230590 Bullies, 3606 online  
  • Register
Our Sponsors:

Results 11 to 20 of 85
Page 2 of 9 FirstFirst 12 3456 ... LastLast
Sponsored Links Spacer Image
  1. Rock Ape is offline
    Rock Ape's Avatar

    Watch and Shoot !

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    10,134

    Posted On:
    10/02/2011 9:34pm

    staff
     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Mister View Post
    I was also told before that I shouldn't be doing static techniques anymore, but I want to perfect all techniques
    A grading isn't the time to do that, during the test you should be concentrating on demonstrating what you're able to do.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mister View Post
    think one's mistakes are easily hidden in a dynamic situation, am I right in this?
    Quite the opposite. Under pressure your mistakes and poor habits become more evident, that's part of the reasoning for a physical test.

    How much juwaza did you do (ni-nindori /san-indori) for your last test, did your instructor work you until your were completely exhausted ? It's only when we're working on empty that we realise where our real stengths and weaknesses are- both physically and mentally.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mister View Post
    You seem to have trained extensively, may I ask why you stopped (you mentioned that earlier)?
    Just short of 25 years in aikido studying primarily Aikikai under the auspices of the Doshu but then later (my last 5 years of study) within Iwama Ryu. I stopped training due to being deployed to the Middle East. Now I just study Kendo and Iaido.
    "To sin by silence when one should protest makes cowards out of men".

    ~Ella Wheeler
  2. Mister is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Cairo, Egypt
    Posts
    642

    Posted On:
    10/02/2011 9:48pm


     Style: Injured

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Rock Ape View Post
    A grading isn't the time to do that, during the test you should be concentrating on demonstrating what you're able to do.

    Quite the opposite. Under pressure your mistakes and poor habits become more evident, that's part of the reasoning for a physical test.

    How much juwaza did you do (ni-nindori /san-indori) for your last test, did your instructor work you until your were completely exhausted ? It's only when we're working on empty that we realise where our real stengths and weaknesses are- both physically and mentally.

    Just short of 25 years in aikido studying primarily Aikikai under the auspices of the Doshu but then later (my last 5 years of study) within Iwama Ryu. I stopped training due to being deployed to the Middle East. Now I just study Kendo and Iaido.
    I understand, I will concentrate on doing more dynamic techniques for the rest of my training.

    We do Jiu Waza once a week or so, most of it is ni-nidori a little is san-nindori, but it's more like randori than jiu waza where we just do tai sabaki to throw uke and then turn to quickly face the next opponent.

    Jiu waza with techniques we don't do very often, maybe I should start doing that with some of my mates.

    And it's a shame you stopped training, I hope you can train again soon.
  3. Aikironin21 is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    California
    Posts
    232

    Posted On:
    10/03/2011 4:02am


     Style: Aikido, Kajukembo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I think Rock Ape hit everything pretty much. I would suggest, concentrating and focusing your force or energy, straight down through the shoulder more on your immobilization techniques. We all can get a little off to the side on these as we get more comfortable with them. It's almost like they become "routine", so we get the arm sticking straight out from uke's shoulder, rather than elevated above it. Very seldom does an uke in practice ever capitalize on this, but if you want to make your technique better, remember, the purpose is control. If you don't have uke's shoulder pinned to the ground, he can scramble and power out of your pins.

    The best is to really apply yourself to practicing ikyo. We get by with lazy technique because uke knows he is supposed to go down to the ground, and submits once you have him bent over. Truth is, most aikidoka have very little control over uke at that point, due to keeping uke's arm level and stright out from uke's shoulder. Yes he may be bent over, but any grappler here will tell you, your legs are very vulnerable at this point. Just as you are not supposed to step forward with your near foot till uke has touched the ground, you need to elevate uke's arm so you create the necessary downward force to keep him from turning back into you and getting into your legs.

