/2011 5:40pm


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Coeloptera View Post
    I'm not sure i understand here. Why bother if lifting heavy weights?

    Also, I use the treadmill because my city isn't very good for paths (I'm in Las Vegas) and also so I can do precise intervals at a specific speed (I am, admittedly, a stickler about that).

    - Coeloptera
    In the context of you quote, I was reading that you wanted to monitor/stay in the "cardio zone". In this context lifting heavy weights would not strictly do this as you would get close to your max HR when lifting and drop down again while rested. People generally lift heavy weights to gain strength and/or muscle, with cardio benefit as a bi-product. A heart rate monitor could be useful, particularly to see how quickly you recover after set of low rep heavy lifts.

    I've never been to Vegas so maybe the treadmill is needed if you like running. I hate them and will jump rope or do some burpees if I have no where to run.
  2. Coeloptera is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Las Vegas, NV
    Posts
    11

    Posted On:
    12/19/2011 9:53pm


     Style: Krav Maga

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by mrh80 View Post
    In the context of you quote, I was reading that you wanted to monitor/stay in the "cardio zone". In this context lifting heavy weights would not strictly do this as you would get close to your max HR when lifting and drop down again while rested. People generally lift heavy weights to gain strength and/or muscle, with cardio benefit as a bi-product. A heart rate monitor could be useful, particularly to see how quickly you recover after set of low rep heavy lifts.
    For the running - yes, I do that for cardio health and long-term endurance. I tend to stay around 150bpm or so (my resting rate tends to be in the 55-60 range) while doing the 7mph intervals.

    Mmm, a heart monitor isn't a bad idea at all. Now I'm curious as to how quickly I am recovering from a set of 5 near-max lifts.

    But yes, Vegas isn't great for running. Few parks with decent paths, sidewalks also not great. Also, most months, terrible sun. I've been beaten genetically where sunlight is concerned (not the heat, the UV).

    - Coeloptera
  3. selfcritical is offline

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    austin, tx
    Posts
    2,428

    Posted On:
    12/21/2011 8:55pm


     Style: Pekiti, ARMA, other stuff

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I'm not sure how accurately HR maps onto CNS fatigue for maximal weight lifting. Since you don't really accumulate a lot of lactate unless you're doing muscular endurance work, it won't elevate quite as hard as repetitive high-speed movements, usually. I wear one when I lift, but I haven't gotten much information- the HR doesn't spike like it does during 5-10 second sprints, and I recover down to normal "warmed up" HR within 30 seconds usually. I've heard that HR variability is a good measure of CNS fatigue, but most monitors don't measure that, and the ones that do are meant to be used early in the day, not mid-workout
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Powered by vBulletin™© contact@vbulletin.com vBulletin Solutions, Inc. 2011 All rights reserved.