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  1. Lindz is offline

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    Posted On:
    9/28/2011 2:50pm

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    Quote Originally Posted by yli View Post


    The thousand-year egg. And you thought deep frying was bad. Try preserving an egg in quicklime and see how that goes.

    Edit: Not that horrible tasting in small amounts. Just very, very, very, very, very egg-y in flavor.
    I heard it was horse piss, rather than quicklime.


    Quote Originally Posted by gregaquaman View Post
    Beef would be the closest match
    Supposedly roo used to be exported as "Australian beef" and no one noticed
  2. yli is offline

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    Posted On:
    9/28/2011 2:59pm


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    Quote Originally Posted by Lindz View Post
    I heard it was horse piss, rather than quicklime.
    Piss is pH neutral and wouldn't cause the proper reaction.
  3. Katriona1992 is offline

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    Posted On:
    9/28/2011 6:59pm


     Style: Boxing and No Gi BJJ

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lindz View Post
    I heard it was horse piss, rather than quicklime.
    Chiming in slightly- but that thing coupled with porridge and pork shreds is actually pretty yummy :)
  4. Katriona1992 is offline

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    Posted On:
    9/28/2011 7:04pm


     Style: Boxing and No Gi BJJ

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    I am Australian but spend an extended amount of time in Hong Kong (due to my dad's job). The slightly exotic and equally tasty food I have tried are:

    Chicken Feet:


    Fried Pig Big Intestines



    Marinated Cow Organs (this can include cow stomach, cow liver and so on)


    and Pig's blood (frozen then later boiled)
  5. Sorekara is offline

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    Posted On:
    9/28/2011 8:34pm


     Style: Judo/BJJ

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    Who said they didn't like Boudin? Cajun food is the best IMO.
  6. The Juggernoob is offline

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    Posted On:
    9/28/2011 8:41pm


     Style: 'Grapplin'

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sorekara View Post
    Who said they didn't like Boudin? Cajun food is the best IMO.
    Boudin is french. The Cajuns didnt invent that one im afraid.
  7. judoist is offline

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    Posted On:
    2/03/2012 5:55pm


     Style: Judo

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    http://www.google.com/imgres?q=pljes...w=1034&bih=622

    Serbian pljeskavica, (ground beef, stuffed with bacon and cheese)

    http://www.google.com/imgres?q=banja...w=1034&bih=622

    Banja Luka-style cevap (Serbian kebab)

    http://www.google.com/imgres?q=Niski...w=1034&bih=622

    http://www.google.com/imgres?q=Niski...w=1034&bih=622

    Niš-style burek (a pastry made in a round shape, where the dough is thrown through the air to get the desired shape line in the second picture, traditionally stuffed with either cottage cheese or ground meatm with each burek cut into eight slices - "eights", usually eaten for breakfast with yoghurt)
  8. Douche_Supreme is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/19/2012 1:23pm


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    Quote Originally Posted by jspeedy View Post
    My goal with this thread is to educate bullies and newbs alike about the day to day foods eaten by different cultures throughout the world. Include pics and descriptions of different regional cuisine in your neck of the woods.

    Not too long ago scotch eggs was mentioned in a thread, I asked about it and was given a description and pics of this English breakfast food. My question is what do other cultures regularly eat? What do Aussies regularly eat? Kangaroo? How about Israel? Falaffel, hummus? I don't know. What about Russians? Ect. All I have to base my knowledge of foreign food is Chinese, Middle Eastern, Indian, ect. restaurants that have been Americanized and from what I hear differ greatly from the actual food of their respective countries.

    Since I'm American I'll start with American food. Immediately barbeque food comes to mind.I'm not sure if it originated in America but I know we do a damn good job cooking it. However, regional styles differ. Near the east coast in North And South Carolina a vinegar based tangy sauce is common served on varieties of smoked meats such as ribs, pulled pork, beef brisket and chicken and in the south we barbeque shrimp. In the southwest spicy barbeque sauce is more common. In other areas down south a sweet thick molasses based sauce is more common. Common sides are coleslaw which is shredded cabbage with other stuff thrown in mainly mayonaise and various spices, tastes range from sweet to spicy. Also, garlic bread, baked potato, and various greens. To drink, beer or sweet tea.
    Attachment 12770Attachment 12771
    Pulled Pork Sandwich and Baby Back Ribs