    Keeping uke's arm level looks a little cleaner, because everything seems to kind of fit together, and be in harmony. It kind of is in a way, because uke is more comfortable.
  4. DCS is offline
    DCS's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    4,056

    Posted On:
    10/03/2011 5:12am

    Join us... or die
     Style: 柔道

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Not bad for a 2nd kyu test. Congratulations.

    There is a pair of things I think you should work from now on:

    a) Footwork. You're doing more steps than needed.
    b) Don't look at uke all the time. Once contact is made you know where he is and your relative position to him. And, as RA pointed, you being taller and keeping your eyes on him makes you to lean forward breaking your posture.

    On the other hand, I think you should work more on fundamentals than on dynamic techniques at this moment, and for testing, use as uke the higher rank available but not one who worked with you training for the test.
  5. Mister is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Cairo, Egypt
    Posts
    642

    Posted On:
    10/03/2011 6:53am


     Style: Injured

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Aikironin21 View Post
    I think Rock Ape hit everything pretty much. I would suggest, concentrating and focusing your force or energy, straight down through the shoulder more on your immobilization techniques. We all can get a little off to the side on these as we get more comfortable with them. It's almost like they become "routine", so we get the arm sticking straight out from uke's shoulder, rather than elevated above it. Very seldom does an uke in practice ever capitalize on this, but if you want to make your technique better, remember, the purpose is control. If you don't have uke's shoulder pinned to the ground, he can scramble and power out of your pins.

    The best is to really apply yourself to practicing ikyo. We get by with lazy technique because uke knows he is supposed to go down to the ground, and submits once you have him bent over. Truth is, most aikidoka have very little control over uke at that point, due to keeping uke's arm level and stright out from uke's shoulder. Yes he may be bent over, but any grappler here will tell you, your legs are very vulnerable at this point. Just as you are not supposed to step forward with your near foot till uke has touched the ground, you need to elevate uke's arm so you create the necessary downward force to keep him from turning back into you and getting into your legs.

    Keeping uke's arm level looks a little cleaner, because everything seems to kind of fit together, and be in harmony. It kind of is in a way, because uke is more comfortable.
    I'll be honest with you I don't understand what "Harmony" or "Ki" means, I mean in theory it's all fine and makes sense but in practice I don't know how to use that.

    I always thought Ikkyo was a tricky technique it looks easy but damn...

    Good advice, yes I must work on my Ikkyo further, thanks!

    I was worried about Irimi Nage, I think it's the hardest technique in the curriculum because you must keep uke close at all times and one mistake uke can face you and take you down (we counter each other's techniques sometimes in practice and take advantage of openings, all in good spirit ofcourse), does anyone have anything to say about it?

    I'd say I've been taken down in Irimi Nage more than I've been in anything else. (Many many times)
  6. Mister is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Cairo, Egypt
    Posts
    642

    Posted On:
    10/03/2011 6:54am


     Style: Injured

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by DCS View Post
    Not bad for a 2nd kyu test. Congratulations.

    There is a pair of things I think you should work from now on:

    a) Footwork. You're doing more steps than needed.
    b) Don't look at uke all the time. Once contact is made you know where he is and your relative position to him. And, as RA pointed, you being taller and keeping your eyes on him makes you to lean forward breaking your posture.

    On the other hand, I think you should work more on fundamentals than on dynamic techniques at this moment, and for testing, use as uke the higher rank available but not one who worked with you training for the test.
    Thanks!

    I'll work on footwork to do exactly the steps needed, I know I should do that but I let things slide sometimes, you're right.

    I know this sounds like a stupid question but...Where should I look if not at Uke?
  7. DCS is offline
    DCS's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    4,056

    Posted On:
    10/03/2011 7:22am

    Join us... or die
     Style: 柔道

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Mister View Post
    I know this sounds like a stupid question but...Where should I look if not at Uke?
    Your surroundings, just in case uke's friends want to join the party. Being aware of what is happenning around you will help both in avoiding accidents in training (like throwing uke towards other people) and in succesful randori against various uke (like throwing uke towards other people).

