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  1. Omega Supreme is offline

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    Posted On:
    2/05/2015 5:27pm

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     Style: Chinese Boxing

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Help a father out: Chinese Art Culture

    So my daughter just told me she wanted to do a report on the gender rolls of Chinese Art Culture between the 6th and 17th Century. My reply to that was "Say what? How are you my daughter and are you sure you're only 13?"

    That being said I can't seem to find anything on the subject. Anybody want to help a dad out?
  2. Miranda_Jane is offline

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    Posted On:
    2/05/2015 5:37pm


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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Omega Supreme View Post
    So my daughter just told me she wanted to do a report on the gender rolls of Chinese Art Culture between the 6th and 17th Century. My reply to that was "Say what? How are you my daughter and are you sure you're only 13?"

    That being said I can't seem to find anything on the subject. Anybody want to help a dad out?
    For something that specific, I suspect you will need academic research tools. Are you near a university library? Many university libraries will allow community members to use the resources, though you can't check anything out. A university librarian could also help your daughter look for online journal articles via JSTOR or EBSCO. Some fine art museum will have comparable level resources (as far as material on art goes).

    I just did a couple searches on JSTOR and am not pulling up anything. I suspect it's because I'm plugging in "Chinese" instead of, say, "Tang dynasty." Regardless of the issue with resources, she should probably narrow down that window of time. (Unless that's a typo and you meant to write 16-17th c).
  3. Omega Supreme is offline

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    Posted On:
    2/05/2015 7:43pm

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Nope, not a typo. That being said we do have a university so there's something. BTW how dare you make me look 'JSTOR'.
  4. It is Fake is offline
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    Posted On:
    2/05/2015 8:00pm

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Okay did she define it?

    Is she looking for art history depicting gender roles and culture or, is it women artists cultural roles in Chinese art society?

    I know, I know don't ask.
  5. Omega Supreme is offline

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    Posted On:
    2/05/2015 8:15pm

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    I don't think it's either. She explained to me she wanted to know were there certain types of arts and practices women were allowed to practice and men were allowed to practice.
  6. It is Fake is offline
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    Posted On:
    2/05/2015 9:09pm

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    Ahhhhhhh Martial Arts.
  7. Omega Supreme is offline

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    Posted On:
    2/05/2015 9:37pm

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Are you saying martial arts or is that some weird off comment? If you are I already brought that up and her teacher won't let her use that.
  8. It is Fake is offline
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    Posted On:
    2/05/2015 10:43pm

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I thought I misread the post and you meant martial arts.
  9. W. Rabbit is offline
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    Posted On:
    2/05/2015 11:07pm

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    The Tang-Ming dynasty ages were"golden ages" as far as the development of arts. Misogyny throughout Chinese history is ugly and involves classifying women and assigning them roles.

    So, men were definitely forced towards certain arts (building, war) while women have been traditionally subjugated and forced into certain roles, which includes training in various arts including poetry, painting, calligraphy, sex etc. Most ancient Chinese art is attributed to men, due to their status.

    This is a very good essay on women in Chinese art from the 4th century onward:

    http://gem.greenwood.com/wse/wsePrint.jsp?id=id115

    This is a great library of Ming era female artists:

    http://www.dpm.org.cn/www_oldweb/English/E/e9/index.htm
    Last edited by W. Rabbit; 2/05/2015 11:16pm at .
  10. DARPAChief is offline

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    Posted On:
    2/05/2015 11:09pm


     

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    I found a passage in an old textbook of mine that might be relevant:

    The quality of life of elite women worsened over the Tang-Song transition. In Tang times it was not unusual for an elite gentleman to view an educated and articulated woman as a very desirable companion, and she would often accompany him at drinking or social occasions. By Song times, however, several developments made life grimmer for women. The cult of female chastity, seldom prevelant in Tang times, was in full swing by late Song, as was the idea that a chaste and virtuous women should never remarry, even if her first husband died while in his youth. Concubinage was also much more common during Song times. Perhaps most bizarre of all, the practice of foot binding emerged during Five Dynasties and Song times.

    Wright, David Curtis. The History of China. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 2001. 83, 84.
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