    Since I'm from Florida I'll describe our regional cuisine. Seafood is the main difference from other areas in the U.S. and carribean and Spanish flavors are more common in south FL. Common fish to eat are redfish, red snapper, grouper, flounder, trigger fish, cobia (also called ling up north I think), wahoo, swordfish,... the list goes on. The fish can be fried, grilled, smoked, or blackened. "Blackened" just means a spicy seasoning is added and the fish is grilled. In addition, shrimp, clams, and oysters are popular.
    Attachment 12772
    Here's some trigger fish I grilled the other night. I made a home made "salsa verde" sauce, it's basically pureed mint,parsley, shallots, garlic,lemon zest, with an olive oil base. I served the fish over some steamed green beans and whipped potatoes. With a decent bottle of Vouvray to drink.

    As for every day American food here's a basic list. Meatloaf, pork chops, steak, pizza, hamburgers, hotdogs, spaghetti, sausage, various cassaroles. The list goes on but I just wanted to give a few examples of common everyday dinner items.

    Sorry for the long winded post. I just wanted to give examples of what I was going for with this thread. To restate, talk about food that is unique to your country and how it varies, discuss the food unique to your region, or list common dinners that everyday average people in your country eat. Don't just say I like pancakes for example. I and everyone else here doesn't care what you like. Educate us! describe food that you don't think others are familiar with.
    How dare you mention BBQ and not put TX BBQ in your blurb. Barbecue doesn't come any purer than what they serve in the hill country and Central Texas. The rub is simply salt, coarse-ground black pepper and cayenne, and the meat is flavored by the sweet smoke of post oak, pecan wood, or mesquite. This is a 'no sauce' zone where folks savor the unadorned meat that is rich and beefy, a little bit salty and ringed a rosy pink from the smoke. I personally prefer no marinade or seasoning, as this alot of times dries the meat out. Good Briskit should be moist and flavorful, and should look like this.


    Anyone arguing that Brisket is not the best BBQ in the US can come meet me @ Kreuz Market in Lockheart TX. After you try the meat there and admit that I am right though, you must submit to a thrashing about the head and ears with a 12lb raw brisket.
    Best Places for Brisket:

    1. City Market, Luling TX- Classic and ageless, this Spartan barbecue joint does just three things—make that four—but does them flawlessly. The brisket’s rub gives the outside some crunch, while the inside remains moist and plastic-fork-tender; sweetly glazed pork ribs melt in your mouth; mildly spiced beef sausage squirts juices when bitten; and the mysterious, dark orange sauce—thin, sweet, redolent of mustard and peppers—is like no other. Order meat in the smoky pit room; grab sides, condiments, and drinks at the front counter; and eat with boundless pleasure at long tables or booths. Beer.
    This is barbecue’s holy of holies: City Market’s dark pit room, located in a back corner of the main dining hall. Clouds of post oak incense have been rising from its five pits for more than fifty years, and the smoke envelops manager Joe Capello Sr. and his crew as they slice your order—a choice of brisket, ribs, sausage, nothing else—onto butcher paper. You pay at the blackened cash register, then take your place at one of the pine booths or tables. Your first bite of a generous rib is tender, salty, fall-off-the-bone succulent. The brisket, perfectly crispy yet moist, emanates an addictive woodsmoke flavor. And, oh, the homemade beef sausage! Epic. Coarse and juicy, it alone is worth the journey. You forgot about the sauce, but it’s in a glass bottle right in front of you. And when you get around to tasting it—a thin, orange-ish, deliciously mustardy concoction—the signs imploring you to “Please leave sauce bottles on tables” suddenly make sense. In fact, your yearnings now met, your hopes fulfilled—suddenly everything makes sense.
    BBQ SNOB SAYS: 2011: Not much more can be said about how great the meats are here in Luling. The brisket was smoky, tender, and moist. The ribs had a bit of chewiness, but the flavor was perfect, and the links were juicy with plenty of black pepper kick to go with that beefiness. There’s a reason I go back to Luling whenever I’m within about an hour of it.


