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  1. BKR is offline
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    My dog is cuter and smarter than yours.

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    Posted On:
    10/07/2011 12:15am

    Join us... or die
     Style: Kodokan Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by judoka_uk View Post
    Normally you weight the rear corner of the ankle:



    You can catch the foot as its coming forward, but its incredibly hard to do.

    The other day during nagekomi, I did a reverse tsugi ashi movement and the dynamic delay generated meant I caught uke's foot as it was coming forward. Didn't mean to and absolutely fucking buried him, we were both surprised, took uke a while to get his breath back, lucky he was a dan grade and instinctively tucked his chin in otherwise it would have been a Matsiev scenario.
    So you actually did the throw correctly for a change, congratulations!

    If you aren't burying them everytime like that then you need to work on it more.
    Falling for Judo since 1980
  2. judoka_uk is offline
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    Posted On:
    10/07/2011 5:38am

    Join us... or die
     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by BKR View Post
    So you actually did the throw correctly for a change, congratulations!

    If you aren't burying them everytime like that then you need to work on it more.
    I thought we'd already established this was the case.
  3. BKR is offline
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    My dog is cuter and smarter than yours.

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    Posted On:
    10/07/2011 4:32pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Kodokan Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by judoka_uk View Post
    I thought we'd already established this was the case.
    Debana for jibe present, could not resist.
    Falling for Judo since 1980
  4. judoka_uk is offline
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    Posted On:
    10/07/2011 4:59pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by BKR View Post
    Debana for jibe present, could not resist.
    Grudging wazari.
  5. BKR is offline
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    My dog is cuter and smarter than yours.

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    Posted On:
    10/08/2011 11:15pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Kodokan Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I find nothing more gratifying than a Kouchi Gari in which uke lands on the back of his head.
    Falling for Judo since 1980
  6. adskibullus is offline

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    Posted On:
    10/09/2011 1:59am


     Style: Lifting heavy stuff

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Im looking forward to getting back to judo now that the concussion has cleard up, and spending some time on ko uchi.

    Can ko uchi gari be used on an advancing and retreating uke? Or does it work better in one direction?

    Im assuming ko uchi is the judo equivalent of the boxers jab, a technique that when used properly can really unsettle your opponent and create openings. I know that in theory any judo techniques can be combined but ko uchi looks like a good one to start with it seems pretty low risk and at least if i dont actually throw them with it then it might make them stumble and create an opening.

    Im at the heavier end of the judo scale and when its comes to randori there doesnt really seem to be alot of openings, heavy weight just seem to shuffle around where as the lighter ones are scooting around everywhere. I find this means that i struggle to get any movement from my opponent in which to work with and when i try to turn in for a throw i usually get countered.

    Im starting to get the feel of my throws in uchikomi but im still a million miles away when trying against anyform of resistance. Im thinking combinations are the way forward, keep attacking the leading leg of uke trying to throw him but if i cant at least getting so form of reaction like a step back or some form of jigotai which i can use?
  7. BKR is offline
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    My dog is cuter and smarter than yours.

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    Posted On:
    10/09/2011 3:22am

    Join us... or die
     Style: Kodokan Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by adskibullus View Post
    Im looking forward to getting back to judo now that the concussion has cleard up, and spending some time on ko uchi.

    Can ko uchi gari be used on an advancing and retreating uke? Or does it work better in one direction?

    Im assuming ko uchi is the judo equivalent of the boxers jab, a technique that when used properly can really unsettle your opponent and create openings. I know that in theory any judo techniques can be combined but ko uchi looks like a good one to start with it seems pretty low risk and at least if i dont actually throw them with it then it might make them stumble and create an opening.

    Im at the heavier end of the judo scale and when its comes to randori there doesnt really seem to be alot of openings, heavy weight just seem to shuffle around where as the lighter ones are scooting around everywhere. I find this means that i struggle to get any movement from my opponent in which to work with and when i try to turn in for a throw i usually get countered.

    Im starting to get the feel of my throws in uchikomi but im still a million miles away when trying against anyform of resistance. Im thinking combinations are the way forward, keep attacking the leading leg of uke trying to throw him but if i cant at least getting so form of reaction like a step back or some form of jigotai which i can use?
    It's hard to give advice on this without seeing you do Judo. Kouchi Gari might be too much for you at this point, it might not. The problem will be, as usual, getting a decent uke for your to work with.

    You can do Kouchi Gari on an advancing or retreating uke, or a basically static one.

    Typically, you try Kouchi Gari and uke will step back and lean forward, or step back and lean backwards. You do a forward throw like Seoi Nage if they step back and lean forward, and a rear throw like Ouchi Gari if they step back and lean back.

    Getting big guys to move is always a problem. Make sure to focus on the fundamentals as Judoka UK has outlined as your primary training before worrying about combinations.

    With a good uke, who will feed you the reaction you want to work on, you can pick combinations up fairly quickly in drills, but it will still take a lot of time before you start pull the off in typical kyu grade randori. It's best to lay off the randori and do throw for throw nage komi with randori like movment for a while, get the rythm and timing down, then try normal randori.

    But that's unlikely to happen in most Judo clubs.
    Falling for Judo since 1980
  8. jowalker is offline

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    Posted On:
    2/23/2012 2:15pm


     Style: Shotokan

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    This is one of the few throws that is allowed in our karate organizations competitions. I like trying this after working my way inside with my hands or as they place their lead leg down after a kick (if I'm on the inside).

    We can use: o uchi gari, ko uchi gari, (gake variations), osoto gari, tai otoshi (essentially any non hip-levering, non-sacrifice throw).
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