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  1. judoka_uk is offline
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    Posted On:
    11/02/2011 5:51am

    Join us... or die
     Style: Judo

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Gosai View Post
    Hm, just kind of curious since right now my vehicular situation is uncertain at best and I still wanna try keeping up with what little Judo I do have under my belt... are there any good solo exercises/drills I can work on when I'm unable to get to class, or simply desire a good work out in the comfort of my own home?
    Quote Originally Posted by Mister View Post
    Yeah I'd like to know an answer to that question too.

    I do 60 Judo pushups every other day, working my way up to 100 or more, also 100 squats, 70 bicycle crunches and 6 pullups (barely). I honestly don't know why I included that, maybe someone can tell me if something else is more effective.

    In sets of course not all together.
    No not really.

    As beginners you're just going to ingrain bad habits.

    Remember: Practice makes permanent. Only perfect practice makes perfect.

    This is why you need to practice under supervision.

    Stretch 2x a day and go running.

    Quote Originally Posted by Petter View Post
    Judoka_UK et al:

    What aspect of a poorly executed tani otoshi is it that leads to this elevated risk of injury? I pull it off sometimes, and many of my fellow BJJ-ers are fond of it too. Never seen injury result from it, but it’s obvious from the discussion (and video) that it’s a possibility, and how inevitable it becomes when the near-side foot is pinned down by uke’s weight—but what particular fucked-up mechanics in the throw cause it? Poor placement of the blocking leg (too high, too far from uke), some other aspect, or just a whole complicated mess?

    I’m just a nobody blue belt in no position to tell anyone what to do, but if I could identify one specific issue in somebody’s tani otoshi I could mention it as friendly discussion.
    Two key factors that are interrelated.

    1. Resistance

    Whenever you attempt a Tani otoshi in randori, as a beginner, its going to be against resistance.

    Mainly because its a counter throw so beginners apply it in response to an attack.

    This means you have two people straining, one to drag their opponent to the floor and the other straining and trying not to get taken to the floor.

    This means that you will end up in unnatural positions, joints out of alignment and force being applied to them.

    2. Incompetence.

    Because beginners can't apply any throws correctly, because they're beginners and that's what being a beginner means.

    They will always apply Tani otoshi incorrectly.

    Add the challenge of resistance onto incompetence and its injury time.

    In terms of specifically where the majority of injuries occur.

    Its when the Tani otoshi is applied diagonally



    Rather than at a perpendicular.



    As should be obvious to anyone who owns a pair of knees, your knees are designed to bend if force is applied at a perpendicular, but they aren't designed to take force at a diagonal.
  2. Mister is offline

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    Posted On:
    11/02/2011 8:26am


     Style: Injured

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Oh I forgot to say I do stretching too after I train at home, is running and stretching better than the whole pushups squats pullups crunches thing I'm doing?
  3. judoka_uk is offline
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    Posted On:
    11/02/2011 9:04am

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mister View Post
    Oh I forgot to say I do stretching too after I train at home, is running and stretching better than the whole pushups squats pullups crunches thing I'm doing?
    No, but most people when they start Judo think they need to be stronger.

    Because they think their inability to break balance or throw people is because they aren't strong enough, when in reality its because they're just beginners and haven't learned the technique yet.

    Most beginners gain more benefit from improving their cardio than from strength training, because Judo is physically exhausting if you're not used to it. And the fitter you are the longer you practice at decent quality i.e the more repetitions you can do, before fatigue decreases your motor skills.
  4. NeilG is online now
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    Posted On:
    11/02/2011 9:47am


     Style: Kendo

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Straight up cardio is good, but you also need muscular endurance. Look into bodyweight (Hindu) squats.
  5. Mister is offline

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    Posted On:
    11/02/2011 10:08am


     Style: Injured

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I was always told that Hindu Squats are bad for the knees. And that I should do proper squats with correct form instead, as if I'm sitting back into a chair, without raising my heels.

    Hindu squat - is done without weight where the heels are raised and body weight is placed on the toes; the knees track far past the toes.

    Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Squat_%28exercise%29



    Probably everything I was told not to do when squatting. Knees going past toes and standing on toes.

    Do I have it all wrong?
    Last edited by Mister; 11/02/2011 10:12am at .
  6. NeilG is online now
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    Posted On:
    11/02/2011 1:08pm


     Style: Kendo

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Never heard anything about hindu squats being bad for knees. They are bodyweight, so the knees aren't under any more load than you might put them through in any number of sports motions.

    The advice for keeping on your heels and not tracking your knees too far would be for back squats or other weighted exercise. But even with those, my advice is to go ass to grass with a lighter weight rather than the more common 90 degree bend with max weight. People think full range of motion is bad for the knees but actually what happens is that 90 degree bend is the point of max stress. So lighter weight and more range of motion makes moar stronger with less risk. My info may be out of date - this was the consensus of the zoo at misc.fitness.weights a few years back.
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