    Tie for 1. Kreuz Market- Lockheart TX-Who says nothing ever changes at this champeen of German-style, oak-smoked barbecue? Sure, the juicy beef—fatty brisket and lean shoulder clod—is still tender enough to cut with a plastic fork, if they had ’em (plastic knives are the only “silverware”), and the ambrosial pork chops remain the unsung star of the pits. But since moving in 1999 from the original downtown meat market to its present barn on the edge of town, Kreuz has expanded its menu to include, among other items, meaty pork ribs and jalapeño cheese sausage links. There are even token sides now, but still no sauce. Because some things really don’t ever change.
    Kreuz (pronounced “Krites”) does 45 percent of its business on Saturday. The rest of the week it feels like some kind of meat monastery. You enter, footsteps ringing out in the vast, vacant space, and head down a long hall to the pit room. The atmosphere is not convivial—you sit alone in a room, capacity 560, bent quietly over an array of absolutely beautiful meat, with no fork, sauce, or plate to disrupt the communion. The product is simple and potent. The brisket is so smoky you can imagine the tree. Swoon-inducing pork ribs are encrusted with huge chunks of black pepper. The pork chop is submissive and the jalapeño-cheese sausage addictive.

    3. Smittys Market- Lockheart TX-TEXAS MONTHLY SAYS: Partisans debate whether Smitty's or Kreutz Market is now Lockhart's top barbecue spot (and which side of the feuding family they favor) Smitty's gets our vote—from the dark, smoky-scented entryway to the juicy coils of sausage and astonishingly flavorful brisket. Sides of potato salad, pickles, cheese, and more may be bought in the bright, spotless dining room. Beer. Open Sun 9-3, Mon-Fri 7-6, Sat 7-6:30.

    At peak hours, the lines invariably stretch out the back door. Patiently, you inch your way forward, passing the waist-high brick pits and perusing the list of post oak-smoked meats (brisket, pork ribs and chops, shoulder clod, sausage, prime rib). Salivating, you finally place your order for a pound or so of meat (in this ancient hall there are no platters or sandwiches). You pay with cash or check (here there is no debit or credit). You proceed to the high-ceilinged dining room, staring at the meats on your butcher paper (here there are no plates). At last, faint from hunger, you squeeze in at one of the long communal tables and tear into some of the finest barbecue in Texas.
    Smitty’s began around 1900 as Kreuz Market, a German butcher shop that sold fresh meat during the week and smoked whatever was left over on the weekend. The Kreuz name endured even after Edgar “Smitty” Schmidt bought the business, in 1948. It was still in use in 1999, when a dust-up among the late Edgar’s three children caused his son Rick to take the Kreuz name to a new building down the road (see Kreuz Market). Fortunately, daughter Nina Schmidt Sells and her son, John Fullilove, kept the fires burning and reopened under the current name. They made a few concessions to modernity, such as repainting the dining room and offering sauce (you have to ask for it). Other than that, the place is still the proud bulwark of tradition it has always been. May it never change.

    Snow's BBQ- Lexington TX-A small wood-frame restaurant, open only on Saturdays and only from eight in the morning until whenever the meat runs out, usually around noon, Snow’s is remarkable not only for the quality of its ’cue—“outlandishly tender brisket, fall-apart-delicious chicken”—but for the unlikeliness of its story. The genius behind this meat is a petite, energetic woman named Tootsie Tomanetz, who’s been smoking since 1967, when she ran the pits at City Meat Market, in Giddings. She starts the meat smoking at midnight and wraps the brisket in butcher paper around six or seven. When asked why Snow’s wasn’t open more than one day a week, she said matter-of-factly: “There’s no market for it.”

    Louie Mueller's BBQ-Taylor TX-BBQ SNOB SAYS: 2010: Wayne Mueller took our order up front, and we loaded up on turkey, beef ribs, brisket, and a pork steak. When we unwrapped our package at a friend’s house, it was a beautiful sight. All of the meats get a hefty salt-and-black-pepper rub. The pork steak is not a common offering, but it should be—the meat was perfectly tender with plenty of smoke and excellent flavor. The brisket slices, from both the lean and fatty portions, were nearly perfect; the meat was moist (but could have been a bit more tender) and a layer of rendered fat was left on the lean slices. The beef ribs were the best I’ve ever eaten. This tough and fatty cut was rendered down to a silky smooth and tender piece of smoky beefiness.
    2008: I stopped by to pay my respects to the recently departed Bobby Mueller. At 3:30 they were out of everything but brisket and chicken. The smoky-flavored brisket was sliced thick with the signature black pepper rub, but the slices needed more time on the smoker to get to that pull-apart tenderness. The chicken, however, was more tender than I thought possible. The smoke married with the spice beautifully to create an excellent flavor. The ribs were incredibly thick and meaty and imparted a robust flavor. I might even go so far as to say they were nearly perfect. Another solid showing by Louie Mueller’s.
    Last edited by Douche_Supreme; 4/19/2012 1:28pm at .
  9. Douche_Supreme is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/19/2012 2:09pm