    If **** hits the fan for real, you're going to lose most of your peripheral vision. Focusing on an uke who is already thrown/pinned is unnecessary. Work on looking for what/who is coming next.

    And remember, where the head goes, the body follows. If you are looking down you're compromising your own balance.

    The same principle is used in bjj:

  8. Mister is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Cairo, Egypt
    Posts
    642

    Posted On:
    10/03/2011 8:19am


     Style: Injured

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I've never been told this before but you make a good point.

    That will be kind of hard to get into as I'm always used to looking at my opponent, may I ask how you trained for that? If there are any methods in particular or I should just remind myself not to look at uke all the time until it becomes second nature?
  9. Eddie Hardon is offline

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    London
    Posts
    2,502

    Posted On:
    10/03/2011 2:17pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Trad Ju Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I rather liked it, so thank you for posting.

    There is some similarity in Trad JJ, when starting 2nd Dan I was required to kneel and practise 11 sets of Wrist locks on both sides and I had to move to apply the lock. As an ex-footballer (all through childhood and youth) i have rather large Calf muscles and it bloody killed me. Fortunately the rules relaxed and all students could do them Standing (aaahhhhh...).

    I liked the Progression from the kneeling and the circular movement and contra-indicative to execute Throws. I also liked the Body Movement that informed the Technique (Tai Sabaki as has been correctly said).

    Strking IS part of our Syllabus however, to reiterate, I enjoyed your vid post and provides food for thought (which means I'm going to steal part so it). ; )

    cheers
  10. Rock Ape is offline
    Rock Ape's Avatar

    Watch and Shoot !

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    10,134

    Posted On:
    10/03/2011 2:40pm

    staff
     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Mister View Post
    I'll be honest with you I don't understand what "Harmony" or "Ki" means, I mean in theory it's all fine and makes sense but in practice I don't know how to use that.
    Ok, this could be such a diverse conversation which, I've often seen ending up between the extremes of logical to down right ridiculous in nature - depending upon who you talk too on the subject.

    I'll give you my perspective on what "harmony" and "ki" means to me. You can take that for what it's worth.

    The ideological doctrine of aikido is that of "Resolving conflict without violence" ... but, who's defining what constitutes as "violence" and to what level?

    Given that Ueshiba is the founder of the discipline, it's a good starting point to attribute him as the person defining the statement, however; his attitude toward violence changed as he aged thus we must discard any of his exploits prior to the conclusion of WWII and, the official creation of Aikido as a recognised martial art. Thus, his definition must be based on his desire to use Aikido as a means of reconciliation so, almost no level of violence at all.

    The Paradox of this is that we're studying a martial tradition which does not advocate "fighting" because by definition, we're engaging in the "violence" which aikido wishes to resolve. In essence we strive to be in a constant state of harmony with ourselves and our surroundings - remember this is an ideological doctrine but we don't exist in an ideal world.

    The reality is however, when faced with a physical conflict our training should, at the very least, give us the ability to position ourselves in the right place at the right time to perform a given technique. - AWASE -

    In doing so we're part way into removing our opponent's ability to carry out his intentions of doing us harm, we're beginning (ideologically speaking) to restore the balance of "harmony" between you and your opponent. We achieve this by maintaining some form of physical contact - MUSUBI - and through this we effectively disrupt that individual's ability to maintain their normal posture - KUZUSHI -

    Whilst doing all of that we're utilising - KOKYU - which is our ability to captitilise on our respiratory function to control not only ourselves but, to add demonstrably noticeable power into our techniques because we're involving our entire body (internally and externally)

    Our determination and courage during confrontations is driven from within our spirit, - KI - Not the mystical, religious bullshit often associated with the term, but the tenacity of our character to get the job done.
    "To sin by silence when one should protest makes cowards out of men".

    ~Ella Wheeler
Page 2 of 9 FirstFirst 12 3456 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Powered by vBulletin™© contact@vbulletin.com vBulletin Solutions, Inc. 2011 All rights reserved.