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    Quote Originally Posted by gregaquaman View Post
    Beef would be the closest match
    I had 'Roo @ a "fine dining" establishment in Austin Called Hudson's On The Bend. It reminded me more of venison. The plate I had also had Bison Tenderloin, Red Stag, and TX Jack Rabbit. All were tasty! But portions were small in that "fine dining" establishment way... I also had fried lizard on a stick from a vendor at a blues festival in ATX too. It looked like someone took the Geico Gecko stuck a stick up his ass dipped him in batter and fried him like a corn dog. Tasted like crunch chicken. I would assume because of the bones...
  10. jspeedy is offline
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    Posted On:
    4/19/2012 10:39pm


     Style: FMA

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Douche_Supreme View Post
    How dare you mention BBQ and not put TX BBQ in your blurb. Barbecue doesn't come any purer than what they serve in the hill country and Central Texas. The rub is simply salt, coarse-ground black pepper and cayenne, and the meat is flavored by the sweet smoke of post oak, pecan wood, or mesquite. This is a 'no sauce' zone where folks savor the unadorned meat that is rich and beefy, a little bit salty and ringed a rosy pink from the smoke. I personally prefer no marinade or seasoning, as this alot of times dries the meat out. Good Briskit should be moist and flavorful, and should look like this.


    Anyone arguing that Brisket is not the best BBQ in the US can come meet me @ Kreuz Market in Lockheart TX. After you try the meat there and admit that I am right though, you must submit to a thrashing about the head and ears with a 12lb raw brisket.
    Best Places for Brisket:

    1. City Market, Luling TX- Classic and ageless, this Spartan barbecue joint does just three things—make that four—but does them flawlessly. The brisket’s rub gives the outside some crunch, while the inside remains moist and plastic-fork-tender; sweetly glazed pork ribs melt in your mouth; mildly spiced beef sausage squirts juices when bitten; and the mysterious, dark orange sauce—thin, sweet, redolent of mustard and peppers—is like no other. Order meat in the smoky pit room; grab sides, condiments, and drinks at the front counter; and eat with boundless pleasure at long tables or booths. Beer.
    This is barbecue’s holy of holies: City Market’s dark pit room, located in a back corner of the main dining hall. Clouds of post oak incense have been rising from its five pits for more than fifty years, and the smoke envelops manager Joe Capello Sr. and his crew as they slice your order—a choice of brisket, ribs, sausage, nothing else—onto butcher paper. You pay at the blackened cash register, then take your place at one of the pine booths or tables. Your first bite of a generous rib is tender, salty, fall-off-the-bone succulent. The brisket, perfectly crispy yet moist, emanates an addictive woodsmoke flavor. And, oh, the homemade beef sausage! Epic. Coarse and juicy, it alone is worth the journey. You forgot about the sauce, but it’s in a glass bottle right in front of you. And when you get around to tasting it—a thin, orange-ish, deliciously mustardy concoction—the signs imploring you to “Please leave sauce bottles on tables” suddenly make sense. In fact, your yearnings now met, your hopes fulfilled—suddenly everything makes sense.
    BBQ SNOB SAYS: 2011: Not much more can be said about how great the meats are here in Luling. The brisket was smoky, tender, and moist. The ribs had a bit of chewiness, but the flavor was perfect, and the links were juicy with plenty of black pepper kick to go with that beefiness. There’s a reason I go back to Luling whenever I’m within about an hour of it.


    Tie for 1. Kreuz Market- Lockheart TX-Who says nothing ever changes at this champeen of German-style, oak-smoked barbecue? Sure, the juicy beef—fatty brisket and lean shoulder clod—is still tender enough to cut with a plastic fork, if they had ’em (plastic knives are the only “silverware”), and the ambrosial pork chops remain the unsung star of the pits. But since moving in 1999 from the original downtown meat market to its present barn on the edge of town, Kreuz has expanded its menu to include, among other items, meaty pork ribs and jalapeño cheese sausage links. There are even token sides now, but still no sauce. Because some things really don’t ever change.
    Kreuz (pronounced “Krites”) does 45 percent of its business on Saturday. The rest of the week it feels like some kind of meat monastery. You enter, footsteps ringing out in the vast, vacant space, and head down a long hall to the pit room. The atmosphere is not convivial—you sit alone in a room, capacity 560, bent quietly over an array of absolutely beautiful meat, with no fork, sauce, or plate to disrupt the communion. The product is simple and potent. The brisket is so smoky you can imagine the tree. Swoon-inducing pork ribs are encrusted with huge chunks of black pepper. The pork chop is submissive and the jalapeño-cheese sausage addictive.

    3. Smittys Market- Lockheart TX-TEXAS MONTHLY SAYS: Partisans debate whether Smitty's or Kreutz Market is now Lockhart's top barbecue spot (and which side of the feuding family they favor) Smitty's gets our vote—from the dark, smoky-scented entryway to the juicy coils of sausage and astonishingly flavorful brisket. Sides of potato salad, pickles, cheese, and more may be bought in the bright, spotless dining room. Beer. Open Sun 9-3, Mon-Fri 7-6, Sat 7-6:30.

    At peak hours, the lines invariably stretch out the back door. Patiently, you inch your way forward, passing the waist-high brick pits and perusing the list of post oak-smoked meats (brisket, pork ribs and chops, shoulder clod, sausage, prime rib). Salivating, you finally place your order for a pound or so of meat (in this ancient hall there are no platters or sandwiches). You pay with cash or check (here there is no debit or credit). You proceed to the high-ceilinged dining room, staring at the meats on your butcher paper (here there are no plates). At last, faint from hunger, you squeeze in at one of the long communal tables and tear into some of the finest barbecue in Texas.
    Smitty’s began around 1900 as Kreuz Market, a German butcher shop that sold fresh meat during the week and smoked whatever was left over on the weekend. The Kreuz name endured even after Edgar “Smitty” Schmidt bought the business, in 1948. It was still in use in 1999, when a dust-up among the late Edgar’s three children caused his son Rick to take the Kreuz name to a new building down the road (see Kreuz Market). Fortunately, daughter Nina Schmidt Sells and her son, John Fullilove, kept the fires burning and reopened under the current name. They made a few concessions to modernity, such as repainting the dining room and offering sauce (you have to ask for it). Other than that, the place is still the proud bulwark of tradition it has always been. May it never change.

    Snow's BBQ- Lexington TX-A small wood-frame restaurant, open only on Saturdays and only from eight in the morning until whenever the meat runs out, usually around noon, Snow’s is remarkable not only for the quality of its ’cue—“outlandishly tender brisket, fall-apart-delicious chicken”—but for the unlikeliness of its story. The genius behind this meat is a petite, energetic woman named Tootsie Tomanetz, who’s been smoking since 1967, when she ran the pits at City Meat Market, in Giddings. She starts the meat smoking at midnight and wraps the brisket in butcher paper around six or seven. When asked why Snow’s wasn’t open more than one day a week, she said matter-of-factly: “There’s no market for it.”

    Louie Mueller's BBQ-Taylor TX-BBQ SNOB SAYS: 2010: Wayne Mueller took our order up front, and we loaded up on turkey, beef ribs, brisket, and a pork steak. When we unwrapped our package at a friend’s house, it was a beautiful sight. All of the meats get a hefty salt-and-black-pepper rub. The pork steak is not a common offering, but it should be—the meat was perfectly tender with plenty of smoke and excellent flavor. The brisket slices, from both the lean and fatty portions, were nearly perfect; the meat was moist (but could have been a bit more tender) and a layer of rendered fat was left on the lean slices. The beef ribs were the best I’ve ever eaten. This tough and fatty cut was rendered down to a silky smooth and tender piece of smoky beefiness.
    2008: I stopped by to pay my respects to the recently departed Bobby Mueller. At 3:30 they were out of everything but brisket and chicken. The smoky-flavored brisket was sliced thick with the signature black pepper rub, but the slices needed more time on the smoker to get to that pull-apart tenderness. The chicken, however, was more tender than I thought possible. The smoke married with the spice beautifully to create an excellent flavor. The ribs were incredibly thick and meaty and imparted a robust flavor. I might even go so far as to say they were nearly perfect. Another solid showing by Louie Mueller’s.
    Great post very informative! I agree along with most who know decent bbq that for the most part it should be kept relatively simple with sauce served on the side. I don't understand how the most popular bbq joint in my new residence in Orlando serves their meat with sauce already added. Everyone I know raves about the place and I agree it's pretty good but really sauce already on the meat? How can you take them seriously?
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